Implementing Notification Action Buttons in Open Event Frontend

The Open-Event-Frontend allows the event organiser to create access codes for his or her event.  Access codes can be used to password protect hidden tickets reserved for sponsors, members of the press and media. Notifications are an important part of the project. We show each registered user notifications based on their activity. This blog post goes over the implementation of the notification action buttons in the notification panel.

Notification Action Model

The model for Notification action is very simple. It has the following variables:

  1. Subject: The subject of the notification. E.g. ‘event’, ‘order’ etc.
  2. actionType: The action that can be taken by the user for that notification. E.g: ‘view’, ‘submit’.
  3. subjectId: The id of the subject. In case of an event, it will store the event id. Similarly for other cases.
  4. Link: The link to be applied to the button.

import attr from 'ember-data/attr';
import ModelBase from 'open-event-frontend/models/base';
import { belongsTo } from 'ember-data/relationships';

export default ModelBase.extend({
  subject    : attr('string'),
  actionType : attr('string'),
  subjectId  : attr('number'),
  link       : attr('string'),

  notification: belongsTo('notification')
});

Action Button Title

We make use of ember computed property to determine the action button title. The title of the button depends on the subject and the actionType defined in the notification-action model. The actionType can be one of ‘download’, ‘submit’ and ‘view’. If the action type is ‘download’ and the subject is ‘invoice’, then the button title will be “Download Invoice”. Similarly, for other cases, we do the same.

buttonTitle: computed('subject', 'actionType', function() {
    let action;
    const actionType = this.get('actionType');
    switch (actionType) {
      case 'download':
        action = 'Download';
        break;

      case 'submit':
        action = 'Submit';
        break;

      default:
        action = 'View';
    }

    let buttonSubject;
    const subject = this.get('subject');
    switch (subject) {
      case 'event-export':
        buttonSubject = ' Event';
        break;

      case 'event':
        buttonSubject = ' Event';
        break;

      case 'invoice':
        buttonSubject = ' Invoice';
        break;

      case 'order':
        buttonSubject = ' Order';
        break;

      case 'tickets-pdf':
        buttonSubject = ' Tickets';
        break;

      case 'event-role':
        buttonSubject = ' Invitation Link';
        break;

      case 'session':
        buttonSubject = ' Session';
        break;

      case 'call-for-speakers':
        if (this.get('actionType') === 'submit') {
          buttonSubject = ' Proposal';
        } else {
          buttonSubject = ' Call for Speakers';
        }
        break;

      default:
        // Nothing here.
    }

    return action + buttonSubject;
  })

Action Button Route

The route that the button will lead to depends on the subject of the action. If the link is provided in the notification action, we simply set it on the button otherwise we use the subject to derive the route name. For e.g., if the subject is an event, then the route will be “events.view”.

/**
   * The route name to which the action button will direct the user to.
   */
  buttonRoute: computed('subject', function() {
    const subject = this.get('subject');
    let routeName;
    switch (subject) {
      case 'event-export':
        routeName = 'events.view';
        break;

      case 'event':
        routeName = 'events.view';
        break;

      case 'invoice':
        routeName = 'orders.view';
        break;

      case 'order':
        routeName = 'orders.view';
        break;

      default:
      // Nothing here.
    }
    return routeName;
  })

Template

We simply check if the link exists or not. If it does then we simply use it otherwise we use the computed button route name.

{{#if action.link}}
     {{#link-to action.link tagName='button' class='ui blue button'}}
         {{t action.buttonTitle}}
         {{/link-to}}
{{else}}
    {{#link-to action.buttonRoute action.subjectId tagName='button' class='ui blue button'}}
         {{t action.buttonTitle}}
         {{/link-to}}
{{/if}}

References

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Integrating System Roles API in Open Event Frontend

The Eventyay system supports different system roles and allows to set panel permissions for every role. The system supports two inbuilt roles namely Admin and Super Admin. The users having access to permissions panel can create new custom system roles and define set of panel permissions for them. Also the users are provided with the option of editing and deleting any system role except the two inbuilt system roles. The feature is implemented using custom-system-roles and panel-permissions API on the server.

Adding route for system-roles

The route for custom-system-system roles is defined which contains a model returning user permissions, system roles and the panel permissions. The model is defined as async so that the execution is paused while fetching the data from the store by adding the await expression.

async model() {
 return {
   userPermissions  : await this.get('store').findAll('user-permission'),
   systemRoles      : await this.get('store').findAll('custom-system-role'),
   panelPermissions : await this.get('store').findAll('panel-permission')
 };
},

The route created above gets all the data for user permissions, system-roles and panel permissions which is later used by the template for rendering of data.

Adding model for system-roles and panel-permissions

The model for system-roles is created which contains the ‘name’ attribute of type string and a relationship with panel permissions. Every system role can have multiple panel permissions, therefore a hasMany relationship is defined in the model.

export default ModelBase.extend({
 name: attr('string'),

 panelPermissions: hasMany('panelPermission')
});

Similarly, the model for panel-permissions is added to the models directory. The defined model contains ‘panelName’ as an attribute of type string and a bool value canAccess, defining if the panel is accessible by any role or not.

export default ModelBase.extend({
 panelName : attr('string'),
 canAccess : attr('boolean')
});

Defining controller for system-roles

The controller for system-roles is defined in the controllers/admin/permissions directory. The action for adding, updating and deleting system roles are defined in the controller. While adding the system roles, all the panels are fetched and checked which panel permissions are selected by the admin. A special property namely ‘isChecked’ is added to every panel permission checkbox which toggles on change. If the property is set true the corresponding panel is added to the panel permissions relationship of corresponding role. If no panel is selected, an error message to select atleast one panel is displayed.

deleteSystemRole(role) {
 this.set('isLoading', true);
 role.destroyRecord()
  ...
  // Notify success or failure
},
addSystemRole() {
 this.set('isLoading', true);
 let panels = this.get('panelPermissions');

 panels.forEach(panel => {
   if (panel.isChecked) {
     this.get('role.panelPermissions').addObject(panel);
   } else {
     this.get('role.panelPermissions').removeObject(panel);
   }
 });
 if (!this.get('role.panelPermissions').length) {
  // Notification to select atleast one panel
 } else {
   this.get('role').save()
    // Notify success or failure
 }
},
updatePermissions() {
 this.set('isLoading', true);
 this.get('model.userPermissions').save()
  ...
  // Notify success or failure
}

The actions defined above in the controller can be used in template by passing the appropriate parameters if required. The addSystemRole action makes a POST request to server for creating a new system role, the updatePermissions action makes a PATCH request for updating the existing system role and the deleteSystemRole action makes a delete request to the server for deleting the role.

Adding data to template for system-roles

The data obtained from the model defined in route is rendered in the template for system-roles. A loop for showing all system roles is added to the template with the name attribute containing the name of system role and another loop is added to display the panel permissions for the corresponding role.

{{#each model.systemRoles as |role|}}
 <tr>
   <td>{{role.name}}</td>
   <td>
     <div class="ui bulleted list">
       {{#each role.panelPermissions as |permission|}}
         <div class="item">{{concat permission.panelName ' panel'}}</div>
       {{/each}}
     </div>
   </td>
   <td>
    // Buttons for editing and deleting roles
   </td>
 </tr>
{{/each}}

A modal is to the component for creating and editing system roles. The data from this template is passed to the modal where the existing permissions are already checked and can be modified by the admins.

Resources

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Integrating Event Roles API in Open Event Frontend

The Eventyay system supports different type of roles for an event like Attendee, organizer, co-organizer, track-organizer, moderator and the registrar. Every role has certain set of permissions such as Create, Read, Update, Delete. The Admin of the system is allowed to change the permissions for any role. The interface for updating the even role permissions was already available on the server but was not integrated on the frontend. The system is now integrated with the API and allows admin to change event role permission for any role.

Adding model for event role permissions

The model for event role permissions is added to the models directory. The model contains the attributes like canDelete, canUpdate, canCreate, canRead and the relationship with event role and the service.

export default ModelBase.extend({
 canDelete : attr('boolean'),
 canUpdate : attr('boolean'),
 canCreate : attr('boolean'),
 canRead   : attr('boolean'),

 role        : belongsTo('role'),
 service     : belongsTo('service'),
 serviceName : computed.alias('service.name')
});

The above defined model ensures that every permission belongs to a role and service. An alias is declared in the model using the computed property which is later used in the controller to sort the permissions according to service name in lexicographical order.

Adding route for event roles

The route for event role is created which contains model returning an object containing the list of roles, services and permissions. The model is defined as async so that the execution is paused while fetching the data from the store by adding the await expression.

export default Route.extend({
 titleToken() {
   return this.get('l10n').t('Event Roles');
 },
 async model() {
   return {
     roles       : ['Attendee', 'Co-organizer', 'Moderator', 'Organizer', 'Track Organizer', 'Registrar'],
     services    : await this.get('store').query('service', {}),
     permissions : await this.get('store').query('event-role-permission', { 'page[size]': 30 })
   };
 }
});

The route created above queries the data for roles, services and permissions which is later used by the template for rendering of the data obtained.

Adding controller for event roles

The controller for event roles is added to the controllers/admin/permissions directory. The computed property is used to sort the services obtained from model lexicographically and the permissions are sorted by the help of alias created in the model.

services: computed('model', function() {
 return this.get('model.services').sortBy('name');
}),
sortDefinition : ['serviceName'],
permissions    : computed.sort('model.permissions', 'sortDefinition'),
actions        : {
 updatePermissions() {
   this.set('isLoading', true);
   this.get('model.permissions').save()
     .then(() => {
       // Notify success and add Error handler
      }
   }
}

An action named updatePermissions is defined which is triggered when the admin updates and saves the permissions for any role where a PATCH request is made to the server in order to update the permissions.

Rendering data in the template

The data obtained from the model is manipulated in the controller and is rendered to the table in the event-roles template. Every role is fetched from the model and added to the template, all the permissions in sorted order are obtained from the controller and matched with the current role name. The relationship of permissions with role is used to check if its title is equal to the the current role. The permissions are updated accordingly, if the role title is equal to current role.

<tbody>
 {{#each model.roles as |role|}}
   <tr>
     <td>{{role}}</td>
     {{#each permissions as |permission|}}
       {{#if (eq permission.role.titleName role)}}
         <td>
           {{ui-checkbox label=(t 'Create') checked=permission.canCreate onChange=(action (mut permission.canCreate))}}
           <br>
           {{ui-checkbox label=(t 'Read') checked=permission.canRead onChange=(action (mut permission.canRead))}}
           <br>
           {{ui-checkbox label=(t 'Update') checked=permission.canUpdate onChange=(action (mut permission.canUpdate))}}
           <br>
           {{ui-checkbox label=(t 'Delete') checked=permission.canDelete onChange=(action (mut permission.canDelete))}}
         </td>
       {{/if}}
     {{/each}}
   </tr>
 {{/each}}
</tbody>

After rendering the data as shown above, the checkbox for permissions of different services for different roles are checked or unchecked depending upon the bool value of corresponding permission. The admin can update the permissions by checking or unchecking the checkbox and saving the changes made.

Resources

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Adding Speakers Page in Open Event Frontend

Open Event Frontend earlier displayed all the speakers of an event on the main info page only, now a separate route for speakers is created and a separate page is added to display the speakers of an event. The design and layout of speakers page is kept similar to that on Open Event Web app. The info page only shows the featured speakers for an event and the complete list of speakers with additional information is present on speakers route.

Getting the event speakers data

The event data is obtained from the public model and a query is made for the speakers to get the required data. The speakers are fetched only for the sessions which are accepted, this is done by applying a filter while the query is made.

async model() {
 const eventDetails = this.modelFor('public');
 return {
   event    : eventDetails,
   speakers : await eventDetails.query('speakers', {
     filter: [
       {
         name : 'sessions',
         op   : 'any',
         val  : {
           name : 'state',
           op   : 'eq',
           val  : 'accepted'
         }
       }
     ]
   })
 };
}

Adding template for displaying speakers

A template is added to display three speakers in a row. The speakers data obtained from the model is looped through and details of every speaker is passed to the speaker-item component, which handles the design and layout for every item in the speakers list.

<div class="ui stackable grid container">
 {{#each model.speakers as |speaker|}}
   <div class="five wide column speaker-column">
     {{public/speaker-item speaker=speaker}}
   </div>
 {{/each}}
</div>

Adding component for speaker-item

A component for displaying the speaker-item is added to templates/component/public directory. The component contains of an accordion which displays the speaker details like biography, social links and the sessions that would be taken by him.

{{#ui-accordion}}
 <div class="title">
   <div class="ui">
     <img alt="speaker" class="ui medium rounded image" src="{{if speaker.photo.iconImageUrl speaker.image '/images/placeholders/avatar.png'}}">
    ...
    ... 
    ...
    // Speaker Details
   </div>
 </div>
{{/ui-accordion}}

The accordion with speaker image and other details appears for every speaker of an event.

Resources

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Adding a Countdown to Orders Page in Open Event Frontend

This blog post will illustrate how you can add a countdown to orders page which on finishing expires the ticket in Open Event. In Open Event we allow some predefined time for users to fill in their details and once the time expires order gets expired and tickets get released. Users can order the tickets again if they want.

We start by adding a createdAt field to orders model so that we can keep track of remaining time. To calculate the time when the order should expire we add predefined time in which user should fill their details to createdAt time. In this way, we get the time when the order will expire.

So now to calculate the remaining time we just subtract the expiring time from current time. And then we render this data into the template. We define getRemainingTime property in our template and fetch the data for that property with help of javascript.

To see the template code visit this link.

The challenge here is to update the time remaining after every second. For this, we take the help of ember runloop. The run.later() function of ember runloop helps us to calculate the property after every second and set it. Code for setting the remaining time with the help of javascript is given below.

// app/components/forms/orders/order-form.js

getRemainingTime: computed('data', function() {
    let willExpireAt = this.get('data.createdAt').add(10, 'minutes');
    this.timer(willExpireAt, this.get('data.identifier'));
  }),

  timer(willExpireAt, orderIdentifier) {
    run.later(() => {
      let currentTime = moment();
      let diff = moment.duration(willExpireAt.diff(currentTime));
      this.set('getRemainingTime', moment.utc(diff.asMilliseconds()).format('mm:ss'));
      if (diff > 0) {
        this.timer(willExpireAt, orderIdentifier);
      } else {
        this.get('data').reload();
        this.get('router').transitionTo('orders.expired', orderIdentifier);
      }
    }, 1000);
  }

 

As given in the code. We pass expiring time and order’s model instance to the timer function. Timer function calculates the remaining time and sets it to getRemainingTime property of template. Timer function runs after every second with the help of run.later() function of ember runloop. To format the remaining time into MM:SS we take help of moment.js library and format the data accordingly.

Once the remaining time is less than zero (time expires) we reload the model and transition current route to expired route. We do not have to set order status as expired inside the FE. Server sets the order as expired after the predefined time. So we just reload the model from the server and we get the updated status of the order.

Resources:
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Adding Helper and Adding Action Buttons to Orders List in Open Event Frontend

This blog post will illustrate how to add a helper to orders list and add action buttons to orders list to delete and cancel an order in Open Event Frontend. To cancel or delete an order item we need to communicate to the server. The API endpoints to which we communicate are:

  • PATCH        /v1/orders/{order_identifier}
  • DELETE    /v1/orders/{orders_identifier}

We will define the action buttons in ui-table component of open event frontend. We will use the cell-actions file to define the cell buttons that will be present in cell-actions column. The following handlebars code will render the buttons on website.

//components/ui-table/cell/events/view/tickets/orders/cell-actions.hbs

class="ui vertical compact basic buttons"> {{#if (and (not-eq record.status 'cancelled') (can-modify-order record))}} {{#ui-popup content=(t 'Cancel order') click=(action (confirm (t 'Are you sure you would like to cancel this Order?') (action cancelOrder record))) class='ui icon button' position='left center'}} class="delete icon"> {{/ui-popup}} {{/if}} {{#if (can-modify-order record)}} {{#ui-popup content=(t 'Delete order') click=(action (confirm (t 'Are you sure you would like to delete this Order?') (action deleteOrder record))) class='ui icon button' position='left center'}} class="trash icon"> {{/ui-popup}} {{/if}} {{#ui-popup content=(t 'Resend order confirmation') class='ui icon button' position='left center'}} class="mail outline icon"> {{/ui-popup}}

 

In above code you can see two things. First is can-modify-order which is a helper. Helper is used to simplify conditional logics which cannot be easily placed in handlebars. Second thing is action. There are two actions defined: cancelOrder and deleteOrder. We will see implementation of these later. First let’s see how we define can-modify-order helper.

In can-modify-order helper we want to return true or false in case we want cancel button and delete button to display or not respectively. We write the code of can-modify-order in helpers/can-modify-order.js file. When we want to get result from this helper we call it from handlebars file and pass any parameter that we want to use in helper. Code for can-modify-order helper is given below.

// helpers/can-modify-order.js

import Helper from '@ember/component/helper';

export function canModifyOrder(params) {
 let [order] = params;
 if (order.amount !== null && order.amount > 0) {
   // returns false if order is paid and completed
   return order.status !== 'completed';
 }
 // returns true for free ticket
 return true;
}

export default Helper.helper(canModifyOrder);

 

We extract the parameter and store it in order variable. We see if it satisfies our conditions we return true else false.

Now lets see how we can define actions to perform delete and cancel action on a order. We define these actions in controllers section of app. After performing suitable operation with order we call save to update modified order and destroyRecord() to delete an order. Let see the code implementation for these actions.

actions: {
   deleteOrder(order) {
     this.set('isLoading', true);
     order.destroyRecord()
       .then(() => {
         this.get('model').reload();
         this.notify.success(this.get('l10n').t('Order has been deleted successfully.'));
       })
       .catch(() => {
         this.notify.error(this.get('l10n').t('An unexpected error has occurred.'));
       })
       .finally(() => {
         this.set('isLoading', false);
       });
   },
   cancelOrder(order) {
     this.set('isLoading', true);
     order.set('status', 'cancelled');
     order.save()
       .then(() => {
         this.notify.success(this.get('l10n').t('Order has been cancelled successfully.'));
       })
       .catch(() => {
         this.notify.error(this.get('l10n').t('An unexpected error has occurred.'));
       })
       .finally(() => {
         this.set('isLoading', false);
       });
   }

 
After defining these actions, buttons in the orders list start working. In this way, we can make use of helper to simplify the conditional logic inside templates and define proper actions.

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How to Make Promotional Codes Applicable on Tickets During Ordering in Open Event Frontend

This blog illustrate how to enable application of promotional codes on tickets during ordering tickets in Open Event Frontend to avail discounts and access to special tickets. Open event allows organizers to add some promotional codes on some tickets, which can be used by users to avail additional offers on tickets while ordering. Promotional codes can be of three types:

  1. Discount Codes: Allows customers to buy a ticket at discounted rates.
  2. Access Codes: Allows customers to access some hidden tickets which are accessible only to special customers.
  3. Discount + Access Code: Allows customer to access special tickets and avail discount at the same time.

Creating a discount/access code:

Organizers and admin can create an access code or a discount code from the event dashboard. They can specify the validity period of the code and can also specify the tickets on which the code will be applicable.

Validating promotional code after user enters the code:

User is allowed to enter the promotional code on events page upon selecting the tickets. IF promotional code is valid then suitable discount is provided on applicable tickets and if promotional code is an access code then hidden tickets for which the promotional code is valid are shown.

To check the validity of the promotional code we deal with the following APIs on the open event server:

  • GET             /v1/discount-codes/{Code}              (For Discount code)
  • GET             /v1/access-codes/{Code}                  (For Access code)

Code snippet to check the validity for access code is given below:

let promotionalCode = this.get('promotionalCode');
 let order = this.get('order');
   try {
     let accessCode = await this.get('store').findRecord('access-code', promotionalCode, {});
     order.set('accessCode', accessCode);
     let tickets = await accessCode.get('tickets');
     tickets.forEach(ticket => {
     ticket.set('isHidden', false);
     this.get('tickets').addObject(ticket);
     this.get('accessCodeTickets').addObject(ticket);
     this.set('invalidPromotionalCode', false);
  });
  } catch (e) {
     this.set('invalidPromotionalCode', true);
  }

 

Full code can be seen here https://github.com/fossasia/open-event-frontend/blob/development/app/components/public/ticket-list.js

Similarly for discount code we fetch the details of the discount code via the api and then validate the code. After the validation we apply the discount to the tickets applicable. Code snippet for the discount code part is given below:

try {
  let discountCode = await this.get('store').findRecord('discount-code', promotionalCode, { include: 'tickets' });
  let discountType = discountCode.get('type');
  let discountValue = discountCode.get('value');
  order.set('discountCode', discountCode);
  let tickets = await discountCode.get('tickets');
  tickets.forEach(ticket => {
     let ticketPrice = ticket.get('price');
     if (discountType === 'amount') {
       ticket.set('discount', Math.min(ticketPrice, discountValue));
       this.get('discountedTickets').addObject(ticket);
     } else {
       ticket.set('discount', ticketPrice * (discountValue / 100));
       this.get('discountedTickets').addObject(ticket);
     }
     this.set('invalidPromotionalCode', false);
  });
} catch (e) {
   if (this.get('invalidPromotionalCode')) {
      this.set('invalidPromotionalCode', true);
   }
}

 

Full code can be seen https://github.com/fossasia/open-event-frontend/blob/development/app/components/public/ticket-list.js

After promotional codes are verified we apply them to the selected tickets. In this way we apply the promotional codes to the tickets.

Resources

 

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Adding Panel to Add Event Types in Admin Dashboard of Open Event Frontend

This blog will illustrate how to add a new section to admin dashboard of Open Event Frontend which allows admin to add event types. For this we need modals to display a form by which we can edit or add a new event type and we need to create a new route admin/content/events. To create a new route we use ember CLI command:

ember g route admin/content/events

The primary end point of Open Event API with which we are concerned with for creating a new event type or topic is:

GET/POST/DELETE        /v1/event-types

The model concerned with event types is:

 name : attr('string'),
 slug : attr('string'),

 events: hasMany('event')

 

This model is very basic and contains only name and slug and a relationship to event model. Next we want to fetch the existing event types and display them in table. We write queries which fetches data in event-type model in the route file admin/content/events.js.

import Route from '@ember/routing/route';
export default Route.extend({
 titleToken() {
   return this.get('l10n').t('Social Links');
 },
 async model() {
   return {
     'eventTopics': await this.get('store').query('event-topic', {}),
     'eventTypes': await this.get('store').query('event-type', {})
   };
 }
});

 

This will fetch the data in our model. Next we need to display this data in a template for which we define a table that will display each event type.

<button class="ui blue button {{if device.isMobile 'fluid'}}" {{action 'openNewEventTypeModal'}}>{{t 'Add New Event Type'}}</button> 

      <table class="ui celled table">
         <tbody>
           {{#each model.eventTypes as |eventType|}}
             <tr>
               <td>
                 {{eventType.name}}
               </td>
             </tr>
           {{/each}}
         </tbody>
       </table>

 

We have two buttons that are used to edit or delete a event type. Both buttons open up a modal to achieve this functionality. We also have a “Add new Event Type” button at the top. This buttons opens up a modal and sends out a action to its controller when user successfully fills up the name of the event type. Let us take a look at the code of our controller that saves/deletes our event type to server.

addEventType() {
     this.set('isLoading', true);
     this.get('eventType').save()
       .then(() => {
        // Success message
       })
       .catch(()=> {
        //failure message
       })
       .finally(() => {
         this.set('isLoading', false);
       });
   }

 

deleteEventType(eventType) {
     this.set('isLoading', true);
     eventType.destroyRecord()
       .then(() => {
        // Success
       })
       .catch(()=> {
        //failure
       })
       .finally(() => {
         this.set('isLoading', false);
       });
   }

 

In addNewEventType() function we take the data from the form and save the model, which eventually sends POST request to save the new Event Type on server. This returns a JavaScript promise and we handle it via then and catch. It goes to then block if promise resolves and goes to catch is promise rejects/fails.

Similarly in delete function we take the eventType which is passed as model of event-type object and call destroyRecord() function which eventually sends out a DELETE request to server and data gets deleted. Here also we handle the response via resolve and reject depicted with then and catch respectively.

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Implementing Accepting and Rejecting Proposals in Open Event Frontend

This blog post will illustrate how to add buttons to accept and reject proposal and making them functional. Sessions tab in event dashboard communicates with the following APIs of Open Event Server.

  • GET                    /v1/sessions
  • PATCH              /v1/sessions
What is meant by accepting or rejecting a session in open event?

Sessions are part of event which include one or many speakers. Speakers can propose one or many sessions for a event. Now it is duty of organizer to accept some proposals and reject others. Open event provides two options to accept or reject a proposal i.e. with email or without email.

For this we need to send a key value pair which includes whether we want to send email or not along with other parameters which include current state of session and other important properties. A typical request to alter state of session looks like this.

{
  "data": {
    "attributes": {
      "title": "Micropython Session",
      "level": 1,
      "starts-at": "2017-06-01T10:00:00.500127+00:00",
      "ends-at": "2017-06-01T11:00:00.500127+00:00",
      "created-at": "2017-05-01T01:24:47.500127+00:00",
      "is-mail-sent": false,
      "send-email": true,
    },
    "type": "session",
    "id": "1"
  }
}
Implementing in frontend

We start by providing two buttons for a pending session. One to accept the session and other to reject the session.

On clicking either accept or reject button we get two options to choose i.e. with email and without email. Depending on what organizer chooses a action is fired from the template and sent to controller. Template code for these buttons looks something like this.

class=“ui vertical compact basic buttons”> {{#unless (eq record.state ‘accepted’)}} {{#ui-dropdown class=‘ui icon bottom right pointing dropdown button’}} class=“green checkmark icon”>

class=“menu”>

class=“item” {{action acceptProposal record true}}>{{t ‘With email’}}

 


class=“item” {{action acceptProposal record false}}>{{t ‘Without email’}}

 

      </div>
    {{/ui-dropdown}}
  {{/unless}}
  {{#unless (eq record.state 'rejected')}}
    {{#ui-dropdown class='ui icon bottom right pointing dropdown button'}}
      <i class="red remove icon"></i>

class=“menu”>

class=“item” {{action rejectProposal record true}}>{{t ‘With email’}}

 


class=“item” {{action rejectProposal record false}}>{{t ‘Without email’}}

 

      </div>
    {{/ui-dropdown}}
  {{/unless}}
</div>

We can see that for with email button we trigger accept proposal button with two parameters record and true. Record contains the instance of session and true signifies that we are sending email. Similar is the case with without email button. Controller for these actions looks something like this.

acceptProposal(session, sendEmail) {
      session.set('sendEmail', sendEmail);
      session.set('state', 'accepted');
      session.set('isMailSent', sendEmail);
      this.set('isLoading', true);
      session.save()
        .then(() => {
          sendEmail ? this.notify.success(this.get('l10n').t('Session has been accepted and speaker has been notified via email.'))
            : this.notify.success(this.get('l10n').t('Session has been accepted'));
        })
        .catch(() => {
          this.notify.error(this.get('l10n').t('An unexpected error has occurred.'));
        })
        .finally(() => {
          this.set('isLoading', false);
        });
    },
    rejectProposal(session, sendEmail) {
      session.set('sendEmail', sendEmail);
      session.set('state', 'rejected');
      session.set('isMailSent', sendEmail);
      this.set('isLoading', true);
      session.save()
        .then(() => {
          sendEmail ? this.notify.success(this.get('l10n').t('Session has been rejected and speaker has been notified via email.'))
            : this.notify.success(this.get('l10n').t('Session has been rejected'));
        })
        .catch(() => {
          this.notify.error(this.get('l10n').t('An unexpected error has occurred.'));
        })
        .finally(() => {
          this.set('isLoading', false);
        });
    }

For accepting with email we set sendEmail field to true and send the query to server. Similarly for reject proposal action we follow same procedure.

Conclusion

Implementing buttons like these, and defining proper actions like these we are able to change the state of session with options to send email or not.

Resources

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Adding Online Payment Support in Online Event Frontend via Stripe

Open Event Frontend involves ticketing system which supports both paid and free tickets. To buy a paid ticket Open Event provides several options such as debit card, credit card, cheque, bank transfer and onsite payments. So to add support for debit and credit card payments Open Event uses stripe checkout. Using stripe users can enter their card details and pay for their ticket.

Given below are some steps which are to be followed for successfully charging a user for ticket using his/her card.

  • We get publishable key for organizer’s stripe account using OAuth. See this blog.
  • We render stripe checkout button using stripe publishable key. This helps us identify which user to credit after payment.
  • After clicking checkout button user is prompted to enter his/her card details and verify payment.
  • After user’s verification stripe generates a payment token is which is used by open event frontend to charge the user for stipulated amount.
  • We send this token to open event server which processes the token and charge the user.
  • We get error or success message from open event server as per the process outcome.

To render the stripe checkout button we use ember-cli-stripe. Below is the code which helps us to understand how stripe checkout button is rendered.

// app/templates/orders/placed.hbs 

{{stripe-checkout
    locale='auto'
    name="Open Event"
    description=paymentDescription
    amount=paymentAmount
    key=model.event.stripeAuthorization.stripePublishableKey
    onToken=(action "processStripeToken")
    onClosed=(action "checkoutClosed")
    onOpened=(action "checkoutOpened")
}}

 

Full code can be seen here.

We see that we pass different parameters to stripe button which helps stripe identify how to render the button and what information to display. We have also passed the actions onToken(), onClosed() and onOpened(). All these actions are triggered at different instances based on what event occurs.

onToken(): This action is triggered when user has verified his/her purchase and we stripe has generated the payment token. Stripe passes the token back to client (open event frontend server) to process. We have handled this error via different name “processStripeToken()”. We will see cose for these actions below.

onClosed(): This action is called when checkout prompt is closed. We have not used this action in open event frontend. But this can be used to trigger some event in case your application need some action when checkout prompt is closed.

onOpened(): This action is called when checkout prompt is opened. We have not used this action in open event frontend. But this can be used to trigger some event in case your application need some action when checkout prompt is opened.

Code for these actions are given below. Full code file can be seen here.

//  app/controllers/orders/placed.js 

processStripeToken(token) {
   // Send this token to server to process payment
   let order = this.get('model');
   let chargePayload = {
     'data': {
       'attributes': {
         'stripe'            : token.id,
         'paypal_payer_id'   : null,
         'paypal_payment_id' : null
       },
       'type': 'charge'
     }
   };
   let config = {
     skipDataTransform: true
   };
   chargePayload = JSON.stringify(chargePayload);
   return this.get('loader').post(`orders/${order.identifier}/charge`, chargePayload, config)
     .then(charge => {
       if (charge.data.attributes.status) {
         this.get('notify').success(charge.data.attributes.message);
         this.transitionToRoute('orders.view', order.identifier);
       } else {
         this.get('notify').error(charge.data.attributes.message);
       }
     });
 }

 

In above code snippet for processStipeToken() we are processing the stripe payment token received from stripe after user verifies his/her payment. We pass this token to charge endpoint of open event server. After charging the user server send a response which is displayed on frontend.

In this way we achieve the functionality of adding stripe payment support in open event frontend. Please follow the links below for further clarification and detailed overview.

Resources:
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