Handling Requests for hasMany Relationships in Open Event Front-end

In Open Event Front-end we use Ember Data and JSON API specs to integrate the application with the server. Ember Data provides an easy way to handle API requests, however it does not support a direct POST for saving bulk data which was the problem we faced while implementing event creation using the API.

In this blog we will take a look at how we implemented POST requests for saving hasMany relationships, using an example of sessions-speakers route to see how we saved the tracks, microlocations & session-types. Lets see how we did it.

Fetching the data from the server

Ember by default does not support hasMany requests for getting related model data. However we can use external add on which enable the hasMany Get requests, we use ember-data-has-many-query which is a great add on for querying hasMany relations of a model.

let data = this.modelFor('events.view.edit');
data.tracks = data.event.get('tracks');
data.microlocations = data.event.get('microlocations');
data.sessionTypes = data.event.get('sessionTypes');
return RSVP.hash(data);

In the above example we are querying the tracks, microlocations & sessionTypes which are hasMany relationships, related to the events model. We can simply do a to do a GET request for the related model.

data.event.get('tracks');

In the above example we are retrieving the all the tracks of the event.

Sending a POST request for hasMany relationship
Ember currently does not saving bulk data POST requests for hasMany relations. We solved this by doing a POST request for individual data of the hasMany array.

We start with creating a `promises` array which contains all the individual requests. We then iterate over all the hasMany relations & push it to the `promises` array. Now each request is an individual promise.

let promises = [];

promises.push(this.get('model.event.tracks').toArray().map(track => track.save()));
promises.push(this.get('model.event.sessionTypes').toArray().map(type => type.save()));
promises.push(this.get('model.event.microlocations').toArray().map(location => location.save()));

Once we have all the promises we then use RSVP to make the POST requests. We make use of all() method which takes an array of promises as parameter and resolves all the promises. If the promises are not resolved successfully then we simply notify the user using the notify service, else we redirect to the home page.

RSVP.Promise.all(promises)
  .then(() => {
    this.transitionToRoute('index');
  }, function() {
    this.get('notify').error(this.l10n.t(Data did not save. Please try again'));
  });

The result of this we can now retrieve & create new tracks, microlocations & sessionTypes on sessions-speakers route.

Thank you for reading the blog, you can check the source code for the example here.

Resources

 

Making Autocomplete Box Compatible with the Search Bar using Angular in Susper

A major problem in Susper was that we were using the same components on different pages, with different styling properties. A major issue was that the Autocomplete box was not properly aligned in the index page and looked like this:

This was happening because the autocomplete box width was set for 634 px, a width perfect for the search bar in the results page. The index page had a search bar of width 534 px, and the autocomplete box was too large for that.
Here is how the issue was solved:

  1. Changing the suggestion box html code:

id=“sug-box” class=“suggestion-box” *ngIf=”results.length0”>

</div>

The code uses *ngIf which is why setting the autocomplete box width using the typescript files becomes impossible. *ngIf does not load the component into the DOM until there are results, hence we didnot have the autocomplete box in the DOM until after the query was typed in the search bar. That was why we could not set its width, hence it was decided to remove this attribute. Using the ‘hidecomponent emitter’ is a better option here (used in the typescript file).

@Output() hidecomponent: EventEmitter<any> = new EventEmitter<any>();
if (this.results.length === 0) {
this.hidecomponent.emit(1);
} else {
this.hidecomponent.emit(0);
}

See autocomplete.component.ts for the complete code.

  1. It is now required to dynamically change the id of the suggestion-box depending on the page it is on, and apply the correct CSS.

Here is the html code:

<div [id]=”getID()” class=“suggestion-box” *ngIf=“results”>

The id of the suggestion box will now depend on the value returned from the function getID(), defined as follows:

getID() {
if ( this.route.url.toString() === ‘/’) {
  return ‘index-sug-box’;
} else {
  return ‘sug-box’
}
}
  • We first check if the route url is simply ‘/’ (which implies it is in the index page).
  • If yes the id is set to index-sug-box otherwise to sug-box.

Now we can write extra CSS properties for the index-sug-box id as follows:

#index-sug-box{
width: 586px;
}

References:

  1. For basic javascript functions: https://www.w3schools.com/js/js_functions.asp
  2. To understand components in Angular: https://angular.io/api/core/Component

 

Implementing Speakers Call API in Open Event Frontend

This article will illustrate how to display the speakers call details on the call for speakers page in the Open Event Frontend project using the Open Event Orga API. The API endpoints which will be mainly focussing on for fetching the speaker call details are:

GET /v1/speakers-calls/{speakers_call_id}

In the case of Open Event, the speakers are asked to submit their proposal beforehand if they are interested in giving some talk. For the same purpose, we have a section on the event’s website called as Call for Speakers on the event’s public page where the details about the speakers call are present along with the button Submit Proposal which redirects to the link where they can upload the proposal if the speakers call is open. Since the speakers call page is present on the event’s public page so the route which will be concerned with will be public/index route and its subroute public/index/cfs in the application. As the call for speakers details are nested within the events model so we need to first fetch the event and then from there we need to fetch the speaker-calls detail from the model.

The code to fetch the event model looks like this:

model(params) {
return this.store.findRecord('event', params.event_id, { include: 'social-links' });
}

The above model takes care of fetching all the data related to the event but, we can see that speakers call is not included as the parameter. The main reason behind this is the fact that the speakers is not required on each of the public route, rather it is required only for the subroute public/index/cfs route. Let’s see how the code for the speaker-call modal work to fetch the speaker calls detail from the above event model.  

model() {
    const eventDetails = this.modelFor('public');
    return RSVP.hash({
      event        : eventDetails,
      speakersCall : eventDetails.get('speakersCall')
    });
}

In the above code, we made the use of this.modelFor(‘public’) to make the use of the event data fetched in the model of the public route, eliminating the separate API call for the getting the event details in the speaker call route. Next, using the ember’s get method we are fetching the speakers call data from the eventDetails and placing it inside the speakersCall JSON object for using it lately to display speakers call details in public/index subroute.

Until now, we have fetched event details and speakers call details in speakers call subroute but we need to display this on the index page of the sub route. So we will pass the model from file cfs.hbs to call-for-speakers.hbs the code for which looks like this:

{{public/call-for-speakers speakersCall=model.speakersCall}}  

The trickiest part in implementing the speakers call is to check whether the speakers call is open or closed. The code which checks whether the call for speaker has to be open or closed is:

isOpen: computed('startsAt', 'endsAt', function() {
     return moment().isAfter(this.get('startsAt')) && moment().isBefore(this.get('endsAt'));
})

In the above-computed property isOpen of speakers-call model, we are passing the starting time and the ending time of the speakers call. We are then comparing if the starting time is after the current time and the current time is before the ending time than if both conditions satisfy to be true then the speakers call is open else it will be closed.  

Now, we need a template file where we will define how the user interface for call-for-speakers based on the above property, isOpen. The code for displaying UI based on its open or closed status is

  {{#if speakersCall.isOpen}}
    <a class="ui basic green label">{{t 'Open'}} </a>
    <div class="sub header">
      {{t 'Call for Speakers Open until'}} {{moment-format speakersCall.endsAt 'ddd, MMM DD HH:mm A'}}
    </div>
  {{else}}
    <a class="ui basic red label">{{t 'Closed'}}</a>
  {{/if}}

In the above code, we are checking is the speakersCall is open then we show a label open and display the date until which speakers call is opened using the moment helper in the format “ddd, MMM DD HH:mm A” else we show a label closed. The UI for the above code looks like this.

Fig. 1: The heading of speakers call page when the call for speakers is open

The complete UI of the page looks like this.

Fig. 2: The user interface for the speakers call page

The entire code for implementing the speakers call API can be seen here.

To conclude, this is how we efficiently fetched the speakers call details using the Open-Event-Orga speakers call API, ensuring that there is no unnecessary API call to fetch the data.  

Resources:

Firefox Customization for Meilix

Meilix a lightweight operating system can be easily customized. This article talks about the way one must proceed to customize the configuration of Firefox of Meilix or on its own Linux distro and how to copy the configuration file of Firefox directly to the home folder of the user.
Meilix script contains a pref.js file which is responsible for providing the configuration. This file contains various function through which one can edit them according to its need to get the required configuration of its need.

Let’s see an example:

user_pref("browser.startup.homepage", "http://www.google.com/cse/home?cx=partner-pub-6065445074637525:8941524350");

This line is used to set the browser startup page and it can be edited according to user choice to find the same page whenever he starts his Firefox.

There are several lines too which can be edited to make the required changes.

How does this work?

This is the Mozilla User Preference file and should be placed in the location /home/user_name/.mozilla/firefox/*.default/prefs.js. It actually controls the attributes of Firefox preference and set the command from here to change it.

How to use it?

One can directly go and edit it according to the choice to use it.

How meilix script uses it to change the user preference?

As we can see that .mozilla folder should be under the home directory, therefore we copy the .mozilla to the the skel folder, so that it gets automatically copied to the home location and we would be able to use.
There is also a shell script which comes in handy to implement the browser startup page and the script even copies the configuration file.

1.#!/bin/bash

2.# firefox
3.# http://askubuntu.com/questions/73474/how-to-install-firefox-addon-from-command-line-in-scripts
4.for user_name in `ls /home/`
5.do
  6.preferences_file="`echo /home/$user_name/.mozilla/firefox/*.default/prefs.js`"
  7.if [ -f "$preferences_file" ]
  8.then
    9.echo "user_pref(\"browser.startup.homepage\", \"https://google.com/\");" >> $preferences_file
  10.fi
11.done

This file is taken from here. And it used in Meilix to run the script to set the default startup page in Firefox. This will be taken input from the user end from the Meilix Generator webapp and it will change the line 9 url according to the input given by the user.
On line 3, *.default will set automatically by the script itself, it generated randomly.
After that, the script will copy the prefs.js in its location and it will implement the changes.

Links to follow:

Firefox-preference guide
Firefox-editing-configuration

Scaling the logo of the generated events properly in Open Event Webapp

In the Facebook Developer Conference, the logo was too small

27190158-334a5446-5211-11e7-95e8-9690dfe8312e.png

In the Open Tech Summit Event, the logo was too long and increased the height of the navigation bar

77dc9fb0-3966-11e7-92c3-d6321dc98ac7.png

We decide some constraints regarding the width and the height of the logo. We don’t want the width of the logo to exceed greater than 110 pixels in order to not let it become too wide. It would look odd on small and medium screen if barely passable on bigger screens. We also don’t want the logo to become too long so we set a max-height of 45 pixels on the logo. So, we apply a class on the logo element with these properties

.logo-image {
 max-width: 110px;
 max-height: 45px;
}

But simply using these properties doesn’t work properly in some cases as shown in the above screenshots. An alternative approach is to resize the logo appropriately during the generation process itself. There are many different ways in which we can resize the logo. One of them was to scale the logo to a fixed dimension during the generation process. The disadvantage of that approach was that the event logo comes in different size and shapes. So resizing them to a fixed size will change its aspect ratio and it will appear stretched and pixelated. So, that approach is not feasible. We need to think of something different.  After a lot of thinking, we came up with an algorithm for the problem. We know the height of the logo would not be greater than 45px. We calculate the appropriate width and height of the logo, resize the image, and calculate dynamic padding which we add to the anchor element (inside which the image is located) if the height of the image comes out to be less than 45px. This is all done during the generation of the app. Note that the default padding is 5px and we add the extra pixels on top of it. This way, the logo doesn’t appear out of place or pixelated or extra wide and long. The detailed steps are mentioned below

  • Declare variable padding = 5px
  • Get the width, height and aspect ratio of the image.
  • Set the height to 45px and calculate the width according to the aspect ratio. If the width <= 110px, then directly resize the image and no change in padding is necessary
  • If the width > 110px, then make width constant to 110px and calculate height according to the aspect ratio. It will surely come less than 45px. Subtract the difference = (45 – height), divide it by 2 and add it to the padding variable.
  • Apply padding variable on the anchor tag. Now every logo should be displayed nicely and we have fixed the height of the navigation bar = 55px for all cases.

Here is an excerpt of the code. The whole work and discussion can be viewed here

var optimizeLogo = function(image, socket, done) {
 sharp(image).metadata(function(err, metaData) {
   if(err) {
     return done(err);
   }
   var width = metaData.width;
   var height = metaData.height;
   var ratio = width/height;
   var padding = 5;
   var diffHeight = 0;

   height = 45;
   width = Math.floor(45 * ratio);
   if (width > 110) {
     width = 110;
     height = Math.floor(width/ratio);
     diffHeight = 45 - height;
     padding = padding + (diffHeight)/2;
   }
   sharp(image).resize(width, height).toFile(image + '.new', function(err, info) {
     return done(null, padding);
   });
 });
};

It solved the problem. Now the logos of all the events were displaying properly. They were neither too wide, long or short. Here are some screenshots to show the improvements.

Facebook Developer Conference

27262455-d3558540-5474-11e7-852e-ef98888ef647.png

Open Tech Summit 2017

27262033-6f9d2df8-546c-11e7-811b-e35f849072eb.png

Resources:

Ember Mixins used in Open Event Frontend

This post will illustrate how ember mixins are used in the Open Event Frontend to avoid code duplication and to keep it clean to reduce code complexity.

The Open Event application needs forms at several places like at the time of login, for the creation of the event, taking the details of the user, creating discount codes for tickets etc. Every form performs similar actions which taking input and finally storing it in the database. In this process, a set of things keep executing in the background such as continuous form validation which means checking inputted values to ensure they are correctly matched with their type as provided in the validation rules, popping out an error message in case of wrong inputted values, etc. which is common to all the forms. The only thing which changes is the set of validation rules which are unique for every form. So let’s see how we solved this issue using Ember Mixins.

While writing the code, we often run into the situation where we need to use the similar behaviour in different parts of the project. We always try not to duplicate the code and keep finding the ways to DRY ( Don’t Repeat Yourself ) up the code. In Ember, we can share the code in the different parts of the project using Ember.Mixins.

While creating the forms, we mostly have differing templates but the component logic remains same. So we created a mixin form.js which contains all the properties which are common to all the forms. The code mixin contains can be reused throughout different parts of the application and is not a concern of any one route, controller, component, etc. The mixins don’t get instantiated until we pass them into some object, and they get created in the order of which they’re passed in. The code for form.js mixin looks like this.

export default Mixin.create({
  autoScrollToErrors : true,
  autoScrollSpeed    : 200,

  getForm() {
    return this.get('$form');
  },

  onValid(callback) {
    this.getForm().form('validate form');
    if (this.getForm().form('is valid')) {
      callback();
    }
  },
  
  didRender() {
      const $popUps = this.$('.has.popup');
      if ($popUps) {
        $popUps.popup({
          hoverable: true
        });
      }
      let $form = this.$('.ui.form');
      if ($form) {
        $form = $form.first();
        if (this.get('getValidationRules') && $form) {
          $form.form(merge(defaultFormRules, this.getValidationRules()));
        }
      },
  didInsertElement() {
    $.fn.form.settings.rules.date = (value, format = FORM_DATE_FORMAT) => {
      if (value && value.length > 0 && format) {
        return moment(value, format).isValid();
      }
      return true;
    };
  }

The complete code can be seen here.

Let’s start understanding the above code. In the first line, we created a mixin via Ember.Mixin.create() method. We have then specified the property ‘autoScrollToErrors’ to true so in case if there is some error, the form will automatically scroll to the error. The property ‘autoScrollSpeed’ specifies the speed with which the form will auto scroll to show the error. ‘getForm()’ method helps in getting the object which will be passed to the mixin. In ‘onValid()’ method we’re validating the form and passing the callbacks if it is correctly validated. We then have ‘didRender()’ method which renders the popups, checkboxes and form rules. The popups help in showing the errors on the form. In this method, we’re fetching the validation rules which are written in child/subclasses which are using this mixin to create the form.  The validation rules help in validating the form and tells if the value inputted is correct or not. In most of the forms, we have a field which asks for some specific date. The piece of code under ‘didInsertElement()’ helps in validating the date and returns true if it is correct. We have ‘willDestroyElement()’ method which destroys the popup if the window is changed/refreshed.

Let see the use case of the above form mixin. At the time of login, we see a form which asks for the user’s credentials to validate if the user is already registered or not. To create that login form we use form mixin. The code for login-form.js looks like this.

export default Component.extend(FormMixin, {
getValidationRules() {
  
fields : {
        identification: {
          identifier : 'email',
          rules      : [
            {
              type   : 'empty',
              prompt : this.l10n.t('Please enter your email ID')
            },
            {
              type   : 'email',
              prompt : this.l10n.t('Please enter a valid email ID')
            }
          ]
        },
        password: {
          identifier : 'password',
          rules      : [
            {
              type   : 'empty',
              prompt : this.l10n.t('Please enter your password')
            }
          ]
        }
      }
   }
});

The complete code can be found here.

We can see that in above code we are creating the form by extending our FormMixin which means that the form will have all the properties which are part of mixin along with the properties which remain unique to this class. Since the validation rules remain unique per form so we’re also providing the rules (easy to comprehend) which will help in validating the fields.

This is how our forms look like after and before applying validation rules.

Fig. 1: Login form before applying validation rules

          Fig. 2: Login form after applying validation rules

To sum it up, we can say that mixins are of great use when we want to keep our code DRY or reduce the code duplication. It helps in removing the unnecessary inheritance keeping it short. The code written using mixin is lesser complex and easily understandable.

References:

Know the Usage of all Emoji’s on Twitter with loklak Emoji Heatmap

Loklak apps page now has a new app in its store, Emoji Heatmap. This app can be used to see the usage of all the emoji’s in the tweets all over the world in the form of heatmap. So, the major difference between the emoji heatmap and emoji heatmapper apps are heatmapper shows the tweets related to specific search query whereas this heatmapper app, it displays all the tweets which contains emojis.

How do the App fetches and stores the locations

The emoji heatmap uses the loklak search API . The search API needs a query in order to search and output the JSON data. But this app takes no input from the user end to search any query. To make the search dynamic, we are using an existing JSON file from emojiHeatmapper app and loklak-fetcher-client javascript file. From the emoji.json file, we collect the each query item and search it using loklak-fetcher-client. The output json file which we get from loklak-fetcher-client is retrieved into the emojiHeatmap and we extract the location parameter. The location parameter is then stored into the “feature” option of open layers 3 maps.

So, here in the emoji Heatmap app, we iterate over the emoji.json, get different search query each time when we search for it using loklak search API.

Code which adds the location retrieved into feature

  $.getJSON("../emojiHeatmapper/emoji.json", function(json) {
    for (var i = 0; i < json.data.length; i++){
      var query = json.data[i][1];
      // Fetch loklak API data, and fill the vector
      loklakFetcher.getTweets(query, function(tweets) {
        for(var i = 0; i < tweets.statuses.length; i++) {
          if(tweets.statuses[i].location_point !== undefined){
          // Creation of the point with the tweet's coordinates
          //  Coords system swap is required: OpenLayers uses by default
          //  EPSG:3857, while loklak's output is EPSG:4326
            var point = new ol.geom.Point(ol.proj.transform(tweets.statuses[i].location_point, 'EPSG:4326', 'EPSG:3857'));
            vector.addFeature(new ol.Feature({  // Add the point to the data vector
              geometry: point,
              weight: 20
            }));
          }
        }
      });
    }
  });

 

The above function gets has two variables query and point. The query variable stores the data that is being retrieved from the emoji.json file each time it iterates and that query is being sent into the loklak-fetcher-client. Then the point variable is in which the location tracked using the loklak search API is converted into the co-ordinates system followed by the Open Layers 3. Then the point is added as a feature to the map vector. The map vector is the place where all the features are stored and then appended onto the map as a heatmap.

Resources

Implementing Sponsors API in Open Event Frontend to Display Sponsors

This article will illustrate how the sponsors have been displayed on the public event page in Open Event Frontend using the Open-Event-Orga sponsors API. As we know that the project is an ember application so, it uses Ember data to consume the API. For fetching the sponsors, we would be mainly focusing on the following API endpoint:

GET /v1/events/{event_identifier}/sponsors

 

In the application we need to display the sponsors is the event’s public page which contains the event details, ticketing information, speaker details etc. along with the list of sponsors so, we will be only concerned with the public/index route in the application. As the sponsors details are nested within the events model so we need to first fetch the event and then from there we need to fetch the sponsors list from the model.

The model to fetch the event details looks like this:

model(params) {
return this.store.findRecord('event', params.event_id, { include: 'social-links' });
}

 

But we can easily observe that there is no parameter related to sponsor in the above model. The reason behind this is the fact that we want our sponsors to be displayed only on the event’s index route rather than displaying them on all the sub routes under public route. To display the sponsors on the public/index route our modal looks like this:

model() {
    const eventDetails = this._super(...arguments);
    return RSVP.hash({
      event   : eventDetails,
      sponsors: eventDetails.get('sponsors')
   });
}

 

As we can see in the above code that we have used this._super(…arguments) to fetch the event details from the event’s public route model which contains all the information related to the event thereby eliminating the need of another API call to fetch sponsors. Now using the ember’s get method we are fetching the sponsors from the eventDetails and putting it inside the sponsors JSON object for using it lately to display sponsors in public/index route.

Till now, we’ve fetched and stored the sponsors now our next task is to display the sponsors list on the event’s index page. The code for displaying the sponsors list on the index page is

{{public/sponsor-list sponsors=model.sponsors}} 

 

The sample user interface without  for displaying the sponsors looks like this:  

Fig. 1: The sample user interface for displaying the sponsors

After replacing the real time data with the sample one, the user interface (UI) for the sponsors looks like this.

Fig. 2: The user interface for sponsors with real time data

The entire code for implementing the sponsors API can be seen here.

To conclude, this is how we efficiently fetched the sponsors list using the Open-Event-Orga sponsors API, ensuring that there is no unnecessary API call to fetch the data.  

Resources:

Customizing Serializers in Open Event Front-end

Open Event Front-end project primarily uses Ember Data for API requests, which handles sending the request to correct endpoint, serializing and deserializing the request/response. The Open Event API project uses JSON API specs for implementation of the API, supported by Ember data.

While sending request we might want to customize the payload using a custom serializer. While implementing the Users API in the project, we faced a similiar problem. Let’s see how we solved it.

Creating a serializer for model

A serializer is created for a model, in this example we will create a user serializer for the user model. One important thing that we must keep in mind while creating a serializer is to use same name as that of model, so that ember can map the model with the serializer. We can create a serializer using ember-cli command:

ember g serializer user

 
Customizing serializer

In Open Event Front-end project every serializer extends the base serializer application.js which defines basic serialization like omitting readOnly attributes from the payload.

The user serializer provides more customization for the user model on top of application model. We override the serialize function, which lets us manipulate the payload of the request. We use `snapshot.id` to differentiate between a create request & an update request. If `snapshot.id` exists then it is an update request else it is a create request.

While manipulation user properties like email, contact etc we do not need to pass ‘password’ in the payload. We make use of ‘adapterOptions’ property associated with the ‘save()’ method. If the adapterOptions are associated and the ‘includePassword’ is set then we add ‘password’ attribute to the payload.

import ApplicationSerializer from 'open-event-frontend/serializers/application';
import { pick, omit } from 'lodash';

export default ApplicationSerializer.extend({
  serialize(snapshot, options) {
    const json = this._super(...arguments);
    if (snapshot.id) {
      let attributesToOmit = [];
      if (!snapshot.adapterOptions || !snapshot.adapterOptions.includePassword) {
        attributesToOmit.push('password');
      }
      json.data.attributes = omit(json.data.attributes, attributesToOmit);
    } else if (options && options.includeId) {
      json.data.attributes = pick(json.data.attributes, ['email', 'password']);
    }
    return json;
  }
});

If we want to add the password in the payload we can simply add ‘includePassword’ property to the ‘adapterOptions’ and pass it in the save method for operations like changing the password of the user.

user.save({
  adapterOptions: {
    includePassword: true
  }
})

Thank you for reading the blog, you can check the source code for the example here.
Resources

Learn more about how to customize serializers in ember data here

Adding Event Overview Route in Open Event Frontend

In Open Event Frontend we have an event overview route which is like a mini dashboard for an event where information regarding event sponsors, general info, roles, tickets, event setup etc. is present. All of the information is present in their corresponding components and this dashboard is made up of those components. To create this dashboard we will first create its components.

To create a component we will use following ember command-

ember -g component <component-name>

This command will give us three files: a template, a component and a test file corresponding to that component. We will use this command to generate all our components.

Now let’s discuss each component separately and see how many of them are combined to form this route-

The event-setup-checklist component contains semantic ui’s steps to maintain checklist of basic-details, sponsors, session & microlocation, call for speakers, session and speakers form customization so that it becomes easy to identify which step is complete and which is not.

Next is general-info component which shows basic information about an event like start-time, end-time, location, number of speakers, number of sponsors etc. It also shows whether the event is live or not.

In manage-roles component, manage the role for a given person, add people and assign different roles to them, edit roles for different people. Also we can see who are invited for a given role and who accepted them.

In event-sponsors component we manage the sponsors for the event, edit an existing sponsor, add a new sponsor with their logo, name, type and level. Also we can delete an existing sponsor.

Next is the ticket component which displays the details of number of orders, number of tickets sold, and total sales. Also it displays the number of types of tickets are sold.

Next is our app-component which has two choices. First is to generate android app for the event and second is to generate webapp of the event.

And finally in our view.index template, we add these components using ui stackable grid layout. Whenever we want to conditionally show or hide a component, we can do that in our event.index template and hence it becomes very easy to manage huge amounts content on a single page.

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