UI automated testing using Selenium in Badgeyay

With all the major functionalities packed into the badgeyay web application, it was time to add some automation testing to automate the review process in case of known errors and check if code contribution by contributors is not breaking anything. We decided to go with Selenium for our testing requirements.

What is Selenium?

Selenium is a portable software-testing framework for web applications. Selenium provides a playback (formerly also recording) tool for authoring tests without the need to learn a test scripting language. In other words, Selenium does browser automation:, Selenium tells a browser to click some element, populate and submit a form, navigate to a page and any other form of user interaction.

Selenium supports multiple languages including C#, Groovy, Java, Perl, PHP, Python, Ruby and Scala. Here, we are going to use Python (and specifically python 2.7).

First things first:
To install these package run this code on the CLI:

pip install selenium==2.40
pip install nose

Don’t forget to add them in the requirements.txt file

Web Browser:
We also need to have Firefox installed on your machine.

Writing the Test
An automated test automates what you’d do via manual testing – but it is done by the computer. This frees up time and allows you to do other things, as well as repeat your testing. The test code is going to run a series of instructions to interact with a web browser – mimicking how an actual end user would interact with an application. The script is going to navigate the browser, click a button, enter some text input, click a radio button, select a drop down, drag and drop, etc. In short, the code tests the functionality of the web application.

A test for the web page title:

import unittest
from selenium import webdriver

class SampleTest(unittest.TestCase):

    @classmethod
    def setUpClass(cls):
        cls.driver = webdriver.Firefox()
        cls.driver.get('http://badgeyay-dev.herokuapp.com/')

    def test_title(self):
        self.assertEqual(self.driver.title, 'Badgeyay')

    @classmethod
    def tearDownClass(cls):
        cls.driver.quit()

 

Run the test using nose test.py

Clicking the element
For our next test, we click the menu button, and check if the menu becomes visible.

elem = self.driver.find_element_by_css_selector(".custom-menu-content")
self.driver.find_element_by_css_selector(".glyphicon-th").click()
self.assertTrue(elem.is_displayed())

 

Uploading a CSV file:
For our next test, we upload a CSV file and see if a success message pops up.

def test_upload(self):
        Imagepath = os.path.abspath(os.path.join(os.getcwd(), 'badges/badge_1.png'))
        CSVpath = os.path.abspath(os.path.join(os.getcwd(), 'sample/vip.png.csv'))
        self.driver.find_element_by_name("file").send_keys(CSVpath)
        self.driver.find_element_by_name("image").send_keys(Imagepath)
        self.driver.find_element_by_css_selector("form .btn-primary").click()
        time.sleep(3)
        success = self.driver.find_element_by_css_selector(".flash-success")
        self.assertIn(u'Your badges has been successfully generated!', success.text)

 

The entire code can be found on: https://github.com/fossasia/badgeyay/tree/development/app/tests

We can also use the Phantom.js package along with Selenium for UI testing purposes without opening a web browser. We use this for badgeyay to run the tests for every commit in Travis CI which cannot open a program window.

Resources

Make Flask Fast and Reliable – Simple Steps

Flask is a microframework for Python, which is mostly used in web-backend development.There are projects in FOSSASIA that are using flask for development purposes such as Open Event Server, Query Server, Badgeyay. Optimization is indeed one of the most important steps for a successful software product. So, in this post some few off- the-hook tricks will be shown which will make your flask-app more fast and reliable.

Flask-Compress

  1. Flask-Compress is a python package which basically provides de-facto lossless compression  to your Flask application.
  2. Enough with the theory, now let’s understand the coding part:
    1. First install the module

2. Then for a basic setup

3.That’s it! All it takes is just few lines of code to make your flask app optimized .To know more about the module check out flask-compress module.

Requirements Directory

  1. A common practice amongst different FOSSASIA  projects which involves dividing requirements.txt files for development,testing as well as production.
  2. Basically when projects either use TRAVIS CI for testing or are deployed to Cloud Services like Heroku, there are some modules which are not really required at some places.  For example: gunicorn is only required for deployment purposes and not for development.
  3. So how about we have a separate directory wherein different .txt files are created for different purposes.
  4. Below is the image of file directory structure followed for requirements in badgeyay project.

  1. As you can see different .txt files are created for different purposes
    1. dev.txt – for development
    2. prod.txt – for production(i.e. deployment)
    3. test.txt – for testing.

Resources

FOSSASIA Summit 2018 Singapore – Call for Speakers

The FOSSASIA Open Tech Summit is Asia’s leading Open Technology conference for developers, companies, and IT professionals. The event will take place from Thursday, 22nd – Sunday, 25th March at the Lifelong Learning Institute in Singapore.

During four days developers, technologists, scientists, and entrepreneurs convene to collaborate, share information and learn about the latest in open technologies, including Artificial Intelligence software, DevOps, Cloud Computing, Linux, Science, Hardware and more. The theme of this year’s event is “Towards the Open Conversational Web“.

For our feature event we are looking for speaker submissions about Open Source for the following areas:

  • Artificial Intelligence, Algorithms, Search Engines, Cognitive Experts
  • Open Design, Hardware, Imaging
  • Science, Tech and Education
  • Kernel and Platform
  • Database
  • Cloud, Container, DevOps
  • Internet Society and Community
  • Open Event Solutions
  • Security and Privacy
  • Open Source in Business
  • Blockchain

There will be special events celebrating the 20th anniversary of the Open Source Initiative and its impact in Open Source business. An exhibition space is available for company and project stands.

Submission Guidelines

Please propose your session as early as possible and include a description of your session proposal that is as complete as possible. The description is of particular importance for the selection. Once accepted, speakers will receive a code for a speakers ticket. Speakers will receive a free speakers ticket and two standard tickets for their partner or friends. Sessions are accepted on an ongoing basis.

Submission Link: 2018.fossasia.org/speaker-registration

Dates & Deadlines

Please send us your proposal as soon as possible via the FOSSASIA Summit speaker registration.

Deadline for submissions: December 27th, 2017

Late submissions: Later submissions are possible, but early submissions have priority

Notification of acceptance: On an ongoing basis

Schedule Announced: January 20, 2018

FOSSASIA Open Tech Summit: March 22nd – 25th, 2018

Sessions and Tracks

Talks and Workshops

Talk slots are 20 minutes long plus 5-10 minutes for questions and answers. The idea is, that participants will use the sessions to get an idea of the work of others and are able to follow up in more detail in break-out areas, where they discuss more and start to work together. Speakers can also sign up for either a 1-hour long or a 2-hours workshop sessions. Longer sessions are possible in principle. Please tell us the proposed length of your session at the time of submission.

Lightning talks

You have some interesting ideas but do not want to submit a full talk? We suggest you go for a lightning talk which is a 5 minutes slot to present your idea or project. You are welcome to continue the discussion in breakout areas. There are tables and chairs to serve your get-togethers.

Stands and assemblies

We offer spaces in our exhibition area for companies, projects, installations, team gatherings and other fun activities. We are curious to know what you would like to make, bring or show. Please add details in the submission form.

Developer Rooms/Track Hosts

Get in touch early if you plan to organize a developer room at the event. FOSSASIA is also looking for team members who are interested to co-host and moderate tracks. Please sign up to become a host here.

Publication

Audio and video recordings of the lectures will be published in various formats under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) license. This license allows commercial use by media institutions as part of their reporting. If you do not wish for material from your lecture to be published or streamed, please let us know in your submission.

Sponsorship & Contact

If you would like to sponsor FOSSASIA or have any questions, please contact us via [email protected].

Suggested Topics

  • Artificial Intelligence (SUSI.AI, Algorithms, Cognitive Expert Systems AI on a Chip)
  • Hardware (Architectures, Maker Culture, Small Devices)
  • 20 years Impact of Open Source in Business
  • DevOps (Continuous Delivery, Lean IT, Moving at Cloud-speed)
  • Networking (Software Defined Networking, OpenFlow, Satellite Communication)
  • Security (Coding, Configuration, Testing, Malware)
  • Cloud & Microservices (Containers – Libraries, Runtimes, Composition; Kubernetes; Docker, Distributed Services)
  • Databases (Location-aware and Mapping, Replication and Clustering, Data Warehousing, NoSQL)
  • Science and Applications (Pocket Science Lab, Neurotech, Biohacking, Science Education)
  • Business Development (Open Source Business Models, Startups, Kickstarter Campaigns)
  • Internet of Everything (Smart Home, Medical Systems, Environmental Systems)
  • Internet Society and Culture (Collaborative Development, Community, Advocacy, Government, Governance, Legal)​
  • Kernel Development and Linux On The Desktop (Meilix, Light Linux systems, Custom Linux Generator)
  • Open Design and Libre Art (Open Source Design)
  • Open Event (Event Management systems, Ticketing solutions, Scheduling, Event File Formats)

Links

Speaker Registration and Proposal Submission:
2018.fossasia.org/speaker-registration

FOSSASIA Summit: 2018.fossasia.org

FOSSASIA Summit 2017: Event Wrap-Up

FOSSASIA Photos: flickr.com/photos/fossasia/

FOSSASIA Videos: Youtube FOSSASIA

FOSSASIA on Twitter: twitter.com/fossasia

Using Inkscape to create SVG Files for Background of Event Badges in Badgeyay

Inkscape is a free and open-source vector graphics editor. I used it in the FOSSASIA Badgeyay repository whose main purpose is to create badges for the event created using open-event. Badges were created in Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) because of its advantages over JPEG, png etc. such as: scalability, Search Engine Optimization (SEO) friendly, easy editing ability (as it gets saved in an XML format) and resolution independence.

My task (issue #20) was to create the background in SVG format so that it can be edited using XML file. Aim was to create the background in such a way so that we just have to find and replace the color code to see the color change in the image/background. Following background was to be reproduced in SVG format using Inkscape whose color can be edited using a text editor.

badge

This was achieved using Inkscape (as suggested in the issue itself) which let us create an SVG file. I created 2 layers, 1 for plain background, and the other containing the triangles of Voronoi Diagram. General steps are included in this awesome video tutorial – AbstractBackground.

I found this quite helpful in understanding the interface of Inkscape. After following this tutorial, I had to do changes as follows:

  • Layer 1 rectangle was made using mesh, giving 4 different colors at corners. I set these colors as grey with different opacity/alpha factor.
  • Then just like in the video, I created a small circular object, set it to ‘path to object’, made duplicates of them, scattered them on the rectangle of 1st layer.
  • Used extensions menu to use ‘voronoi diagram‘, and then applied this to the selected circles.
  • Then I removed these circles, ungrouped all the triangles formed , changed their color, just by picking with the background (which was grey — with different opacities!). Grouped them together again, removed the lines which were separating the triangles by setting stroke to none.
  • Now all one have to do is change the color of 1st layer’ rectangle, and the final image/background will get changed .

This change of color can be changed using a text editor too. I just had to find layer 1 rectangle in the XML tree, replace the ‘fill’ attribute with the required color code.

This was achieved using INKSCAPE.

badge background

Now using text editor (here Sublime Text 3) , find layer 1, and change ‘fill’ value of rect with say ‘37C871’.

 <g
      inkscape:label="Layer 1"
      inkscape:groupmode="layer"
      id="layer1"
      style="display:inline;opacity:1">
     <rect
        id="rect4504"
        width="141.3569"
        height="200.82413"
        x="-63.25676"
        y="-14.052279"
        style="opacity:1;fill:#37C871;fill-opacity:1;stroke:url(#linearGradient2561);stroke-width:0.57644272" />
   </g>

changed badge background color
Then again opening the svg file, gives us the output as :

Results can be seen in my Pull request #152 which eventually got merged.

Using the similar background and adding logo of FOSSASIA on the top, also adding editable Headings like ‘VIP’, ‘BUSINESS PASS’  was done further in #PR167.

If you want to contribute to FOSSASIA/badgeyay, you can create an issue here.

Resources:

Handling Data Requests in Open Event Organizer Android App

Open Event Organizer is a client side application of Open Event API Server created for event organizers and entry managers. The app maintains a local database and syncs it with the server when required. I will be talking about handling data requests in the app in this blog.

The app uses ReactiveX for all the background tasks including data accessing. When a user requests any data, there are two possible ways the app can perform. The one where app fetches the data directly from the local database maintained and another where it requests data from the server. The app has to decide one of the ways. In the Organizer app, AbstractObservableBuilder class takes care of this. The relevant code is:

final class AbstractObservableBuilder<T> {

   private final IUtilModel utilModel;
   private boolean reload;
   private Observable<T> diskObservable;
   private Observable<T> networkObservable;

   ...
   ...

   @NonNull
   private Callable<Observable<T>> getReloadCallable() {
       return () -> {
           if (reload)
               return Observable.empty();
           else
               return diskObservable
                   .doOnNext(item -> Timber.d("Loaded %s From Disk on Thread %s",
                       item.getClass(), Thread.currentThread().getName()));
       };
   }

   @NonNull
   private Observable<T> getConnectionObservable() {
       if (utilModel.isConnected())
           return networkObservable
               .doOnNext(item -> Timber.d("Loaded %s From Network on Thread %s",
                   item.getClass(), Thread.currentThread().getName()));
       else
           return Observable.error(new Throwable(Constants.NO_NETWORK));
   }

   @NonNull
   private <V> ObservableTransformer<V, V> applySchedulers() {
       return observable -> observable
           .subscribeOn(Schedulers.io())
           .observeOn(AndroidSchedulers.mainThread());
   }

   @NonNull
   public Observable<T> build() {
       if (diskObservable == null || networkObservable == null)
           throw new IllegalStateException("Network or Disk observable not provided");

       return Observable
               .defer(getReloadCallable())
               .switchIfEmpty(getConnectionObservable())
               .toList()
               .flatMap(items -> diskObservable.toList())
               .flattenAsObservable(items -> items)
               .compose(applySchedulers());
   }
}

 

DiskObservable is a data request to the local database and networkObservable is a data request to the server. The build function decides which one to use and returns a correct observable accordingly. The class object takes a boolean field reload which is used to decide which observable to subscribe. If reload is true, that means the user wants data from the server, hence networkObservable is returned to subscribe. Also switchIfEmpty in the build method checks whether the data fetched using diskObservable is empty, if found empty it switches the observable to the networkObservable to subscribe.

This class object is used for every data access in the app. For example, this is a code snippet of the gettEvents method in EventRepository class.

@Override
public Observable<Event> getEvents(boolean reload) {
   Observable<Event> diskObservable = Observable.defer(() ->
       databaseRepository.getAllItems(Event.class)
   );

   Observable<Event> networkObservable = Observable.defer(() ->
       eventService.getEvents(JWTUtils.getIdentity(getAuthorization()))
           ...
           ...
           .flatMapIterable(events -> events));

   return new AbstractObservableBuilder<Event>(utilModel)
       .reload(reload)
       .withDiskObservable(diskObservable)
       .withNetworkObservable(networkObservable)
       .build();
}

 

Links:
1. Documentation of ReactiveX API
2. Github repository link of RxJava – Reactive Extension for JVM

Automatic Signing and Publishing of Android Apps from Travis

As I discussed about preparing the apps in Play Store for automatic deployment and Google App Signing in previous blogs, in this blog, I’ll talk about how to use Travis Ci to automatically sign and publish the apps using fastlane, as well as how to upload sensitive information like signing keys and publishing JSON to the Open Source repository. This method will be used to publish the following Android Apps:

Current Project Structure

The example project I have used to set up the process has the following structure:

It’s a normal Android Project with some .travis.yml and some additional bash scripts in scripts folder. The update-apk.sh file is standard app build and repo push file found in FOSSASIA projects. The process used to develop it is documented in previous blogs. First, we’ll see how to upload our keys to the repo after encrypting them.

Encrypting keys using Travis

Travis provides a very nice documentation on encrypting files containing sensitive information, but a crucial information is buried below the page. As you’d normally want to upload two things to the repo – the app signing key, and API JSON file for release manager API of Google Play for Fastlane, you can’t do it separately by using standard file encryption command for travis as it will override the previous encrypted file’s secret. In order to do so, you need to create a tarball of all the files that need to be encrypted and encrypt that tar instead. Along with this, before you need to use the file, you’ll have to decrypt in in the travis build and also uncompress it for use.

So, first install Travis CLI tool and login using travis login (You should have right access to the repo and Travis CI in order to encrypt the files for it)

Then add the signing key and fastlane json in the scripts folder. Let’s assume the names of the files are key.jks and fastlane.json

Then, go to scripts folder and run this command to create a tar of these files:

tar cvf secrets.tar fastlane.json key.jks

 

secrets.tar will be created in the folder. Now, run this command to encrypt the file

travis encrypt-file secrets.tar

 

A new file secrets.tar.enc will be created in the folder. Now delete the original files and secrets tar so they do not get added to the repo by mistake. The output log will show the the command for decryption of the file to be added to the .travis.yml file.

Decrypting keys using Travis

But if we add it there, the keys will be decrypted for each commit on each branch. We want it to happen only for master branch as we only require publishing from that branch. So, we’ll create a bash script prep-key.sh for the task with following content

#!/bin/sh
set -e

export DEPLOY_BRANCH=${DEPLOY_BRANCH:-master}

if [ "$TRAVIS_PULL_REQUEST" != "false" -o "$TRAVIS_REPO_SLUG" != "iamareebjamal/android-test-fastlane" -o "$TRAVIS_BRANCH" != "$DEPLOY_BRANCH" ]; then
    echo "We decrypt key only for pushes to the master branch and not PRs. So, skip."
    exit 0
fi

openssl aes-256-cbc -K $encrypted_4dd7_key -iv $encrypted_4dd7_iv -in ./scripts/secrets.tar.enc -out ./scripts/secrets.tar -d
tar xvf ./scripts/secrets.tar -C scripts/

 

Of course, you’ll have to change the commands and arguments according to your need and repo. Specially, the decryption command keys ID

The script checks if the repo and branch are correct, and the commit is not of a PR, then decrypts the file and extracts them in appropriate directory

Before signing the app, you’ll need to store the keystore password, alias and key password in Travis Environment Variables. Once you have done that, you can proceed to signing the app. I’ll assume the variable names to be $STORE_PASS, $ALIAS and $KEY_PASS respectively

Signing App

Now, come to the part in upload-apk.sh script where you have the unsigned release app built. Let’s assume its name is app-release-unsigned.apk.Then run this command to sign it

cp app-release-unsigned.apk app-release-unaligned.apk
jarsigner -verbose -tsa http://timestamp.comodoca.com/rfc3161 -sigalg SHA1withRSA -digestalg SHA1 -keystore ../scripts/key.jks -storepass $STORE_PASS -keypass $KEY_PASS app-release-unaligned.apk $ALIAS

 

Then run this command to zipalign the app

${ANDROID_HOME}/build-tools/25.0.2/zipalign -v -p 4 app-release-unaligned.apk app-release.apk

 

Remember that the build tools version should be the same as the one specified in .travis.yml

This will create an apk named app-release.apk

Publishing App

This is the easiest step. First install fastlane using this command

gem install fastlane

 

Then run this command to publish the app to alpha channel on Play Store

fastlane supply --apk app-release.apk --track alpha --json_key ../scripts/fastlane.json --package_name com.iamareebjamal.fastlane

 

You can always configure the arguments according to your need. Also notice that you have to provide the package name for Fastlane to know which app to update. This can also be stored as an environment variable.

This is all for this blog, you can read more about travis CLI, fastlane features and signing process in these links below:

Keeping Order of tickets in Event Wizard in Sync with API on Open Event Frontend

This blog article will illustrate how the various tickets are stored and displayed in order the event organiser decides  on  Open Event Frontend and also, how they are kept in sync with the backend.

First we will take a look at how the user is able to control the order of the tickets using the ticket widget.

{{#each tickets as |ticket index|}}
  {{widgets/forms/ticket-input ticket=ticket
  timezone=data.event.timezone
  canMoveUp=(not-eq index 0)
  canMoveDown=(not-eq ticket.position (dec
  data.event.tickets.length))
  moveTicketUp=(action 'moveTicket' ticket 'up')
  moveTicketDown=(action 'moveTicket' ticket 'down')
  removeTicket=(confirm 'Are you sure you  wish to delete this 
  ticket ?' (action 'removeTicket' ticket))}}
{{/each}}

The canMoveUp and canMoveDown are dynamic properties and are dependent upon the current positions of the tickets in the tickets array.  These properties define whether the up or down arraow or both should be visible alongside the ticket to trigger the moveTicket action.

There is an attribute called position in the ticket model which is responsible for storing the position of the ticket on the backend. Hence it is necessary that the list of the ticket available should always be ordered by position. However, it should be kept in mind, that even if the position attribute of the tickers is changed, it will not actually change the indices of the ticket records in the array fetched from the API. And since we want the ticker order in sync with the backend, i.e. user shouldn’t have to refresh to see the changes in ticket order, we are going to return the tickets via a computed function which sorts them in the required order.

tickets: computed('data.event.tickets.@each.isDeleted', 'data.event.tickets.@each.position', function() {
   return this.get('data.event.tickets').sortBy('position').filterBy('isDeleted', false);
 })

The sortBy method ensures that the tickets are always ordered and this computed property thus watches the position of each of the tickets to look out for any changes. Now we can finally define the moveTicket action to enable modification of position for tickets.

moveTicket(ticket, direction) {
     const index = ticket.get('position');
     const otherTicket = this.get('data.event.tickets').find(otherTicket => otherTicket.get('position') === (direction === 'up' ? (index - 1) : (index + 1)));
     otherTicket.set('position', index);
     ticket.set('position', direction === 'up' ? (index - 1) : (index + 1));
   }

The moveTicket action takes two arguments, ticket and direction. It temporarily stores the position of the current ticket and the position of the ticket which needs to be swapped with the current ticket.Based on the direction the positions are swapped. Since the position of each of the tickets is being watched by the tickets computed array, the change in order becomes apparent immediately.

Now when the User will trigger the save request, the positions of each of the tickets will be updated via a PATCH or POST (if the ticket is new) request.

Also, the positions of all the tickets maybe affected while adding a new ticket or deleting an existing one. In case of a new ticket, the position of the new ticket should be initialised while creating it and it should be below all the other tickets.

addTicket(type, position) {
     const salesStartDateTime = moment();
     const salesEndDateTime = this.get('data.event.startsAt');
     this.get('data.event.tickets').pushObject(this.store.createRecord('ticket', {
       type,
       position,
       salesStartsAt : salesStartDateTime,
       salesEndsAt   : salesEndDateTime
     }));
   }

Deleting a ticket requires updating positions of all the tickets below the deleted ticket. All of the positions need to be shifted one place up.

removeTicket(deleteTicket) {
     const index = deleteTicket.get('position');
     this.get('data.event.tickets').forEach(ticket => {
       if (ticket.get('position') > index) {
         ticket.set('position', ticket.get('position') - 1);
       }
     });
     deleteTicket.deleteRecord();
   }

The tickets whose position is to be updated are filtered by comparison of their position from the position of the deleted ticket.

Resources

Implementing Order Statistics API on Tickets Route in Open Event Frontend

The order statistics API endpoints are used to display the statistics related to tickets, orders, and sales. It contains the details about the total number of orders, the total number of tickets sold and the amount of the sales. It also gives the detailed information about the pending, expired, placed and completed orders, tickets, and sales.

This article will illustrate how the order statistics can be displayed using the Order Statistics API in Open Event Frontend. The primary end point of Open Event API with which we are concerned with for statistics is

GET /v1/events/{event_identifier}/order-statistics

First, we need to create a model for the order statistics, which will have the fields corresponding to the API, so we proceed with the ember CLI command:

ember g model order-statistics-tickets

Next, we need to define the model according to the requirements. The model needs to extend the base model class. The code for the model looks like this:

import attr from 'ember-data/attr';
import ModelBase from 'open-event-frontend/models/base';

export default ModelBase.extend({
  orders  : attr(),
  tickets : attr(),
  sales   : attr()
});

As we need to display the statistics related to orders, tickets, and sales so we have their respective variables inside the model which will fetch and store the details from the API.

Now, after creating a model, we need to make an API call to get the details. This can be done using the following:

return this.modelFor('events.view').query('orderStatistics', {});

Since the tickets route is nested inside the event.view route so, first we are getting the model for event.view route and then we’re querying order statistics from the model.

The complete code can be seen here.

Now, we need to call the model inside the template file to display the details. To fetch the total orders we can write like this

{{model.orders.total}}

 

In a similar way, the total sales can be displayed like this.

{{model.sales.total}}

 

And total tickets can be displayed like this

{{model.tickets.total}}

 

If we want to fetch other details like the pending sales or completed orders then the only thing we need to replace is the total attribute. In place of total, we can add any other attribute depending on the requirement. The complete code of the template can be seen here.

The UI for the order statistics on the tickets route looks like this.

Fig. 1: The user interface for displaying the statistics

The complete source code can be seen here.

Resources:

Implementing Pages API in Open Event Frontend

The pages endpoints are used to create static pages which such as about page or any other page that doesn’t need to be updated frequently and only a specific content is to be shown. This article will illustrate how the pages can be added or removed from the /admin/content/pages route using the pages API in Open Event Frontend. The primary end point of Open Event API with which we are concerned with for pages is

GET /v1/pages

First, we need to create a model for the pages, which will have the fields corresponding to the API, so we proceed with the ember CLI command:

ember g model page

Next, we need to define the model according to the requirements. The model needs to extend the base model class. The code for the page model looks like this:

import attr from 'ember-data/attr';
import ModelBase from 'open-event-frontend/models/base';

export default ModelBase.extend({
  name        : attr('string'),
  title       : attr('string'),
  url         : attr('string'),
  description : attr('string'),
  language    : attr('string'),
  index       : attr('number', { defaultValue: 0 }),
  place       : attr('string')
});

As the page will have name, title, url which will tell the URL of the page, the language, the description, index and the place of the page where it has to be which can be either a footer or an event.

The complete code for the model can be seen here.

Now, after creating a model, we need to make an API call to get and post the pages created. This can be done using the following:

return this.get('store').findAll('page');

The above line will check the store and find all the pages which have been cached in and if there is no record found then it will make an API call and cache the records in the store so that when called it can return it immediately.

Since in the case of pages we have multiple options like creating a new page, updating a new page, deleting an existing page etc. For creating and updating the page we have a form which has the fields required by the API to create the page.  The UI of the form looks like this.

Fig. 1: The user interface of the form used to create the page.

Fig. 2: The user interface of the form used to update and delete the already existing page

The code for the above form can be seen here.

Now, if we click the items which are present in the sidebar on the left, it enables us to edit and update the page by displaying the information stored in the form and then the details be later updated on the server by clicking the Update button. If we want to delete the form we can do so using the delete button which first shows a pop up to confirm whether we actually want to delete it or not. The code for displaying the delete confirmation pop up looks like this.

<button class="ui red button" 
{{action (confirm (t 'Are you sure you would like to delete this page?') (action 'deletePage' data))}}>
{{t 'Delete'}}</button>

 

The code to delete the page looks like this

deletePage(data) {
    if (!this.get('isCreate')) {
      data.destroyRecord();
      this.set('isFormOpen', false);
    }
  }

In the above piece of code, we’re checking whether the form is in create mode or update mode and if it’s in create mode then we can destroy the record and then close the form.

The UI for the pop up looks like this.

Fig.3: The user interface for delete confirmation pop up

The code for the entire process of page creation to deletion can be checked here

To conclude, this is how we efficiently do the process of page creation, updating and deletion using the Open-Event-Orga pages API  ensuring that there is no unnecessary API call to fetch the data and no code duplication.

Resources:

Using Android Palette with Glide in Open Event Organizer Android App

Open Event Organizer is an Android Application for the Event Organizers and Entry Managers. The core feature of the App is to scan a QR code from the ticket to validate an attendee’s check in. Other features of the App are to display an overview of sales, ticket management and basic editing in the Event Details. Open Event API Server acts as a backend for this App. The App uses Navigation Drawer for navigation in the App. The side drawer contains menus, event name, event start date and event image in the header. Event name and date is shown just below the event image in a palette. For a better visibility Android Palette is used which extracts prominent colors from images. The App uses Glide to handle image loading hence GlidePalette library is used for palette generation which integrates Android Palette with Glide. I will be talking about the implementation of GlidePalette in the App in this blog.

The App uses Data Binding so the image URLs are directly passed to the XML views in the layouts and the image loading logic is implemented in the BindingAdapter class. The image loading code looks like:

GlideApp
   .with(imageView.getContext())
   .load(Uri.parse(url))
   ...
   .into(imageView);

 

So as to implement palette generation for event detail label, it has to be implemented with the event image loading. GlideApp takes request listener which implements methods on success and failure where palette can be generated using the bitmap loaded. With GlidePalette most of this part is covered in the library itself. It provides GlidePalette class which is a sub class of GlideApp request listener which is passed to the GlideApp using the method listener. In the App, BindingAdapter has a method named bindImageWithPalette which takes a view container, image url, a placeholder drawable and the ids of imageview and palette. The relevant code is:

@BindingAdapter(value = {"paletteImageUrl", "placeholder", "imageId", "paletteId"}, requireAll = false)
public static void bindImageWithPalette(View container, String url, Drawable drawable, int imageId, int paletteId) {
   ImageView imageView = (ImageView) container.findViewById(imageId);
   ViewGroup palette = (ViewGroup) container.findViewById(paletteId);

   if (TextUtils.isEmpty(url)) {
       if (drawable != null)
           imageView.setImageDrawable(drawable);
       palette.setBackgroundColor(container.getResources().getColor(R.color.grey_600));
       for (int i = 0; i < palette.getChildCount(); i++) {
           View child = palette.getChildAt(i);
           if (child instanceof TextView)
               ((TextView) child).setTextColor(Color.WHITE);
       }
       return;
   }
   GlidePalette<Drawable> glidePalette = GlidePalette.with(url)
       .use(GlidePalette.Profile.MUTED)
       .intoBackground(palette)
       .crossfade(true);

   for (int i = 0; i < palette.getChildCount(); i++) {
       View child = palette.getChildAt(i);
       if (child instanceof TextView)
           glidePalette
               .intoTextColor((TextView) child, GlidePalette.Swatch.TITLE_TEXT_COLOR);
   }
   setGlideImage(imageView, url, drawable, null, glidePalette);
}

 

The code is pretty obvious. The method checks passed URL for nullability. If null, it sets the placeholder drawable to the image view and default colors to the text views and the palette. The GlidePalette object is generated using the initializer method with which takes the image URL. The request is passed to the method setGlideImage which loads the image and passes the GlidePalette to the GlideApp as a listener. Accordingly, the palette is generated and the colors are set to the label and text views accordingly. The container view in the XML layout looks like:

<LinearLayout
   android:layout_width="match_parent"
   android:layout_height="wrap_content"
   android:orientation="vertical"
   app:paletteImageUrl="@{ event.largeImageUrl }"
   app:placeholder="@{ @drawable/header }"
   app:imageId="@{ R.id.image }"
   app:paletteId="@{ R.id.eventDetailPalette }">

 

Links:
1. Documentation for Glide Image Loading Library
2. GlidePalette Github Repository
3. Android Palette Official Documentation