Adding a Countdown to Orders Page in Open Event Frontend

This blog post will illustrate how you can add a countdown to orders page which on finishing expires the ticket in Open Event. In Open Event we allow some predefined time for users to fill in their details and once the time expires order gets expired and tickets get released. Users can order the tickets again if they want.

We start by adding a createdAt field to orders model so that we can keep track of remaining time. To calculate the time when the order should expire we add predefined time in which user should fill their details to createdAt time. In this way, we get the time when the order will expire.

So now to calculate the remaining time we just subtract the expiring time from current time. And then we render this data into the template. We define getRemainingTime property in our template and fetch the data for that property with help of javascript.

To see the template code visit this link.

The challenge here is to update the time remaining after every second. For this, we take the help of ember runloop. The run.later() function of ember runloop helps us to calculate the property after every second and set it. Code for setting the remaining time with the help of javascript is given below.

// app/components/forms/orders/order-form.js

getRemainingTime: computed('data', function() {
    let willExpireAt = this.get('data.createdAt').add(10, 'minutes');
    this.timer(willExpireAt, this.get('data.identifier'));
  }),

  timer(willExpireAt, orderIdentifier) {
    run.later(() => {
      let currentTime = moment();
      let diff = moment.duration(willExpireAt.diff(currentTime));
      this.set('getRemainingTime', moment.utc(diff.asMilliseconds()).format('mm:ss'));
      if (diff > 0) {
        this.timer(willExpireAt, orderIdentifier);
      } else {
        this.get('data').reload();
        this.get('router').transitionTo('orders.expired', orderIdentifier);
      }
    }, 1000);
  }

 

As given in the code. We pass expiring time and order’s model instance to the timer function. Timer function calculates the remaining time and sets it to getRemainingTime property of template. Timer function runs after every second with the help of run.later() function of ember runloop. To format the remaining time into MM:SS we take help of moment.js library and format the data accordingly.

Once the remaining time is less than zero (time expires) we reload the model and transition current route to expired route. We do not have to set order status as expired inside the FE. Server sets the order as expired after the predefined time. So we just reload the model from the server and we get the updated status of the order.

Resources:
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Adding Helper and Adding Action Buttons to Orders List in Open Event Frontend

This blog post will illustrate how to add a helper to orders list and add action buttons to orders list to delete and cancel an order in Open Event Frontend. To cancel or delete an order item we need to communicate to the server. The API endpoints to which we communicate are:

  • PATCH        /v1/orders/{order_identifier}
  • DELETE    /v1/orders/{orders_identifier}

We will define the action buttons in ui-table component of open event frontend. We will use the cell-actions file to define the cell buttons that will be present in cell-actions column. The following handlebars code will render the buttons on website.

//components/ui-table/cell/events/view/tickets/orders/cell-actions.hbs

class="ui vertical compact basic buttons"> {{#if (and (not-eq record.status 'cancelled') (can-modify-order record))}} {{#ui-popup content=(t 'Cancel order') click=(action (confirm (t 'Are you sure you would like to cancel this Order?') (action cancelOrder record))) class='ui icon button' position='left center'}} class="delete icon"> {{/ui-popup}} {{/if}} {{#if (can-modify-order record)}} {{#ui-popup content=(t 'Delete order') click=(action (confirm (t 'Are you sure you would like to delete this Order?') (action deleteOrder record))) class='ui icon button' position='left center'}} class="trash icon"> {{/ui-popup}} {{/if}} {{#ui-popup content=(t 'Resend order confirmation') class='ui icon button' position='left center'}} class="mail outline icon"> {{/ui-popup}}

 

In above code you can see two things. First is can-modify-order which is a helper. Helper is used to simplify conditional logics which cannot be easily placed in handlebars. Second thing is action. There are two actions defined: cancelOrder and deleteOrder. We will see implementation of these later. First let’s see how we define can-modify-order helper.

In can-modify-order helper we want to return true or false in case we want cancel button and delete button to display or not respectively. We write the code of can-modify-order in helpers/can-modify-order.js file. When we want to get result from this helper we call it from handlebars file and pass any parameter that we want to use in helper. Code for can-modify-order helper is given below.

// helpers/can-modify-order.js

import Helper from '@ember/component/helper';

export function canModifyOrder(params) {
 let [order] = params;
 if (order.amount !== null && order.amount > 0) {
   // returns false if order is paid and completed
   return order.status !== 'completed';
 }
 // returns true for free ticket
 return true;
}

export default Helper.helper(canModifyOrder);

 

We extract the parameter and store it in order variable. We see if it satisfies our conditions we return true else false.

Now lets see how we can define actions to perform delete and cancel action on a order. We define these actions in controllers section of app. After performing suitable operation with order we call save to update modified order and destroyRecord() to delete an order. Let see the code implementation for these actions.

actions: {
   deleteOrder(order) {
     this.set('isLoading', true);
     order.destroyRecord()
       .then(() => {
         this.get('model').reload();
         this.notify.success(this.get('l10n').t('Order has been deleted successfully.'));
       })
       .catch(() => {
         this.notify.error(this.get('l10n').t('An unexpected error has occurred.'));
       })
       .finally(() => {
         this.set('isLoading', false);
       });
   },
   cancelOrder(order) {
     this.set('isLoading', true);
     order.set('status', 'cancelled');
     order.save()
       .then(() => {
         this.notify.success(this.get('l10n').t('Order has been cancelled successfully.'));
       })
       .catch(() => {
         this.notify.error(this.get('l10n').t('An unexpected error has occurred.'));
       })
       .finally(() => {
         this.set('isLoading', false);
       });
   }

 
After defining these actions, buttons in the orders list start working. In this way, we can make use of helper to simplify the conditional logic inside templates and define proper actions.

Resources:
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How to Make Promotional Codes Applicable on Tickets During Ordering in Open Event Frontend

This blog illustrate how to enable application of promotional codes on tickets during ordering tickets in Open Event Frontend to avail discounts and access to special tickets. Open event allows organizers to add some promotional codes on some tickets, which can be used by users to avail additional offers on tickets while ordering. Promotional codes can be of three types:

  1. Discount Codes: Allows customers to buy a ticket at discounted rates.
  2. Access Codes: Allows customers to access some hidden tickets which are accessible only to special customers.
  3. Discount + Access Code: Allows customer to access special tickets and avail discount at the same time.

Creating a discount/access code:

Organizers and admin can create an access code or a discount code from the event dashboard. They can specify the validity period of the code and can also specify the tickets on which the code will be applicable.

Validating promotional code after user enters the code:

User is allowed to enter the promotional code on events page upon selecting the tickets. IF promotional code is valid then suitable discount is provided on applicable tickets and if promotional code is an access code then hidden tickets for which the promotional code is valid are shown.

To check the validity of the promotional code we deal with the following APIs on the open event server:

  • GET             /v1/discount-codes/{Code}              (For Discount code)
  • GET             /v1/access-codes/{Code}                  (For Access code)

Code snippet to check the validity for access code is given below:

let promotionalCode = this.get('promotionalCode');
 let order = this.get('order');
   try {
     let accessCode = await this.get('store').findRecord('access-code', promotionalCode, {});
     order.set('accessCode', accessCode);
     let tickets = await accessCode.get('tickets');
     tickets.forEach(ticket => {
     ticket.set('isHidden', false);
     this.get('tickets').addObject(ticket);
     this.get('accessCodeTickets').addObject(ticket);
     this.set('invalidPromotionalCode', false);
  });
  } catch (e) {
     this.set('invalidPromotionalCode', true);
  }

 

Full code can be seen here https://github.com/fossasia/open-event-frontend/blob/development/app/components/public/ticket-list.js

Similarly for discount code we fetch the details of the discount code via the api and then validate the code. After the validation we apply the discount to the tickets applicable. Code snippet for the discount code part is given below:

try {
  let discountCode = await this.get('store').findRecord('discount-code', promotionalCode, { include: 'tickets' });
  let discountType = discountCode.get('type');
  let discountValue = discountCode.get('value');
  order.set('discountCode', discountCode);
  let tickets = await discountCode.get('tickets');
  tickets.forEach(ticket => {
     let ticketPrice = ticket.get('price');
     if (discountType === 'amount') {
       ticket.set('discount', Math.min(ticketPrice, discountValue));
       this.get('discountedTickets').addObject(ticket);
     } else {
       ticket.set('discount', ticketPrice * (discountValue / 100));
       this.get('discountedTickets').addObject(ticket);
     }
     this.set('invalidPromotionalCode', false);
  });
} catch (e) {
   if (this.get('invalidPromotionalCode')) {
      this.set('invalidPromotionalCode', true);
   }
}

 

Full code can be seen https://github.com/fossasia/open-event-frontend/blob/development/app/components/public/ticket-list.js

After promotional codes are verified we apply them to the selected tickets. In this way we apply the promotional codes to the tickets.

Resources

 

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Adding Online Payment Support in Online Event Frontend via Stripe

Open Event Frontend involves ticketing system which supports both paid and free tickets. To buy a paid ticket Open Event provides several options such as debit card, credit card, cheque, bank transfer and onsite payments. So to add support for debit and credit card payments Open Event uses stripe checkout. Using stripe users can enter their card details and pay for their ticket.

Given below are some steps which are to be followed for successfully charging a user for ticket using his/her card.

  • We get publishable key for organizer’s stripe account using OAuth. See this blog.
  • We render stripe checkout button using stripe publishable key. This helps us identify which user to credit after payment.
  • After clicking checkout button user is prompted to enter his/her card details and verify payment.
  • After user’s verification stripe generates a payment token is which is used by open event frontend to charge the user for stipulated amount.
  • We send this token to open event server which processes the token and charge the user.
  • We get error or success message from open event server as per the process outcome.

To render the stripe checkout button we use ember-cli-stripe. Below is the code which helps us to understand how stripe checkout button is rendered.

// app/templates/orders/placed.hbs 

{{stripe-checkout
    locale='auto'
    name="Open Event"
    description=paymentDescription
    amount=paymentAmount
    key=model.event.stripeAuthorization.stripePublishableKey
    onToken=(action "processStripeToken")
    onClosed=(action "checkoutClosed")
    onOpened=(action "checkoutOpened")
}}

 

Full code can be seen here.

We see that we pass different parameters to stripe button which helps stripe identify how to render the button and what information to display. We have also passed the actions onToken(), onClosed() and onOpened(). All these actions are triggered at different instances based on what event occurs.

onToken(): This action is triggered when user has verified his/her purchase and we stripe has generated the payment token. Stripe passes the token back to client (open event frontend server) to process. We have handled this error via different name “processStripeToken()”. We will see cose for these actions below.

onClosed(): This action is called when checkout prompt is closed. We have not used this action in open event frontend. But this can be used to trigger some event in case your application need some action when checkout prompt is closed.

onOpened(): This action is called when checkout prompt is opened. We have not used this action in open event frontend. But this can be used to trigger some event in case your application need some action when checkout prompt is opened.

Code for these actions are given below. Full code file can be seen here.

//  app/controllers/orders/placed.js 

processStripeToken(token) {
   // Send this token to server to process payment
   let order = this.get('model');
   let chargePayload = {
     'data': {
       'attributes': {
         'stripe'            : token.id,
         'paypal_payer_id'   : null,
         'paypal_payment_id' : null
       },
       'type': 'charge'
     }
   };
   let config = {
     skipDataTransform: true
   };
   chargePayload = JSON.stringify(chargePayload);
   return this.get('loader').post(`orders/${order.identifier}/charge`, chargePayload, config)
     .then(charge => {
       if (charge.data.attributes.status) {
         this.get('notify').success(charge.data.attributes.message);
         this.transitionToRoute('orders.view', order.identifier);
       } else {
         this.get('notify').error(charge.data.attributes.message);
       }
     });
 }

 

In above code snippet for processStipeToken() we are processing the stripe payment token received from stripe after user verifies his/her payment. We pass this token to charge endpoint of open event server. After charging the user server send a response which is displayed on frontend.

In this way we achieve the functionality of adding stripe payment support in open event frontend. Please follow the links below for further clarification and detailed overview.

Resources:
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Integrating Orders API to Allow User Select Tickets for Placing Order in Open Event Frontend

In Open Event Frontend organizer has option to sell tickets for his event. Tickets which are available to public are listed in public page of event for users to buy. In this blog post we will learn how to integrate orders API and manage multiple tickets of varying quantity under an order.

For orders we mainly interact with three API endpoints.

  1. Orders API endpoint
  2. Attendees API endpoint
  3. Tickets API endpoint

Orders and attendees have one to many relationship and similarly orders and tickets also have one to many relationship. Every attendee is related to one ticket. In simple words one attendee has one ticket and one order can contain many tickets of different quantity each meant for different attendee.

// routes/public/index.js

order: this.store.createRecord('order', {
  event     : eventDetails,
  user      : this.get('authManager.currentUser'),
  tickets   : [],
  attendees : []
})

 

We need to create instance of order model to fill in data in that record. We do this in our routes folder of public route. Code snippet is given below.

We create a empty array for tickets and attendees so that we can add their record instances as relationship to order.

As given in screenshot we have a dropdown for each ticket to select quantity of each ticket. To allow user select quantity of a ticket we use #ui-dropdown component of ember-semantic-ui in our template. The code snippet of that is given below.

// templates/components/public/ticket-list.js

{{#ui-dropdown class='compact selection' forceSelection=false onChange=(action 'updateOrder' ticket) as |execute mapper|}}
  {{input type='hidden' id=(concat ticket.id '_quantity') value=ticket.orderQuantity}}
    <i class="dropdown icon"></i>
    
class="default text">0
class="menu">
class="item" data-value="{{map-value mapper 0}}">{{0}}
{{#each (range ticket.minOrder ticket.maxOrder) as |count|}}
class="item" data-value="{{map-value mapper count}}">{{count}}
{{/each}} </div> {{/ui-dropdown}}

 

For every change in quantity of ticket selected we call a action named updateOrder. The code snippet for this action is given below.

// components/public/ticket-list.js

updateOrder(ticket, count) {
      let order = this.get('order');
      ticket.set('orderQuantity', count);
      order.set('amount', this.get('total'));
      if (count > 0) {
        order.tickets.addObject(ticket);
      } else {
        if (order.tickets.includes(ticket)) {
          order.tickets.removeObject(ticket);
        }
      }
    },

 

Here we can see that if quantity of selected ticket is more than 0 we add that ticket to our order otherwise we remove that ticket from the order if it already exists.

Once user selects his tickets for the order he/she can order the tickets. On clicking Order button we call placeOrder action. With help of this we add all the relations and finally send the order information to the server. Code snippet is given below.

// components/public/ticket-list.js
    
placeOrder() {
   let order = this.get('order');
   let event = order.get('event');
   order.tickets.forEach(ticket => {
     let attendee = ticket.orderQuantity;
     let i;
     for (i = 0; i < attendee; i++) {
       order.attendees.addObject(this.store.createRecord('attendee', {
         firstname : 'John',
         lastname  : 'Doe',
         email     : '[email protected]',
         event,
         ticket
       }));
     }
   });
   this.sendAction('save');
 }

 

Here for each ticket placed under an order we create a dummy attendee related to ticket and event. And then we call save action to save all the models. Code snippet for save is given:

actions: {
    async save() {
      try {
        this.set('isLoading', true);
        let order = this.get('model.order');
        let attendees = order.get('attendees');
        await order.save();
        attendees.forEach(async attendee => {
          await attendee.save();
        });
        await order.save()
          .then(order => {
            this.get('notify').success(this.get('l10n').t('Order created.'));
            this.transitionToRoute('orders.new', order.id);
          });
      } catch (e) {
        this.get('notify').error(this.get('l10n').t('Oops something went wrong. Please try again'));
      }
    }
  }

 

Here we finally save all the models and transition to orders page to enable user fill the attendees details.

Resources:
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Implementing User Email Verification in Open Event Frontend

Open Event Server provides the functionality of user email verification after a user registers, but it was not implemented on Open Event Frontend until recently. For users, this meant they were still not able to verify themselves, even after receiving confirmation links in their inboxes, which were sent by the server. Thus, implementing it on frontend was crucial for a complete user registration workflow.

Since the server had already exposed an endpoint to perform the registration, all that was required on the frontend to be done was to make a call to this endpoint with the necessary data. The entire process can be summarized as follows:

  1. The recently registered user clicks on the verification link she receives on her email
  2. The above step opens the link, which is of the format http://fossasia.github.io/open-event-frontend/verify?token=
  3. As soon as the frontend server receives this request, it extracts the token from the URL query parameter
  4. The token is now sent to the backend server as a patch request
  5. The response of the above request confirms whether the user verification is successful or not, and an appropriate message is displayed

In the frontend code, the above algorithm is spread across 3 files: the router, verify route and verify controller. A new route named /verify was implemented for the user verification, and was registered in the project’s main router.js file. After that, in the verify route, the beforeModel() method is used to trigger the above algorithm before the page is loaded:

// in app/routes/verify.js

beforeModel(transition) {
this.controllerFor('verify').verify(transition.queryParams.token);
}

The main algorithm above is implemented in the verify controller:

// in app/controllers/verify.js
...
queryParams : ['token'],
token       : null,
success     : false,
error       : null,

verify(tokenVal) {
let payload = {
data: {
token: tokenVal
}
};
return this.get('loader')
.post('auth/verify-email', payload)
.then(() => {
this.set('success', true);
})
.catch(reason => {
this.set('error', reason);
this.set('success', false);
});
}
});

 

A template for displaying the success or failure messages to the user was also created. It uses the value of the success boolean set above to decide the message to be displayed to the user. The user registration workflow is now complete and the user sees the following message after clicking on the verification link she receives:

Screen Shot 2018-08-21 at 7.10.43 PM

Resources

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Implementing Badgename Update Functionality

Badgeyay project is divided into two parts i.e front-end with Ember JS and back-end with REST-API programmed in Python.

Badgeyay has many features related to enhancement in generation of badges. It gives choice of uploading data entries i.e by CSV or manually. There are options available for choosing Badge Background and font specifications. Now the next important thing from User perspective is that there should be a feature in My badges panel where user can see all badges & other details  and should be able to edit them if he want to, so moving forward with this feature I have implemented Badge Name update functionality in the frontend.

In this blog, I will be discussing how I implemented Update Badge Name functionality in my Pull Request so that the User can change his Badge Name  at any point of time in my badges panel.

Let’s get started and understand it step by step.

Step 1:

Create Badge Name component with Ember CLI.

$ ember g component badge-name

 

Step 2:

Make changes in Handlebar of Badge Name. We will be using semantic UI form for making the changes in Handlebars.

<form class="ui form" {{action 'updateBadgeName' on="change"}}>
    
class="ui icon input"> class="pen square icon"> {{input type="text" value=badge.badge_name }}
</form>

 

We have used action on submitting the Form for changing and updating the Badgename in Database.

Step 3:

We will now define the action in badge name JS file. We will also add the validations in Form so that empty form cannot be submitted to the server.

import Component from '@ember/component';
import Ember from 'ember';
const { inject } = Ember;
export default Component.extend({
  init() {
    this._super(...arguments);
  },
  notifications : inject.service('notification-messages'),
  actions       : {
    updateBadgeName() {
      this.get('sendBadgeName')(this.get('badge'));
    },
    didRender() {
      this.$('.ui.form')
        .form({
          inline : true,
          delay  : false,
          fields : {
            Name: {
              identifier : 'Name',
              rules      : [
                {
                  type   : 'empty',
                  prompt : 'Please enter a valid Badge Name'
                }
              ]
            }
          }
        });
    }
  }
});

 

Step 4:

We will now configure the controller to customize the action that we have defined above.

import Controller from '@ember/controller';
import { inject as service } from '@ember/service';
export default Controller.extend({
  routing       : service('-routing'),
  notifications : service('notification-messages'),
  actions       : {
    updateBadgeName(badge) {
      badge.save()
        .then(() => this.get('notifications').success('Badge Name Successfully Updated!', {
          autoClear     : true,
          clearDuration : 1500
        }));
    }
  }
});

 

Now, I am done with doing all the changes in Frontend.

Step 6:

Now run the Frontend & Backend to see the implemented changes.

  • My Badges Panel

Resources:

  1. Ember Docs –  Link
  2. Badgeyay Repository – Link
  3. Issue Link – Link
  4. Pull Request Link – Link
  5. Semantic UI –  LInk

 

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Implementing Different Alignment for Different Line

Badgeyay project is divided into two parts i.e front-end with Ember JS and back-end with REST-API programmed in Python.

Badgeyay comes with many features for customising the process of generation of Badges. Now to provide more freedom to the user in generation of badges, I have worked on feature which will provide user more freedom in choosing different text alignment  for different lines and create badges more creatively.

In this Blog, I will be discussing how I implemented different text alignment for Different Line in Badgeyay Backend in my Pull Request.

To implement different text alignment for Different Line feature,  first, the component in SVG that is determining the text alignment of the label has to be identified. The label that determines the text on the badge is the <text> label and within it, the label that determines the properties of the text is <tspan>. So mainly we need to alter the properties in the tspan.

The property that determines the font type for the badge is text-align and its default value is set to start(right alignment). If the property in the labels changed, then we can see the corresponding changes in the PDF generated from the svg.

Now the challenges were:

  • To Determine the text-align value from the frontend.
  • Using the same for the text-align in SVG..
  • Changing the built SVG accordingly.

In this Blog, I will be dealing with changing the SVG in Backend according to text-align property provided by the User in the Frontend.

 def change_text_align(self,
                          filename,
                          badge_size,
                          paper_size,
                          align_1, // Values from Frontend
                          align_2,
                          align_3,
                          align_4,
                          align_5):

        """
            Module to change Text Alignment of each badge line
                :param `filename` - svg file to modify.
                :param `align_1` - Text Alignment to be applied on first line
                :param `align_2` - Text Alignment to be applied on Second line
                :param `align_3` - Text Alignment to be applied on Third line
                :param `align_4` - Text Alignment to be applied on Fourth line
                :param `align_5` - Text Alignment to be applied on Fifth line
        """
// Storing the Values passed altogether in a list.
        align = [1, align_1, align_2, align_3, align_4, align_5]
// Selecting the dimension config based on the parameters passed in the function.
        dimensions = badge_config[paper_size][badge_size]
        if config.ENV == 'LOCAL':
            filename = 'static/badges/' + dimensions.badgeSize + 'on' + dimensions.paperSize + '.svg'
        else:
            filename = os.getcwd() + '/api/static/badges/' + dimensions.badgeSize + 'on' + dimensions.paperSize + '.svg'
        tree = etree.parse(open(os.path.join(self.APP_ROOT, filename), 'r'))
        element = tree.getroot()

        for idx in range(1, dimensions.badges + 1):

            for row in range(1, 6):
                //Selecting the text element with the ID
                _id = 'Person_color_{}_{}'.format(idx, row)
                path = element.xpath(("//*[@id='{}']").format(_id))[0]
                style_detail = path.get("style")
                style_detail = style_detail.split(";")

                for ind, i in enumerate(style_detail):
                    if i.split(':')[0] == 'text-align':
                        style_detail[ind] = "text-align:" + align[row]
                style_detail = ';'.join(style_detail)
                text_nodes = path.getchildren()
                path.set("text-align", style_detail)

                for t in text_nodes:
                    text_style_detail = t.get("style")
                    text_style_detail = text_style_detail.split(";")
 // Fill the text-align argument of the selected object by changing the value of text-align.
                    text_style_detail[-1] = "text-align:" + align[row]
                    text_style_detail = ";".join(text_style_detail)
                    t.set("style", text_style_detail)

        etree.ElementTree(element).write(filename, pretty_print=True)
        print("Text Alignment Saved!")

 

After all the changes, the Updated SVG is used for Badge Generation with different text-align embedded.

Now, we are done with implementation of different text alignment  for Different Line in Badgeyay Backend.

Resources:

  1. Extracting map information from the SVG –  Link
  2. LXML documentation – Link
  3. Parsing the SVG – Link
  4. Badgeyay Repository – Link
  5. Issue Link – Link
  6. Pull Request Link – Link
Continue Reading

Implementing Different Font Type for Different Line

Badgeyay project is divided into two parts i.e front-end with Ember JS and back-end with REST-API programmed in Python.

Badgeyay comes with many features for customising the process of generation of Badges. Now to provide more freedom to the user in generation of badges, I have worked on feature which will provide user more freedom in choosing font types for different lines and create badges more creatively.

In this Blog, I will be discussing how I implemented Different Font types for Different Line in Badgeyay Backend in my Pull Request.

To implement Different Font type for Different Line feature,  first, the component in SVG that is determining the font of the label has to be identified. The label that determines the text on the badge is the <text> label and within it, the label that determines the properties of the text is <tspan>. So mainly we need to alter the properties in the tspan.

The property that determines the font type for the badge is font-family and its default value is set to sans-serif. If the property in the labels changed, then we can see the corresponding changes in the PDF generated from the svg.

Now the challenges were:

  • To Determine the font-type value from the frontend.
  • Using the same for the font-type in SVG..
  • Changing the built SVG accordingly.

In this Blog, I will be dealing with changing the SVG in Backend according to Font type provided by the User in the Frontend.

  def change_font_family(self,
                           filename,
                           badge_size,
                           paper_size,
                           Font_1, // Values from Frontend
                           Font_2, 
                           font_3,
                           font_4,
                           font_5):

        """
            Module to change Font Family of each badge lines
                :param `filename` - svg file to modify.
                :param `font_1` - Family to be applied on first line
                :param `font_2` - Family to be applied on Second line
                :param `font_3` - Family to be applied on Third line
                :param `font_4` - Family to be applied on Fourth line
                :param `font_5` - Family to be applied on Fifth line
        """
// Storing the Values passed altogether in a list.
        font = [1, font_1, font_2, font_3, font_4, font_5]
// Selecting the dimension config based on the parameters passed in the function.
        dimensions = badge_config[paper_size][badge_size]
        if config.ENV == 'LOCAL':
            filename = 'static/badges/' + dimensions.badgeSize + 'on' + dimensions.paperSize + '.svg'
        else:
            filename = os.getcwd() + '/api/static/badges/' + dimensions.badgeSize + 'on' + dimensions.paperSize + '.svg'
        tree = etree.parse(open(os.path.join(self.APP_ROOT, filename), 'r'))
        element = tree.getroot()

        for idx in range(1, dimensions.badges + 1):

            for row in range(1, 6):
               //Selecting the text element with the ID
                _id = 'Person_color_{}_{}'.format(idx, row)
                path = element.xpath(("//*[@id='{}']").format(_id))[0]
                style_detail = path.get("style")
                style_detail = style_detail.split(";")

                for ind, i in enumerate(style_detail):
                    if i.split(':')[0] == 'font-family':
                        style_detail[ind] = "font-family:" + font[row]
                style_detail = ';'.join(style_detail)
                text_nodes = path.getchildren()
                path.set("font-family", style_detail)

                for t in text_nodes:
                    text_style_detail = t.get("style")
                    text_style_detail = text_style_detail.split(";")
  // Fill the font family argument of the selected object by changing the value of font-family.
                    text_style_detail[-1] = "font-family:" + font[row]
                    text_style_detail = ";".join(text_style_detail)
                    t.set("style", text_style_detail)

        etree.ElementTree(element).write(filename, pretty_print=True)
        print("Font Family Saved!")

 

After all the changes, the Updated SVG is used for Badge Generation with different font type embedded.

Now, we are done with implementation of Different Font type for Different Line in

Badgeyay Backend.

Resources:

  1. Extracting map information from the SVG –  Link
  2. LXML documentation – Link
  3. Parsing the SVG – Link
  4. Badgeyay Repository – Link
  5. Issue Link – Link
  6. Pull Request Link – Link
Continue Reading

Implementing Different Font Size for Different Line

Badgeyay project is divided into two parts i.e front-end with Ember JS and back-end with REST-API programmed in Python.

Badgeyay comes with many features for customising the process of generation of Badges. Now to provide more freedom to the user in generation of badges, I have worked on feature which will provide user more freedom in choosing font sizes for different lines and create badges more creatively.

In this Blog, I will be discussing how I implemented Different Font Size for Different Line in Badgeyay Backend in my Pull Request.

To implement Different Font Size for Different Line feature,  first, the component in SVG that is determining the font size of the label has to be identified. The label that determines the text on the badge is the <text> label and within it, the label that determines the properties of the text is <tspan>. So mainly we need to alter the properties in the tspan.

The property that determines the font size for the badge is font-size and its default value is set to 31.25 px. If the property in the labels changed, then we can see the corresponding changes in the PDF generated from the svg.

Now the challenges were:

  • To Determine the font-size value from the frontend.
  • Using the same for the font-size in SVG..
  • Changing the built SVG accordingly.

In this Blog, I will be dealing with changing the SVG in Backend according to Font Size provided by the User in the Frontend.

def change_font_size(self,
                         filename,
                         badge_size,
                         paper_size,
                         Font_size_1, // Values from Frontend
                         font_size_2,
                         font_size_3,
                         font_size_4,
                         font_size_5):

        """
   Module to change size of each badge lines
   :param `filename` - svg file to modify.
   :param `font_size_1` - Size to be applied on first line
   :param `font_size_2` - Size to be applied on Second line
   :param `font_size_3` - Size to be applied on Third line
   :param `font_size_4` - Size to be applied on Fourth line
   :param `font_size_5` - Size to be applied on Fifth line
        """
// Storing the Values passed altogether in a list.
        font_size = [1, font_size_1, font_size_2, font_size_3, font_size_4, font_size_5]
// Selecting the dimension config based on the parameters passed in the function.
        dimensions = badge_config[paper_size][badge_size]
        if config.ENV == 'LOCAL':
            filename = 'static/badges/' + dimensions.badgeSize + 'on' + dimensions.paperSize + '.svg'
        else:
            filename = os.getcwd() + '/api/static/badges/' + dimensions.badgeSize + 'on' + dimensions.paperSize + '.svg'
        tree = etree.parse(open(os.path.join(self.APP_ROOT, filename), 'r'))
        element = tree.getroot()

        for idx in range(1, dimensions.badges + 1):

            for row in range(1, 6):
                 //Selecting the text element with the ID
                _id = 'Person_color_{}_{}'.format(idx, row)                 path = element.xpath(("//*[@id='{}']").format(_id))[0]
                style_detail = path.get("style")
                style_detail = style_detail.split(";")

                for ind, i in enumerate(style_detail):
                    if i.split(':')[0] == 'font-size':
                        style_detail[ind] = "font-size:" + font_size[row]
                style_detail = ';'.join(style_detail)
                text_nodes = path.getchildren()
                path.set("font-size", style_detail)

                for t in text_nodes:
                    text_style_detail = t.get("style")
                    text_style_detail = text_style_detail.split(";")
   // Fill the font size argument of the selected object by changing the value of font-size.
                    text_style_detail[-1] = "font-size:" + font_size[row]
                    text_style_detail = ";".join(text_style_detail)
                    t.set("style", text_style_detail)

        etree.ElementTree(element).write(filename, pretty_print=True)
        print("Font Size Saved!")

 

 

After all the changes, the Updated SVG is used for Badge Generation with different font size embedded

Now, we are done with implementation of Different Font Size for Different Line in

Badgeyay Backend.

Resources:

  1. Extracting map information from the SVG –  Link
  2. LXML documentation – Link
  3. Parsing the SVG – Link
  4. Badgeyay Repository – Link
  5. Issue Link – Link

Pull Request Link – Link

Continue Reading
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