Chrome Custom Tabs Integration – SUSI.AI Android App

Earlier, we have seen the apps having external links that opens and navigates the user to the phone browser when clicked, then we came up with something called WebView for Android, but nowadays we have shifted to something called In-App browsers. The main drawback of the system/ phone browsers are they caused heavy transition. To overcome this drawback “Chrome Custom Tabs” were invented which allowed users to walk through the web content seamlessly.

SUSI.AI Android App earlier used the system browser to open any link present in the app.

This can be implemented easily by

Intent browserIntent = new Intent(Intent.ACTION_VIEW, Uri.parse(url));
startActivity(browserIntent);

This lead to a huge transition between the context of the app and the web browser.

Then, to reduce all the clutter Chrome Custom tabs by Google was evolved which drastically increased the loading speed and the heavy context switch was also not taking place due to the integration and adaptability of custom tabs within the app.

Chrome custom tabs also are very secured like Chrome Browser and uses the same feature and give developers a more control on the custom actions, user interface within the app.

                                comparing the load time of the above mentioned techniques

Ref : Android Dev – Chrome Custom Tabs

Integration of Chrome Custom Tabs

  • Adding the dependency in build.gradle(app-level) in the project
dependencies {
    //Other dependencies 
    compile 'com.android.support:customtabs:23.4.0'
}
  • Now instantiating a CustomTabsIntent Builder

    String url = “https://www.fossasia.org” // can be any link
    
    CustomTabsIntent.Builder builder = new CustomTabsIntent.Builder(); //custom tabs intent builder
    
    CustomTabsIntent customTabsIntent = builder.build();
  • We can also add animation or customize the color of the toolbar or add action buttons.

    builder.setColor(Color.RED) //for setting the color of the toolbar 
    builder.setStartAnimations(this, R.anim.slide_in_right, R.anim.slide_out_left); //for start animation
    builder.setExitAnimations(this, R.anim.slide_in_left, R.anim.slide_out_right); //for exit animation
  • Finally, we have have achieved everything with a little code. Final launch the web page

    Uri webpage = Uri.parse(url); //We have to pass an URI
    
    customTabsIntent.launchUrl(context, webpage); //launching through custom tabs

Benefits of Chrome Custom Tabs

  1. UI Customization are easily available and can be implemented with very few lines of code. 
  2. Faster page loading and in-app access of the external link 
  3. Animations for start/exit  
  4. Has security and uses the same permission model as in chrome browser.

Resources

  1. Chrome Custom Tabs:  https://developer.chrome.com/multidevice/android/customtabs
  2. Chrome Custom Tabs Github Repo: GitHub – GoogleChrome/custom-tabs-client: Chrome custom tabs
  3. Android Blog: Android Developers Blog: Chrome custom tabs smooth the transition
  4. Video: Chrome Custom Tabs: Displaying 3rd party content in your Android

 

Building PSLab Android app with Fdroid

Fdroid is a place for open source enthusiasts and developers to host their Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) for free and get more people onboard into their community. Hosting an app in Fdroid is not a fairly easy process just like hosting one in Google Play. We need to perform a set of build checks prior to making a merge request (which is similar to pull request in GitHub) in the fdroid-data GitLab repository. PSLab Android app by FOSSASIA has undergone through all these checks and tests and now ready to be published.

Setting up the fdroid-server and fdroid-data repositories is one thing. Building our app using the tools provided by fdroid is another thing. It will involve quite a few steps to get started. Fdroid requires all the apps need to be built using:

$ fdroid build -v -l org.fossasia.pslab

 

This will output a set of logs which tell us what went wrong in the builds. The usual one in a first time app is obviously the build is not taking place at all. The reason is our metadata file needs to be changed to initiate a build.

Build:<versioncode>,<versionname>
    commit=<commit which has the build mentioned in versioncode>
    subdir=app
    gradle=yes

 

When a metadata file is initially created, this build is disabled by default and commit is set to “?”. We need to fill in those blanks. Once completed, it will look like the snippet above. There can be many blocks of “Build” can be added to the end of metadata file as we are advancing and upgrading through the app. As an example, the latest PSLab Android app has the following metadata “Build” block:

Build:1.1.5,7
    commit=0a50834ccf9264615d275a26feaf555db42eb4eb
    subdir=app
    gradle=yes

 

In case of an update, add another “Build” block and mention the version you want to appear on the Fdroid repository as follows:

Auto Update Mode:Version v%v
Update Check Mode:Tags
Current Version:1.1.5
Current Version Code:7

 

Once it is all filled, run the build command once again. If you have properly set the environment in your local PC, build will end successfully assuming there were no Java or any other language syntax errors.

It is worth to mention few other facts which are common to Android software projects. Usually the source code is packed in a folder named “app” inside the repository and this is the common scenario if Android Studio builds up the project from scratch. If this “app” folder is one level below the root, that is “android/app”, the build instructions shown above will throw an error as it cannot find the project files.

The reason behind this is we have mentioned “subdir=app” in the metadata file. Change this to “subdir=android/app” and run the build again. The idea is to direct the build to find where the project files are.

Apart from that, the commit can be represented by a tag instead of a long commit hash. As an example, if we had merge commits in PSLab labeled as “v.<versioncode>”, we can simply use “commit=v.1.1.5” instead of the hash code. It is just a matter of readability.

Happy Coding!

Reference:

  1. Metadata : https://f-droid.org/docs/Build_Metadata_Reference/#Build
  2. PSLab Android app Fdroid : https://gitlab.com/fdroid/fdroiddata/merge_requests/3271/diffs

Using file.io for Meilix Deployment

Meilix is developed in FOSSASIA and is deployed as a release on Github, but the download speed on GitHub for large files is slow. Alternatively deployment can be done on 3rd party servers. transfer.sh offers a good service for a start, but they only have a reduced storage for heavy usage such as what is required for Meilix. file.io is a good alternative. file.io has API features which can be used in .travis.yml to deploy meilix. For the time being, we are deploying a generator branch to file.io

Changes made in the .travis.yml

We need to edit the .travis.yml to deploy the artifact on file.io

deploy:
provider: script
script: curl -F "[email protected]/home/travis/$(image_name)" https://file.io
on:
branch: generator

We need to edit the deploy attribute in the travis to get the deployment done in file.io. Query contains the address of the file which needs to be uploaded on file.io. Then the branch name is provided on which deployment needs to be done.

Output:

Travis executes the command to deploy the application.

{"success":true,"key":"5QBEry","link":"https://file.io/5QBEry","expiry":"14 days"}

success: true  the artifact is successfully deployed.

key and link: gives the link from where the ISO can be downloaded.

expiry: tell the number of days after which the ISO will be deleted and by default it is set to 14 days.

We can manually input expiry parameter to declare the expiry time.

script: curl -F "[email protected]/home/travis/$(image_name)" https://file.io/?expires=1w

This will set the expiry time to seven days. If you set it with w, it will be number of weeks, m will be for number of months, y will be number of years.

file.io solved the most important issue of meilix deployment and this approach can be use several different project of FOSSASIA for the deployment purpose.

References:

Adding Push endpoint to send data from Loklak Search to Loklak Server

To provide enriched and sufficient amount of data to Loklak, Loklak Server should have multiple sources of data. The api/push.json endpoint of loklak server is used in Loklak to post the search result object to server. It will increase the amount and quality of data on server once the Twitter api is supported by Loklak (Work is in progress to add support for twitter api in loklak).

Creating Push Service

The idea is to create a separate service for making a Post request to server. First step would be to create a new ‘PushService’ under ‘services/’ using:

ng g service services/push

Creating model for Push Api Response

Before starting to write code for push service, create a new model for the type of response data obtained from Post request to ‘api/push.json’. For this, create a new file push.ts under ‘models/’ with the code given below and export the respective push interface method in index file.

export interface PushApiResponse {
   status: string;
   records: number;
   mps: number;
   message: string;
}

Writing Post request in Push Service

Next step would be to create a Post request to api/push.json using HttpClient module. Import necessary dependencies and create an object of HttpClient module in constructor and write a PostData() method which would take the data to be send, makes a Post request and returns the Observable of PushApiResponse created above.

import { Injectable } from ‘@angular/core’;
import {
   HttpClient,
   HttpHeaders,
   HttpParams
} from ‘@angular/common/http’;
import { Observable } from ‘rxjs’;
import {
	ApiResponse,
	PushApiResponse
} from ‘../models’;

@Injectable({
   providedIn: ‘root’
})
export class PushService {

   constructor( private http: HttpClient ) { }
   public postData(data: ApiResponse):
   		Observable<PushApiResponse> {

	const httpUrl = ‘https://api.loklak.org/
		api/push.json’;
	const headers = new HttpHeaders({
		‘Content-Type’: ‘application/
			x-www-form-urlencoded’,
		‘Accept’: ‘application/json’,
		‘cache-control’: ‘no-cache’
	});
	const {search_metadata, statuses} = data;
	
	// Converting the object to JSON string.
	const dataToSend = JSON.stringify({
		search_metadata: search_metadata,
		statuses});
	
	// Setting the data to send in
	// HttpParams() with key as ‘data’
	const body = new HttpParams()
		.set(‘data’, dataToSend);
	
	// Making a Post request to api/push.json
	// endpoint. Response Object is converted
	// to PushApiResponse type.
	return this.http.post<PushApiResponse>(
		httpUrl, body, {headers:
		headers
	});
   }
}

 

Note: Data (dataToSend) send to backend should be exactly in same format as obtained from server.

Pushing data into service dynamically

Now the main part is to provide the data to be send into the service. To make it dynamic, import the Push Service in ‘api-search.effects.ts’ file under effects and create the object of Push Service in its constructor.

import { PushService } from ‘../services’;
constructor(
   
   private pushService: PushService
) { }

 

Now, call the pushService object inside ‘relocateAfterSearchSuccess$’ effect method and pass the search response data (payload value of search success action) inside Push Service’s postData() method.

@Effect()
relocateAfterSearchSuccess$: Observable<Action>
   = this.actions$
       .pipe(
           ofType(
               apiAction.ActionTypes
			   	.SEARCH_COMPLETE_SUCCESS,
               apiAction.ActionTypes
			   	.SEARCH_COMPLETE_FAIL
           ),
           withLatestFrom(this.store$),
           map(([action, state]) => {
               this.pushService
			   .postData(action[‘payload’]);
           
       );

Testing Successful Push to Backend

To test the success of Post request, subscribe to the response data and print the response data on console. You should see something like:

Where each of these is a response of one successful Post request.

Resources

Adding typing animation and messages in SUSI Web bot plugin

SUSI web plugin bot provides the features of SUSI as a chat window which users can plugin to their websites. They just need to copy the generated javascript code into their website and the SUSI bot plugin will be enabled. This blog explains about the process of creating messages from both the user side and the bot side, and adding typing animation in the SUSI web chat plugin. A live demo of the bot can be found at susi-chatbotplugin-demo.surge.sh.

Creating User’s message

The main javascript file of our concern is skills.susi.ai/public/susi-chatbot.js. When the user types their message and press enter, setUserResponse() function is executed:

This function adds a message box to the chat window. The message box contains the message of the user.
Result:

Adding typing animation

After the user types the message and the message box is displayed, setUserResponse() function is executed. This function sets up a message box from the bot’s side and fills it with a loading gif. The important thing to note is msgNumber variable. For each user message, this variable is incremented by one. So it keeps count of the total number of message from the user or the bot. Each message box from the bot is assigned a unique id: “susiMsg-<msgNumber>”. Thus, when the response from the SUSI server is received, the loading gif is replaced by the message from the server. The corresponding message box is identified by the above id.

This function adds a message box to the chat window containing the loading gif.
Result:

On receiving the response from the server, the following function is executed:

function setBotResponse(val,msgNumber) {
    val = val.replace(new RegExp('\r?\n','g'), '<br />');
    $("#susiMsg-"+msgNumber+" .susi-msg-content-div").text(val);
    scrollToBottomOfResults();
}

 

This function replaces the above loading gif with the server’s response.

Final result:

Resources

Deploying SUSI Zulip bot

Zulip is a popular Real time messaging system, which combines the immediacy of Slack with an email threading model. The SUSI Zulipbot is a custom chatbot for zulip platform which fetches the response from the SUSI Server and will have some additional zulip platform specific features too. Users can install the bot into their zulip workspaces and then interact with the bot. They can either talk to the bot in private message or talk in group channels. This blog walks through the process of deploying SUSI Zulip bot into your workspace.

Cloning python-zulip-api

Python-zulip-api is where all the bots being developed for the Zulip platform can be found. The SUSI bot can be found in zulip_bots/bots/susi. susi.py is the main file where the bot’s code resides. test_susi.py is the file where the test cases for the bot are written. To clone and run the bot locally, make sure you have python3, pip and virtualenv installed. Then follow the below steps:

  1. git clone https://github.com/zulip/python-zulip-api.git  – clone the python-zulip-api repository.
  2. cd python-zulip-api  – navigate into your cloned repository.
  3. python3 ./tools/provision  – install all requirements in a Python virtualenv.
  4. The output of provision  will end with a command of the form source …/activate; run that command to enter the new virtualenv.
  5. Finished. You should now see the name of your venv preceding your prompt, e.g. (zulip-api-py3-venv)

For more information about installing the repository, refer https://zulipchat.com/api/writing-bots

Testing the bot’s output locally

For quick testing of your bot’s output, zulip-terminal is a very useful tool. It provides you a testing environment inside your terminal. After installing the above requirements, run  zulip-terminal susi in your terminal to enable testing the bot’s output:

Enter your message: hi
Reply from the bot is printed between the dotted lines:
——-
Hello!
——-
Enter your message: tell me a joke
Reply from the bot is printed between the dotted lines:
——-
It is said that looking into Chuck Norris’ eyes will reveal your future. Unfortunately, everybody’s future is always the same: death by a roundhouse-kick to the face.
——-
Enter your message: who created you?
Reply from the bot is printed between the dotted lines:
——-
The FOSSASIA community created me
——-
Enter your message: ^C
Ok, if you’re happy with your terminal-based testing, try it out with a Zulip server.
You can refer to https://zulipchat.com/api/running-bots#running-a-bot.

Deploying the bot in a Zulip workspace

Now you can deploy the bot in your own workspace or even in chat.zulip.org workspace. Follow these steps:

  1. After logging to your workspace, go to Settings () -> Your bots -> Add a new bot. Select Generic bot for bot type, fill out the form and click on Create bot.
  2. A new bot user should appear in the Active bots panel.
  3. Download the bot’s zuliprc configuration file to your computer.
  4. Run  zulip-run-bot susi –config-file ~/zuliprc-my-bot (using the path to the zuliprc file from above step).
  5. Congrats! Your bot should be running. Talk to your bot with mentioning @susi in a group channel or directly in a private channel.

Resources

Adding Event Roles concerning a User on Open Event Server

The Open Event Server enables organizers to manage events from concerts to conferences and meetups. It offers features for events with several tracks and venues. Event managers can create invitation forms for speakers and build schedules in a drag and drop interface. The event information is stored in a database. The system provides API endpoints to fetch the data, and to modify and update it. The Open Event Server is based on JSON 1.0 Specification and hence build on top of Flask Rest Json API (for building Rest APIs) and Marshmallow (for Schema).

In this blog, we will talk about how to add different events role concerning a user on Open Event Server. The focus is on its model and Schema updation.

Model Updation

For the User Table, we’ll update our User Model as follows:

Now, let’s try to understand these hybrid properties.

In this feature, we are providing Admin the rights to see whether a user is acting as a organizer, co-organizer, track_organizer, moderator, attendee and registrar of any of the event or not. Here, _is_role method is used to check whether an user plays a event role like organizer, co-organizer, track_organizer, moderator, attendee and registrar or not. This is done by querying the record from UserEventsRole model. If the record is present then the returned value is True otherwise False.

Schema Updation

For the User Model, we’ll update our Schema as follows

Now, let’s try to understand this Schema.

Since all the properties will return either True or false so these all properties are set to Boolean in Schema. Here dump_only means, we will return this property in the Schema.

So, we saw how User Model and Schema is updated to show events role concerning a user on Open Event Server.

Resources

Creating Device Screen to show connection status of PSLab Device

For using the PSLab Device the user needs to connect the PSLab device to an Android Phone having a PSLab android app. So there should be a screen that should be able to show the proper status of the PSLab device connection to the android app dynamically and it should also contain instructions on “How to connect the device to the app”.

So, in this blog we will create a device screen which shows the proper status of the connection of the PSLab device with the phone.

First step will be designing the layout for the device screen, for this we will create a fragment named HomeFragment and for its layout we will make use of the Relative Layout as view group and then create a Linearlayout inside it and position it at the center so that it always appears at the center in different screen sizes.

Then inside the LinearLayout, we will create(as shown in respective order) :

  1. ImageView and TextView for showing the status of device connection.
  2. Linear Layout with multiple TextView showing instructions on “How to connect the device to the screen”.
  3. A TextView that will direct the user to a webview showing PSLab website.

After creating all the above views we have created the layout will look like this: –

Now for showing the PSLab connection status dynamically, we have to implement following logic:

  1. When the device is connected it should show the connected icon and text and hide the instructions.
  2. When the device is disconnected it should show the disconnected icon and text and also the instructions.

For this, we will create a method inside the HomeFragment Java file which make use of Arguments deviceConnected and deviceFound to store device connected status.

public static HomeFragment newInstance(boolean deviceConnected, boolean deviceFound) {
HomeFragment homeFragment = new HomeFragment();
homeFragment.deviceConnected = deviceConnected;
homeFragment.deviceFound = deviceFound;
return homeFragment;
}

When both arguments are true we will show the connected text and icon and hide the instructions.

And when both arguments are false we will show the disconnected text and icon and display the instructions.

if (deviceFound && deviceConnected) {
   tvConnectMsg.setVisibility(View.GONE);
   tvVersion.setText(scienceLab.getVersion());
   tvVersion.setVisibility(View.VISIBLE);
   imgViewDeviceStatus.setImageResource(R.drawable.icons8_usb_connected_100);
   tvDeviceStatus.setText(getString(R.string.device_connected_successfully));
} else {
 imgViewDeviceStatus.setImageResource(R.drawable.icons_usb_disconnected_100);
 tvDeviceStatus.setText(getString(R.string.device_not_found));
}

How do we know that the device is connected?

For this, we have to handle the USB Attach event [1] that is whenever the USB is connected the Android will give a broadcast of USB connected and on receiving that broadcast in the app we will replace the HomeFragment giving setting both arguments to true. 

We will create a Broadcast Receiver[2] in the main activity which executes it’s onReceive() method on receiving USB attach event.

private final BroadcastReceiver mUsbReceiver = new BroadcastReceiver() {
   public void onReceive(Context context, Intent intent) {
     String action = intent.getAction();
     if (UsbManager.ACTION_USB_DEVICE_ATTACHED.equals(action)) {
       UsbDevice device =  intent.getParcelableExtra(UsbManager.EXTRA_DEVICE);
       if(device!=null){                                                  
         getSupportFragmentManager().beginTransaction().replace(R.id.frame,                                            
           HomeFragment.newInstance(true, true)).commitAllowingStateLoss();
         }           
      }
   }
};

Here In the OnReceive Method, we will replace our device screen fragment by passing parameters deviceConnected = true and deviceFound = true to HomeFragment newInstance() method.

Every time we create a Receiver we have to bind corresponding intent filters with broadcast receivers when the application is created.

IntentFilter filter = new IntentFilter(UsbManager.ACTION_USB_DEVICE_ATTACHED);
registerReceiver(mUsbReceiver, filter);

Similarly, we also have to handle the USB Detach event [2], here we will create a Broadcast Receiver[2] which executes in onReceive() method whenever the device is detached and here inside onReceive() method we will replace our device screen by passing parameters deviceConnected = false and deviceFound = false to newInstance() method in HomeFragment.

private final BroadcastReceiver mUsbReceiver = new BroadcastReceiver() {
   public void onReceive(Context context, Intent intent) {
     String action = intent.getAction();
     if (UsbManager.ACTION_USB_DEVICE_DETACHED.equals(action)) {                                           
getSupportFragmentManager().beginTransaction().replace(R.id.frame,                                            
           HomeFragment.newInstance(false, false)).commitAllowingStateLoss();
         }           
      }
   }
};

Thus, as shown in fig. 2 we have shown the PSLab device connection status dynamically on the screen by handling the USB attach/detach events.

Figure 2 shows the UI of ‘Device Screen’ for the two possible status: ‘not connected’ and ‘connected’

Resources

  1. Codepool Blog – “How to monitor USB events on Android?” by Xiao Ling
  2. Vogella article “What is Broadcast Receiver and how to insert it your app?”

Integrating Firebase Cloud Functions In Badgeyay

Badgeyay is an open source project developed by FOSSASIA Community for generating badges for conferences and events. The Project is divided into two parts frontend, which is in ember, and backend, which is in flask. Backend uses firebase admin SDK (Python) and Frontend uses firebase javascript client with emberfire wrapper for ember. Whenever an user signs up on the website, database listener that is attached to to the Model gets triggered and uses flask-mail for sending welcome mail to the user and in case of email and password signup, verification mail as well.

Problem is sending mail using libraries is a synchronous process and takes a lot of processing on the server. We can use messaging queues like RabbitMQ and Redis but that will be burden as server cost will increase. The workaround is to remove the code from the server and create a firebase cloud function for the same task.

Firebase cloud functions lets you run backend code on the cloud and can be triggered with HTTP events or listen for the events on the cloud, like user registration.

Procedure

  1. Firebase uses our Gmail ID for login, so make sure to have a Gmail ID and on the first sight we will be greeted with Firebase console, where we can see our created or imported firebase apps.

  1. Create the app by clicking on the Add Project Icon and write the name of the application (e.g. Test Application) and select the region, in my case it is India. Firebase will automatically generated an application ID for the app. Click on Create Project to complete creation of project

  2. After Completion, click on the project to enter into the project. You will be greeted with an overview saying to integrate firebase with your project. We will click on the Add Firebase to web App and save the config as JSON in a file as clientKey.json for later use.

  1. Now we need to install the firebase tools on our local machine so for that execute
npm i -g firebase-tools

 

  1. Now login from the CLI so that firebase gets token for the Gmail ID of the user and can access the firebase account of that Gmail ID.
firebase login

 

  1. After giving permissions to the firebase CLI from your Gmail account in the new tab opened in browser, create a folder named cloud_functions in the project directory and in that execute
firebase init

 

  1. Select only functions from the list of options by pressing space.

  2. After this select the project from the list where you want to use the cloud function. You can skip the step if you later want to add the cloud function to project by selecting don’t setup a default project and can later be used by command
firebase use --add

  1. Choose the language of choice

  2. If you want, you can enforce eslint on the project and after this the cloud function is set up and the directory structure looks as follows.

  3. We will write our cloud function in index.js. So let’s take a look at index.js
const functions = require('firebase-functions');

// // Create and Deploy Your First Cloud Functions
// // https://firebase.google.com/docs/functions/write-firebase-functions
//
// exports.helloWorld = functions.https.onRequest((request, response) => {
// response.send("Hello from Firebase!");
// });

 

As we can see there is a sample function already given, we don’t need that sample function so we will remove it and will write the logic for sending mail. Before that we need to acquire the key for service accounts so that admin functionality can be accessed in the cloud function. So for that go to project settings and then service accounts and click on Generate New Private Key  and save it as serviceKey.json

  1. Now the directory structure will look like this after adding the clientKey.json and serviceKey.json

  2. We will use node-mailer for sending mails in cloud functions and as there is a limitation on the gmail account to send only 500 mails in a day, we can use third party services like sendGrid and others for sending mails with firebase. Configure node-mailer for sending mails as
const nodemailer = require('nodemailer');

const gmailEmail = functions.config().gmail.email;
const gmailPassword = functions.config().gmail.password;
const mailTransport = nodemailer.createTransport({
service: 'gmail',
auth: {
user: gmailEmail,
pass: gmailPassword
}
});

 

Also set the environment variables for the cloud functions like email and password:

firebase functions:config:set gmail.email="Email ID" gmail.password="Password"

 

  1. Logic for sending Greeting Mail on user registration
exports.greetingMail = functions.auth.user().onCreate((user) => {
const email = user.email;
const displayName = user.displayName;

return sendGreetingMail(email, displayName);
});

function sendGreetingMail(email, displayName) {
const mailOptions = {
from: `${APP_NAME}<noreply@firebase.com>`,
to: email,
};

mailOptions.subject = `Welcome to Badgeyay`;
mailOptions.text = `Hey ${displayName || ''}! Welcome to Badgeyay. We welcome you onboard and pleased to offer you service.`;
return mailTransport.sendMail(mailOptions).then(() => {
return console.log('Welcome mail sent to: ', email)
}).catch((err) => {
console.error(err.message);
});
}

 

Function will get triggered on creation of user in firebase and calls the greeting mail function with parameters as the email id of the registered user and the Display name. Then a default template is used to send mail to the recipient and Logged on successful submission.

  1. Currently firebase admin sdk doesn’t support the functionality to send verification mail but the client SDK does. So the approach which is followed in badgeyay is that admin SDK will create a custom token and client sdk will use that custom token to sign in and them send verification mail to the user.
exports.sendVerificationMail = functions.auth.user().onCreate((user) => {
const uid = user.uid;
if (user.emailVerified) {
console.log('User has email already verified: ', user.email);
return 0;
} else {
return admin.auth().createCustomToken(uid)
.then((customToken) => {
return firebase.auth().signInWithCustomToken(customToken)
})
.then((curUser) => {
return firebase.auth().onAuthStateChanged((user_) => {
if (!user.emailVerified) {
user_.sendEmailVerification();
return console.log('Verification mail sent: ', user_.email);
} else {
return console.log('Email is already verified: ', user_.email);
}
})
})
.catch((err) => {
console.error(err.message);
})
}
});

 

  1. Now we need to deploy the functions to firebase.
firebase deploy --only functions

 

Link to the respective PR  : Link

 

Topics Involved

  • Firebase Admin SDK
  • Configuring Gmail for third party apps
  • Token Verification and verification mail by client SDK
  • Nodemailer and Express.js

 

Resources

  • Firebase Cloud functions – Link
  • Extending authentication with cloud function – Link
  • Custom Token Verification – Link
  • Nodemailer message configuration – Link
  • Issue discussion on sending verification mail with admin SDK – Link