Creating Forms and their validation using Semantic UI in Badgeyay

Badgeyay project is now divided into two parts i.e front-end of Ember JS and back-end with REST-API programmed in Python.

After a discussion, we have finalized to go with Semantic UI framework which uses simple, common language for parts of interface elements, and familiar patterns found in natural languages for describing elements. Semantic allows to build beautiful websites fast, with concise HTML, intuitive javascript and simplified debugging, helping make front-end development a delightful experience. Semantic is responsively designed allowing a web application to scale on multiple devices. Semantic is production ready and partnered with Ember framework which means we can integrate it with Ember frameworks to organize our UI layer alongside our application logic.

In this blog, I will be discussing how I added Log In and Signup Forms and their validations using Semantic UI for badgeyay frontend in my Pull Request.

Let’s get started and understand it step by step.

Step 1:

Generate ember components of Login and Sign up by using the following command :

$ ember generate component forms/login-form
$ ember generate component forms/signup-form

 

Step 2:

Generate Login and Sign up route by following commands.

$ ember generate route login
$ ember generate route signup 

 

Step 3:

Generate Login and Sign up controller by following commands.

$ ember generate controller login
$ ember generate controller signup

 

Step 4:

Now we have set up the components, routes, and controllers for adding the forms for login and Sign up. Now let’s start writing HTML in handlebars, adding validations and implementing validations for the form components. In this blog, I will be sharing the code of Login form and actions related to logging In of user. You can check the whole code my Pull Request which I have made for adding these Forms.

Step 4.1: Creating a Login Form

<div class="ui hidden divider"></div>
<div class="ui raised segment">
    <div class="ui stackable column doubling centered grid">
        <div class="ui middle aligned center aligned grid">
            <div class="row" >
                <div class="column">
                    <h1 class="ui orange header">
                        Welcome back !
                        <div class="sub header">We're happy  helping you get beautiful name badges.</div>
                    </h1>
                    <div class="ui hidden divider"></div>
                    <form class="ui form">
                        <div class="ui stacked element">
                            <div class="field required">
                                <div class="ui left icon input">
                                    <i class="mail icon"></i>
                                    {{input type="text" value=email name="email" placeholder="E-mail address"}}
                                </div>
                            </div>
                            <div class="field required">
                                <div class="ui left icon input">
                                    <i class="lock icon"></i>
                                    {{input type="password" value=password name="password" placeholder="Password"}}
                                </div>
                            </div>
                            <button class="ui button orange fluid" style="margin-bottom: 10px;" {{ action 'logIn' 'password' }}>Log In</button>
                            <a href="#" class="text muted"> Forgot your password ?</a>
                            <div class="ui divider"></div>
                            <a href="{{href-to 'signup'}}" class="text muted weight-800">Don't have an account yet? Signup</a>
                        </div>
                    </form>
                    <div class="ui horizontal divider">
                        Or
                    </div>
                    <h1 class="ui header">
                        <div class="sub header">Login with</div>
                    </h1>
                </div>
            </div>
            <div class="three column row">
                <div class="column">
                    <div class="ui vertical animated red button fluid" {{ action 'logIn' 'google' }}>
                        <div class="hidden content">Google</div>
                        <div class="visible content">
                            <i class="google plus icon"></i>
                        </div>
                    </div>
                </div>
                <div class="column">
                    <div class="ui vertical animated violet button fluid" tabindex="0" {{ action 'logIn' 'facebook' }}>
                        <div class="hidden content">Facebook</div>
                        <div class="visible content">
                            <i class="facebook f icon"></i>
                        </div>
                    </div>
                </div>
                <div class="column">
                    <div class="ui vertical animated blue button fluid" tabindex="0" {{ action 'logIn' 'twitter' }}>
                        <div class="hidden content">Twitter</div>
                        <div class="visible content">
                            <i class="twitter icon"></i>
                        </div>
                    </div>
                </div>
            </div>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

 

Step 4.2: Adding Form Validations

import Component from '@ember/component';

export default Component.extend({
  init() {
    this._super(...arguments);
  },

  actions: {
    logIn(provider) {
      let email = '';
      let password = '';
      if (provider == 'password') {
        email = this.get('email');
        password = this.get('password');
      }
      this.get('login')(provider, email, password);
    },

    logOut() {
      this.get('session').close();
    }
  },

  didRender() {
    this.$('.ui.form')
      .form({
        inline : true,
        delay  : false,
        fields : {
          email: {
            identifier : 'email',
            rules      : [
              {
                type   : 'email',
                prompt : 'Please enter a valid email address'
              }
            ]
          },
          password: {
            identifier : 'password',
            rules      : [
              {
                type   : 'empty',
                prompt : 'Please enter a password'
              }
            ]
          }
        }
      })
    ;
  }
});

 

Step 4.3: Adding Login Actions

import Ember from 'ember';

import Controller from '@ember/controller';

const { inject } = Ember;

export default Controller.extend({
  session: inject.service(),
  beforeModel() {
    return this.get('session').fetch().catch(function() {});
  },
  actions: {
    login(provider, email, password) {
      const that = this;
      if (provider === 'password') {
        this.get('session').open('firebase', {
          provider: 'password',
          email,
          password
        }).then(function(userData) {
          console.log(userData);
          that.transitionToRoute('/');
        }).catch(function(err) {
          console.log(err.message);
        });
      } else {
        const that = this;
        this.get('session').open('firebase', {
          provider
        }).then(function(userData) {
          console.log(userData);
          that.transitionTo('/');
        }).catch(function(err) {
          console.log(err.message);
        });
      }
    },

    logOut() {
      this.get('session').close();
    }
  }
});

 

I have made Login form and in a similar way I implemented the SignUp form and complete code can be seen in my Pull Request.

Now, we are done with writing HTML in handlebars, adding validations and implementing validations for the form components.

Step 5:

Now run the server to see the implemented changes by the following command.

$ ember serve

 

It will show like this :

Navigate to localhost to see the changes.

  • Login Form

  • Sign up  Form

  • Form Validations

Now we are all done with setting up Log In and Signup Forms and their validations using Semantic UI in the badgeyay repository.

This is how I have added Log In and Signup Forms and their validations in my Pull Request.

Resources:

  • Semantic UI Docs – Link
  • Ember Docs – Link

Making Shapes with PSLab Oscilloscope

Looking back to history, the first ever video game was ‘Pong’ which was played on an analog oscilloscope with a very small screen. Oscilloscopes are not made to play video games, but by just tinkering around its basic functionality which is display waveforms, we can do plenty of cool things. PSLab device also has an oscilloscope; in fact it’s a four channel oscilloscope.

This blog post will show you how the oscilloscope in PSLab is not just a cheap oscilloscope but it has lots of functionalities an industry grade oscilloscope has (except for the bandwidth limitation to a maximum of 2 MHz)

To produce shapes like above figures, we are using another instrument available in PSLab. That is ‘Waveform Generator’. PSLab Waveform Generator can generate three different waveforms namely Sine waves, Triangular waves and Square waves ranging from 5 Hz to 5 kHz.

To get started, first connect two jumper wires between SI1-CH1 and SI2-CH2 pins. We needn’t worry about ground pins as they are already internally connected. Now it’s time to open up the PSLab oscilloscope. Here we are going to utilize two channels for this activity and they will be CH1 and CH2. Check the tick boxes in front of ‘Chan 1’ and ‘Chan 2’ and set ‘Range’ to “+/-4V” to have the maximum visibility filling the whole screen with the waveform.

The shapes are drawn using a special mode called ‘X-Y Mode’ in PSLab oscilloscope. In this mode, two channels will be plotted against their amplitudes at every point in time.

As it is already mentioned that PSLab can generate many waveform types and also they can have different phase angles relative to each other. They can have different independent frequencies. With all these combinations, we can tweak the settings in Waveform Generator to produce different cool shapes in PSLab oscilloscope.

These shapes can vary from basic geometric shapes such as circle, square, rectangle to complicated shapes such as rhombus, ellipse and polynomial curves.

Circle

A circular shape can be made by generating two sine waves having the same frequency but with a phase difference of 90 degrees or 270 degrees between the two wave forms.

 

 
 

 


Square

Square shape can be made by generating two triangular waveforms again having the same frequency but with a phase difference of either 90 degrees or 270 degrees between the two.

 

 

 
 


Rectangle

Similar to creating a Square, by having the same frequency for both triangular waveforms but a different phase angle greater than or less than 90 degree will do the trick.

 

 

 
 


Rhombus

Keeping the waveform settings same for the rectangle, by changing the amplitude of the SI1 waveform using the knob we can generate a rhombic shape on the XY graph plot.

 

 

 
 


Ellipse

Generating ellipse is also similar to creating a rhombus. But here we are using sine waves instead of triangular waves. By changing the amplitude of SI1 using the knob we can change the curvature.

 

 

 


Helix

Helix or spiral shape can be generated using two sine waves having same phase but two different frequencies. Frequencies better be integer multiples of the smaller frequency to  have a steady shape.

 

 

 


Parabola

Parabolic shapes can be generated by mixing up triangular waves with sine waves with different phase angles.

 

 

 

 
 

More random shapes


References:

https://www.aps.org/publications/apsnews/200810/physicshistory.cfm

Implementing Database Migrations to Badgeyay

Badgeyay project is divided into two parts i.e front-end of Ember JS and back-end with REST-API programmed in Python.

We have integrated PostgreSQL as the object-relational database in Badgeyay and we are using SQLAlchemy SQL Toolkit and Object Relational Mapper tools for working with databases and Python. As we have Flask microframework for Python, so we are having Flask-SQLAlchemy as an extension for Flask that adds support for SQLAlchemy to work with the ORM.

One of the challenging jobs is to manage changes we make to the models and propagate these changes in the database. For this purpose, I have added Added Migrations to Flask SQLAlchemy for handling database changes using the Flask-Migrate extension.

In this blog, I will be discussing how I added Migrations to Flask SQLAlchemy for handling Database changes using the Flask-Migrate extension in my Pull Request.

First, Let’s understand Database Models, Migrations, and Flask Migrate extension. Then we will move onto adding migrations using Flask-Migrate. Let’s get started and understand it step by step.

What are Database Models?

A Database model defines the logical design and structure of a database which includes the relationships and constraints that determine how data can be stored and accessed. Presently, we are having a User and file Models in the project.

What are Migrations?

Database migration is a process, which usually includes assessment, database schema conversion. Migrations enable us to manipulate modifications we make to the models and propagate these adjustments in the database. For example, if later on, we make a change to a field in one of the models, all we will want to do is create and do a migration, and the database will replicate the change.

What is Flask Migrate?

Flask-Migrate is an extension that handles SQLAlchemy database migrations for Flask applications using Alembic. The database operations are made available through the Flask command-line interface or through the Flask-Script extension.

Now let’s add support for migration in Badgeyay.

Step 1 :

pip install flask-migrate

 

Step 2 :

We will need to edit run.py and it will look like this :

import os
from flask import Flask
from flask_migrate import Migrate  // Imported Flask Migrate

from api.db import db
from api.config import config

......

db.init_app(app)
migrate = Migrate(app, db) // It will allow us to run migrations
......

@app.before_first_request
def create_tables():
    db.create_all()

if __name__ == '__main__':
    app.run()

 

Step 3 :

Creation of Migration Directory.

 export FLASK_APP=run.py
 flask db init

 

This will create Migration Directory in the backend API folder.

└── migrations
    ├── README
    ├── alembic.ini
    ├── env.py
    ├── script.py.mako
    └── versions

 

Step 4 :

We will do our first Migration by the following command.

flask db migrate

 

Step 5 :

We will apply the migrations by the following command.

flask db upgrade

 

Now we are all done with setting up Migrations to Flask SQLAlchemy for handling database changes in the badgeyay repository. We can verify the Migration by checking the database tables in the Database.

This is how I have added Migrations to Flask SQLAlchemy for handling Database changes using the Flask-Migrate extension in my Pull Request.

Resources:

  • PostgreSQL Docs    – Link
  • Flask Migrate Docs  – Link
  • SQLAlchemy Docs  – Link
  • Flask SQLAlchemy Docs – Link

Database Listener for User Centric Events

Badgeyay is an open-source utility developed by FOSSASIA to generate badges for conferences and events. The project is separated into two components to ease maintainability. First is the frontend part which is in ember and second part is backend which is in Flask. The choice of database to support backend is PostgreSQL.

Now comes the problem, whenever a user is registered in the database, he should receive  a verification mail, that he is successfully registered on the platform. For this case we have to listen to the database events on User model. This issue has greater extendibility than only sending greeting or verification mail to the user. We can extend this to trigger services that are dependent on user registration, like subscribing the user to some set of services based on the plan he opted while registration and many more.

These type of issues cannot be handled by normal relationship with tables and other entities, there has to be logic in place to support such functionalities. So the challenges for tackling the problem are as follows:

  • Listen to the insert_action in User model
  • Extracting the details necessary for the logic
  • Execute particular logic

Procedure

  1. Attaching insert_action listener to the User model. This function will get triggered whenever an entity is saved in the User model.

<!– HTML generated using hilite.me –>

@db.event.listens_for(User, "after_insert")
def logic(mapper, connection, target): {
......
}
  1. When the function gets triggered, extract the details of the saved user that is necessary for the logic. As currently we are sending greeting mail to the user,we only need the email of the user. Target is the actual saved user passed as argument to the listening function from the library.

<!– HTML generated using hilite.me –>

msg = {}
msg['subject'] = "Welcome to Badgeyay"
msg['receipent'] = target.email
msg['body'] = "It's good to have you onboard with Badgeyay. Welcome to " \
"FOSSASIA Family."
sendMail(msg)
  1. Now the details are passed to sendMail() function for sending mail which uses flask-mail library to send mail to the recipient.
    def sendMail(message):
    if message and message.receipent:
    try:
    msg = Message(
    subject=message.subject,
    sender=app.config['MAIL_USERNAME'], Response(200).generateMessage(
    recipients=[message.receipent],
    body=message.body)
    Mail(app).send(msg)
    except Exception as e:
    return jsonify(
    Response(500).exceptWithMessage(
    str(e),
    'Unable to send the mail'))
    return jsonify(
    Response(200).generateMessage(
    'Mail Sent'))
    else:
    return jsonify(
    Response(403).generateMessage(
    'No data received')) 'No data received'))
    
  2. This will send mail to the user who has been registered to the application.

Similarly we can use separate logics according to the need of the application.

 

The Pull Request for the above functionality is at this Link

Topics Involved

Working on the issue involve following topics:

  • Configuring mail service to allow insecure apps access.
  • Sending mail from the flask-mail to end user
  • Attaching listener to listen for database change
  • Extraction of data from saved object in database sqlalchemy.

Resources

  • Sending Mails Programmatically –  Link
  • Flask Mail Documentation – Link
  • Listening to database events – Link
  • Enabling access to GMAIL to send mails to recipient – Link

Adding multiple email support for users on Open Event Server

The Open Event Server enables organizers to manage events from concerts to conferences and meet-ups. It offers features for events with several tracks and venues. Event managers can create invitation forms for speakers and build schedules in a drag and drop interface. The event information is stored in a database. The system provides API endpoints to fetch the data, and to modify and update it.

The Open Event Server is based on JSON 1.0 Specification and hence build on top of Flask Rest Json API (for building Rest APIs) and Marshmallow (for Schema).

In this blog, we will talk about how to add support of multiple emails for a user in Open Event Server. The focus is on model and schema creation for this support.

Model Creation

For the UserEmail, we’ll make our model as follows

from app.models import db

class UserEmail(db.Model):
“””user email model class”””
__tablename__ = ‘user_emails’
id = db.Column(db.Integer, primary_key=True)
email = db.Column(db.String(120), unique=True, nullable=False)
verified = db.Column(db.Boolean, default=False)
user_id = db.Column(db.Integer, db.ForeignKey(‘users.id’, ondelete=’CASCADE’))
user = db.relationship(“User”, backref=”emails”, foreign_keys=[user_id])

def __init__(self, email=None, user_id=None):
self.email = email
self.user_id = user_id

def __str__(self):
return ‘User:’ + unicode(self.user_id).encode(‘utf-8’) + ‘ email: ‘ + unicode(self.email).encode(‘utf-8’)

def __unicode__(self):
return unicode(self.id)

Now, let’s try to understand the attributes of this model.

  1. id is most important Column required in every model to set it as primary key and to uniquely identify an UserEmail object.
  2. email is that attribute which is required hence should be unique and non-nullable.
  3. Verified attribute is used to check whether a email is verified or not (thus should be boolean)
  4. User_id is the attribute which specifies id of the user whose email is contained in the UserEmail object.
  5. Finally, a relationship with the user of id user_id and these emails (associated with the User.id == user_id) will be stored in the attribute emails in User Model.

Schema Creation

For the model UserEmail, we’ll make our schema UserEmailSchema as follows

from marshmallow_jsonapi import fields
from marshmallow_jsonapi.flask import Schema, Relationshipfrom app.api.helpers.utilities import dasherizeclass UserEmailSchema(Schema):
“””   API Schema for user email Model   “””class Meta:
“””  Meta class for user email API schema  “””
type_ = ‘user-emails’
self_view = ‘v1.user_emails_detail’
self_view_kwargs = {‘id’: ‘<id>’}
inflect = dasherize

id = fields.Str(dump_only=True)
email = fields.Email(allow_none=False)
user_id = fields.Integer(allow_none=False)
user = Relationship(attribute=’user’,
self_view=’v1.user_email’,
self_view_kwargs={‘id’: ‘<id>’},
related_view=’v1.user_detail’,
related_view_kwargs={‘user_id’: ‘<id>’},
schema=’UserSchema’,
type_=’user’
)

  • Marshmallow-jsonapi provides a simple way to produce JSON API-compliant data in any Python web framework.

Now, let’s try to understand the schema UserEmailSchema

  1. id : Same as in model id is used as uniquely identify an UserEmail object.
  2. email : Same as in model email is required thus allow_none is set to False.
  3. User_id : user_id is the id of user whose email is contained in a UserEmailSchema object.
  4. User : It tells whole attributes of the user to which this email belongs to.

So, we saw how to add multiple email support for users on Open Event Server. We just required to create a model and its schema to add this feature. Similarly, to add support for any database model in the project, we need to create Model and Schema with all the attributes as specified in the model too. This Schema creation is done with guidelines of JSONAPI 1.0 Specification using Marshmallow.

Resources

Variable Font Size Badgeyay

Badgeyay is a simple badge generator that aims for promoting an open-source tool for generation of badges in PDF format. The project has options to choose from predefined set of images or upload a background image. User can choose from set of fonts and color of the same. But now Badgeyay also has option to choose custom font-size in generation of badges.

To implement font size feature,  first, the component that is determining the font of the label has to be identified. The label that determines the text on the badge is the <text> label and within it, the label that determines the properties of the text is <tspan>. So mainly we need to alter the properties in the tspan.

The property that determines the font size for the badge is font-size and its default value is set to 31.25 px. If the property in the labels changed, then we can see the corresponding changes in the PDF generated from the svg.

Now the challenges were:

  • To Determine the font value from the frontend.
  • Using the same for the font-config.
  • Changing the built svg accordingly.

Procedure

  1. Firstly frontend component has to be changed to incorporate a slider to give input for the variable font size. So a range input is inserted with range from 15 px to 45 px and default as 30 px. The size_print label gets changed dynamically to show the value selected from the range slider.
<li>
<input type="radio" name="fontsize" id="font-size-picker"> Choose font size
</li>
<section id="font-size-input" style="display:none;">
<label for="inputFile" id="size_print"></label>
<div>
<input type="range" id="font-size" max=45 min=15 step=5 value=30  class="form-control" name="font_size">
</div>
</section>
  1. After adding the component, form script is changed to add toggle behaviour to the button. For adding the toggling behaviour in the component, checkbox is used and the value of the label is updated dynamically as the slider value is changed.
$("#size_print").text($("#font-size").val() + " px");

      $("#font-size-picker").click(function () {

          if ($(this).is(":checked")) {

              $("#font-size-input").css("display", "block");

          } else {

              $("#font-size-input").css("display", "none");

          }

      });

      $("#font-size").on('input', function () {

          $("#size_print").text($(this).val() + " px");

      });
  1. After completing the work on the frontend, it is necessary to modify the backend too. The method for choosing custom font has to be refactored. It now checks whether the custom font is set or font size variable is set, and creates a config file for fonts which after use gets deleted.
font_config = {}
   # custom font is specified
   if custom_font != '':
       font_config['font'] = custom_font
   if font_size != '':
       font_config['font_size'] = font_size
   if custom_font != '' or font_size != '':
       json_str = json.dumps(font_config)
       print(json_str)
       f = open(os.path.join(app.config['UPLOAD_FOLDER'], 'fonts.json'), "w+")
       f.write(json_str)
       f.close()
  1. The generator class is modified as well to accommodate the changes, by adding a new class attribute called font_size. We find the keys in the dict object loaded from the file and assign the same to class attribute.
if 'font_size' in self.DATA.keys():
               self.font_size = self.DATA['font_size']
  1. Make the necessary change in the svg, so that font size change can be represented in the generated PDF. Replace the old font size with the new font size specified.
if self.font_size:
           content = content.replace("font-size:31.25px",
                                     "font-size:" + str(self.font_size) + "px")
  1. After all the changes, badge generated will have a different font size.

The Pull request for the above change is at this Link

Topics Involved

Working on this Issue (Link) involve following topics:

  • SVG Label manipulation
  • Sending data from Ember frontend to Backend.
  • Javascript for the toggle radio button.

References

  • Extracting map information from the SVG (Link)
  • Python Documentation for class (Link)
  • About Github Pages- (Link)
  • Ajax Serialize method to serialize the form contents – (Link)

Refactoring and Remodeling Badgeyay API

When we build a full scale production application, we make sure that everything is modeled correctly and accordingly to the need of the code. The code must be properly maintained as well as designed in such a way that it is less prone to errors and bugs.

Badgeyay is also targeting to be a full production application, and in order to achieve it we first need to re-factor the code and model it using a strong yet maintainable structure.

What is the current state of Badgeyay?

Currently Badgeyay is divided into two sub folders.

\badgeyay
    \frontend
    \backend
    .
    .

It is backed by two folders, viz backend and frontend. The ‘backend’ folder handles the API that the service is currently running. The ‘frontend’ folder houses the Ember based frontend logic of the application.

Improvements to Badgeyay Backend

We have worked on improving Backend for Badgeyay. Instead of traditional methods, i.e. current method, of API development; We employ a far better approach of using Flask Blueprint as a method of refactoring the API.

The new backend API resides inside the following structure.

\badgeyay
    \backend
        \blueprint
            \api

The API folder currently holds the new API being formatted from scratch using

  • Flask Blueprint
  • Flask Utilities like jsonify, response etc

The new structure of Badgeyay Backend will follow the following structure

api
    \config
    \controllers
    \helpers
    \models
    \utils
    db.py
    run.py

The folders and their use cases are given below

  • \config
    • Contain all the configuration files
    • Configurations about URLs, PostgreSQL etc
  • \controllers
    • This will contain the controllers for our API
    • Controllers will be the house to our routes for APIs
  • \helpers
    • Helpers folder will contain the files directly related to API
  • \models
    • Models folder contains the Schemas for PostgreSQL
    • Classes like User etc will be stored in here
  • \utils
    • Utils will contain the helper functions or classes
    • This classes or functions are not directly connected to the APIs
  • db.py
    • Main python file for Flask SQLAlchemy
  • run.py
    • This is the main entry point.
    • Running this file will run the entire Flask Blueprint API

How does it help?

  • It helps in making the backend more solid.
  • It helps in easy understanding of application with maintained workflow.
  • Since we will be adding a variety of features during Google Summer of Code 2018 therefore we need to have a well structured API with well defined paths for every file being used inside it.
  • It will help in easy maintaining for any maintainer on this project.
  • Development of the API will be faster in this way, since everything is divided into sub parts therefore many people can work on many different possibilities on the same time.

Further Improvements

Since this structure has been setup correctly in Badgeyay now, so we can work on adding separate routes and different functionalities can be added simultaneously.

It ensures faster development of the project.

Resources

Auto Deployment of Badgeyay Backend by Heroku Pipeline

Badgeyay project is now divided into two parts i.e front-end of Ember JS and back-end with REST-API programmed in Python. One of the challenging job is that, it should support the uncoupled architecture. Now, we have to integrate Heroku deployed API with Github which should auto deploy every Pull Request made to the Development Branch and help in easing the Pull Request review process.

In this blog, I’ll be discussing how I have configured Heroku Pipeline to auto deploy every Pull request made to the Development Branch and help in easing the Pull Request review process  in Badgeyay in my Pull Request.
First, Let’s understand Heroku Pipeline and its features. Then we will move onto configuring the Pipeline file to run auto deploy PR.. Let’s get started and understand it step by step.

What is Heroku Pipeline ?

A pipeline is a group of Heroku apps that share the same codebase. Each app in a pipeline represents one of the following steps in a continuous delivery workflow:

  • Review
  • Development
  • Staging
  • Production

A common Heroku continuous delivery workflow has the following steps:

  • A developer creates a pull request to make a change to the codebase.
  • Heroku automatically creates a review app for the pull request, allowing    developers to test the change.
  • When the change is ready, it’s merged into the codebase Default branch.
  • The Default branch is automatically deployed to staging for further testing.
  • When it’s ready, the staging app is promoted to production, where the change is available to end users of the app.

In badgeyay, I have used Review App and Development App steps for auto deployment of Pull Request.

Pre – requisites:

  • You should have admin rights of the Github Repository.
  • You should be the owner of the Heroku deployed app.
  • For creating a Review App , Below mentioned files are needed to be in the root of the project repository to trigger the Heroku Build.

1. App.json

{
    "name": "BadgeYay-API",
    "description": "A fully functional REST API for badges generator using flask",
    "repository": "https://github.com/fossasia/badgeyay/backend/",
    "keywords": [
        "badgeyay",
        "fossasia",
        "flask"
    ],
    "buildpacks": [
        {
            "url": "heroku/python"
        }
    ]
}
2. Procfile

web: gunicorn --pythonpath backend/app/ main:app

 

Now, I have fulfilled all the prerequisites needed for integrating Github repository to Heroku Deployed Badgeyay API. Let’s move to Heroku Dashboard of the Badgeyay API and implement auto deployment of every Pull Request.

Step 1 :

Open the heroku Deployed App on the dashboard. Yow will see following tabs in top of the dashboard.

Step 2 :

Click on Deploy and first create a new pipeline by giving a name to it and choose a stage for the pipeline.

Step 3 :

  • Choose a Deployment Method. For the badgeyay project, I have  integrated Github for auto deployment of PR.
  • Select the repository and connect with it.
  • You will receive a pop-up which will ensure that repository is connected to Heroku.

Step 4 :
Enable automatic deploys for the Github repository.

Step 5 :

Now after adding the pipeline, present app get nested under the pipeline. Click on the pipeline name on the top and now we have a pipeline dashboard like this :

Step 6:

Now for auto deployment of PR, enable Review Apps by filling the required information like this :

Step 7:

Verify by creating a test PR after following every above mentioned steps.

 

Now we are all done with setting up auto deployment of every pull request to badgeyay repository.

This is how I have configured Heroku Pipeline to auto deploy every Pull request made to the Development Branch and help in easing the Pull Request review process.

About Author :

I have been contributing in open source organization FOSSASIA, where I’m working on a project called BadgeYaY. It is a badge generator with a simple web UI to add data and generate printable badges in PDF.

Resources:

  • Heroku Pipelines Article – Link

FOSSASIA Internship Program 2018

Are you interested to participate in the development of Open Source projects in a summer internship? Build up your developer profile with FOSSASIA and spend your summer coding on an open source project.  Contribute to SUSI.AIOpen EventBadgeyayYaydoc, Meilix or PSLab and join us at a workshop week and Jugaadfest in India. Please find the details below and submit your application to our form. Be sure to check out FOSSASIA’s program guidelines.

1. Program Details

  • Sign up on our dedicated form at fossasia.org/internship (Interns need to become members of the org and sign up on its social channels)
  • Internships are 3 months with monthly evaluations
  • plus preparation onboarding after acceptance
  • Eligible are contributors above 18 years of age. Any contributor is eligible including students, professionals, university staff etc. Prefered are contributors who have participated in the community previously.
  • Benefits of the program include Shirts, Swag, certificates. All participants who pass the final evaluation will be eligible to participate in a workshop week and Jugaadfest in September 2018 in Hyderabad. Travel grants and accommodation will be provided.
  • The program is intended as a full-time program. However, if contributors would like to participate who have a day job, they can still join and pass the program if they fulfill all program requirements. All contributors who pass the program will be able to receive funding for workshops and Jugaadfest participation.

2. Timeline

  • Application period ongoing until May 12
  • Acceptance ongoing until May 12
  • Start of pre-period:  May
  • Start of Internship: 1st June
  • Evaluation 1: July
  • Evaluation 2: August
  • Evaluation 3: September
  • End of Internship:  September, 2018
  • Issuing of Certificates: September 2018
  • FOSSASIA Workshop Week /Jugaadfest: September/October

3. Deliverables

  • Daily scrum email to project mailing list answering three questions: What did I do yesterday? What is my plan for today? Is there anything preventing me from achieving my goals, e.g. blockers?
  • Work according to pull requests and issues (submit code on Github and match it with issues)
  • Daily code submissions (software, hardware)
  • Documentation: Text, YouTube videos
  • 1 technical blog post a month with details on solving a problem in a FOSSASIA project (Monthly – 1: by Monday of second week)
  • Design items (in open formats, e.g. XCF, SVG, EPS)

4. Participating Projects

5. Best Practices

Please follow best practices as defined here: https://blog.fossasia.org/open-source-developer-guide-and-best-practices-at-fossasia/

6. Participant Benefits/Support

Participants will receive Swag, certificates and travel support to the FOSSASIA Workshop week and Jugaadfest.

  • Evaluation 1: July, 2018: Successful Participants receive a FOSSASIA Tshirt (sent out together with bag in evaluation 2)
  • Evaluation 2: August: Successful Participants receive a beautiful FOSSASIA bag
  • Evaluation 3: September: Successful Participants receive the following support to participate in the FOSSASIA India Workshop Week and Jugaadfest:
    • 100 SGD travel support from within India and 200 SGD support if coming from outside India
    • One week accommodation in Hyderabad (organized by FOSSASIA)
    • Catering during workshops

Daimler: Our developers know about the advantages of Open Source Software

Vlado Koljibabic is Head of CASE IT at Daimler AG, the parent company of the car manufacturer Mercedes-Benz. He aims to strengthen the idea of Open Source in his company. Daimler is a partner of FOSSASIA. Torben Stephan interviewed Koljibabic on the advantages of open source software.

Stephan: What does CASE stand for?

Koljibabic: CASE is the combination of everything disruptive regarding our business: Connected, Autonomous, Shared & Services and Electric. These topics shall help us to transform from a car manufacturer to a mobility services provider. This is key in order to remain successful in the future.

How much Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) is actually part of a Mercedes?

We have been using FOSS for many years. Any Mercedes-Benz comes with a CD full of FOSS licenses. Every license belongs to a piece of open source software which is implemented in our cars. Even our Mercedes me app contains seven OS licenses. We use it because our developers know about the advantages of OSS.

Which are?

We don’t need to develop everything from scratch, we can reuse things where it makes sense and contribute to the development of open standards that increase efficiency throughout the system.

Daimler is a member of the “Automotive Grade Linux” (AGL) initiative initiated by the Linux Foundation. Isn’t that the right place for such open standards?

Absolutely. During FOSSASIA, with the community, we discussed the opportunity of defining an open standard for electric vehicle charging stations. From my point of view it definitely does make sense to develop this via the AGL. On the other hand Daimler might put even more commitment into this project to show we seriously want to be part of this.

Vlado Koljibabic CASE IT Daimler
Vlado Koljibabic CASE IT Daimler

What’s the advantage of open source software compared to proprietary?

Two things: Nobel Prize laureate John Nash showed that sharing of commodities brings advantages to all players in the market. For me this is the secret of the success of open source software. Beside this we can use existing software solutions for recurring processes. And the car industry is full of recurring processes. If there is no ready-to-use solution, we can initiate and design the processes and contribute to the community.

How do other business units within Daimler respond to this ideas?

For a company like Daimler these are huge changes. That’s why we do this step-by-step. First of all we convince our internal stakeholders of the reasonableness and the value of FOSS. As a following step we accelerate the topic within concrete projects. The overall process of enhancement of OSS usage is initiated and strategically supported. Jan Brecht the CIO of the Daimler AG drives and promotes the initiative essentially.

In which fields would you refrain from publishing your source code?

For example in highly sensitive areas in terms of competition. One example is Autonomous Driving – I would not be the first to focus on open source when it comes to this topic right now. But I’m sure that within the next years, there will be a deck of open source tools for Autonomous Driving, Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence everyone can use.

Daimler uses a lot of open source. But what are you giving back to the community?

We are a member of the Linux Foundation and partner here at FOSSASIA. However, we don’t contribute source code yet in the context of open source projects. But we see the demand of the community and are working on it continuously to contribute as soon as possible.