Open Event Server – Export Speakers as PDF File

FOSSASIA‘s Open Event Server is the REST API backend for the event management platform, Open Event. Here, the event organizers can create their events, add tickets for it and manage all aspects from the schedule to the speakers. Also, once he/she makes his event public, others can view it and buy tickets if interested.

The organizer can see all the speakers in a very detailed view in the event management dashboard. He can see the statuses of all the speakers. The possible statuses are pending, accepted, and rejected. He/she can take actions such as editing the speakers.

If the organizer wants to download the list of all the speakers as a PDF file, he or she can do it very easily by simply clicking on the Export As PDF button in the top right-hand corner.

Let us see how this is done on the server.

Server side – generating the Speakers PDF file

Here we will be using the pisa package which is used to convert from HTML to PDF. It is a html2pdf converter which uses ReportLab Toolkit, the HTML5lib and pyPdf. It supports HTML5 and CSS 2.1 (and some of CSS 3). It is completely written in pure Python so it is platform independent.

from xhtml2pdf import pisa<

We have a utility method create_save_pdf which creates and saves PDFs from HTML. It takes the following arguments:

  • pdf_data – This contains the HTML template which has to be converted to PDF.
  • key – This contains the file name
  • dir_path – This contains the directory

It returns the newly formed PDF file. The code is as follows:

def create_save_pdf(pdf_data, key, dir_path='/static/uploads/pdf/temp/'):
   filedir = current_app.config.get('BASE_DIR') + dir_path

   if not os.path.isdir(filedir):
       os.makedirs(filedir)

   filename = get_file_name() + '.pdf'
   dest = filedir + filename

   file = open(dest, "wb")
   pisa.CreatePDF(io.BytesIO(pdf_data.encode('utf-8')), file)
   file.close()

   uploaded_file = UploadedFile(dest, filename)
   upload_path = key.format(identifier=get_file_name())
   new_file = upload(uploaded_file, upload_path)
   # Removing old file created
   os.remove(dest)

   return new_file

The HTML file is formed using the render_template method of flask. This method takes the HTML template and its required variables as the arguments. In our case, we pass in ‘pdf/speakers_pdf.html’(template) and speakers. Here, speakers is the list of speakers to be included in the PDF file. In the template, we loop through each item of speakers. We print his name, email, list of its sessions, mobile, a short biography, organization, and position. All these fields form a row in the table. Hence, each speaker is a row in our PDF file.

The various columns are as follows:

<thead>
<tr>
   <th>
       {{ ("Name") }}
   </th>
   <th>
       {{ ("Email") }}
   </th>
   <th>
       {{ ("Sessions") }}
   </th>
   <th>
       {{ ("Mobile") }}
   </th>
   <th>
       {{ ("Short Biography") }}
   </th>
   <th>
       {{ ("Organisation") }}
   </th>
   <th>
       {{ ("Position") }}
   </th>
</tr>
</thead>

A snippet of the code which handles iterating over the speakers’ list and forming a row is as follows:

{% for speaker in speakers %}
   <tr class="padded" style="text-align:center; margin-top: 5px">
       <td>
           {% if speaker.name %}
               {{ speaker.name }}
           {% else %}
               {{ "-" }}
           {% endif %}
       </td>
       <td>
           {% if speaker.email %}
               {{ speaker.email }}
           {% else %}
               {{ "-" }}
           {% endif %}
       </td>
       <td>
           {% if speaker.sessions %}
               {% for session in speaker.sessions %}
                   {{ session.name }}<br>
               {% endfor %}
           {% else %}
               {{ "-" }}
           {% endif %}
       </td>
      …. So on
   </tr>
{% endfor %}

The full template can be found here.

Obtaining the Speakers PDF file:

Firstly, we have an API endpoint which starts the task on the server.

GET - /v1/events/{event_identifier}/export/speakers/pdf

Here, event_identifier is the unique ID of the event. This endpoint starts a celery task on the server to export the speakers of the event as a PDF file. It returns the URL of the task to get the status of the export task. A sample response is as follows:

{
  "task_url": "/v1/tasks/b7ca7088-876e-4c29-a0ee-b8029a64849a"
}

The user can go to the above-returned URL and check the status of his/her Celery task. If the task completed successfully he/she will get the download URL. The endpoint to check the status of the task is:

and the corresponding response from the server –

{
  "result": {
    "download_url": "/v1/events/1/exports/http://localhost/static/media/exports/1/zip/OGpMM0w2RH/event1.zip"
  },
  "state": "SUCCESS"
}

The file can be downloaded from the above-mentioned URL.

Resources

Open Event Frontend – Events Explore Page

This blog illustrates how the events explore page is implemented in the Open Event Frontend web app. The user can land on the events explore page by clicking on Browse Events button in the top panel on the home page, shown by the mouse tip in the following picture.

Here, the user can use the various filter options provided to search for the events as per his requirements, He/she can filter according to categories, sub-categories for each category, event type, and date range. A unique feature here is that the user can pick from the start date range options such as today, tomorrow, this week, this weekend, next week and many more. If neither of these fits his needs he can use custom dates as well. The user can also filter events using event location which is autocompleted using Google Maps API. Thus, searching for events is fast, easy and fun.

Let us see how this has been implemented.

Implementation

The explore routes has a method _loadEvents(params). Here, params is the various query parameters for filtering the events. This method forms the query, sends it to the server and returns the list of events returned by the server. The server uses Flask-REST-JSONAPI. It has a very flexible filtering system. It is completely related to the data layer used by the ResourceList manager. More information about this can be found here.

So, the filters are formed using syntax specified in the link mentioned above. We form an array filterOptions which stores the various filters. The default filter is that the event should be published:

let filterOptions = [
 {
   name : 'state',
   op  : 'eq',
   val  : 'published'
 }
];

Then we check for each filter option and check if it is present or not. If yes then we add it to filterOptions. An example as follows:

if (params.category) {
 filterOptions.push({
   name : 'event-topic',
   op  : 'has',
   val  : {
     name : 'name',
     op : 'eq',
     val : params.category
   }
 });
}

This is repeated for sub_category, event_type, location and start_date and end_date. An event is considered to fulfill the date filter if it satisfies any one of the given conditions:

  • If both start_date and end_date are mentioned:
    • Event start_date is after filter start date and before filter end date.
    • Or, event end date if after filter start date and before filter end date.
    • Or, event start date is before filter start date and event end date date is after filter end date.
  • If only start_date is mentioned, then if the event start date is after filter start date or event end date is after filter start date.

The code to this can be found here. For the date ranges mentioned above(today, tomorrow etc) the start dates and end dates are calculated using the moment.js library and then passed on as params.

The filteredEvents are passed in the route model.

async model(params) {
 return {
   eventTypes     : await this.store.findAll('event-type'),
   eventTopics    : await this.store.findAll('event-topic', { include: 'event-sub-topics' }),
   filteredEvents : await this._loadEvents(params)
 };
}

The variable is set in the controller and any change to the query params is observed for. The method _loadEvents is called whenever the query params change.

setupController(controller, model) {
 this._super(...arguments);
 controller.set('filteredEvents', model.filteredEvents);
 this.set('controller', controller);
},

actions: {
 async queryParamsDidChange(change, params) {
   if (this.get('controller')) {
     this.get('controller').set('filteredEvents', await this._loadEvents(params));
   }
 }
}

The template iterates over the filteredEvents and displays each one in a card.

Resources

Open Event Server – Export Sessions as PDF File

FOSSASIA‘s Open Event Server is the REST API backend for the event management platform, Open Event. Here, the event organizers can create their events, add tickets for it and manage all aspects from the schedule to the speakers. Also, once he/she makes his event public, others can view it and buy tickets if interested.

The organizer can see all the sessions in a very detailed view in the event management dashboard. He can see the statuses of all the sessions. The possible statuses are pending, accepted, confirmed and rejected. He/she can take actions such as accepting/rejecting the sessions.

If the organizer wants to download the list of all the sessions as a PDF file, he or she can do it very easily by simply clicking on the Export As PDF button in the top right-hand corner.

Let us see how this is done on the server.

Server side – generating the Sessions PDF file

Here we will be using the pisa package which is used to convert from HTML to PDF. It is a html2pdf converter which uses ReportLab Toolkit, the HTML5lib and pyPdf. It supports HTML5 and CSS 2.1 (and some of CSS 3). It is completely written in pure Python so it is platform independent.

from xhtml2pdf import pisa

We have a utility method create_save_pdf which creates and saves PDFs from HTML. It takes the following arguments:

  • pdf_data – This contains the HTML template which has to be converted to PDF.
  • key – This contains the file name
  • dir_path – This contains the directory

It returns the newly formed PDF file. The code is as follows:

def create_save_pdf(pdf_data, key, dir_path='/static/uploads/pdf/temp/'):
   filedir = current_app.config.get('BASE_DIR') + dir_path

   if not os.path.isdir(filedir):
       os.makedirs(filedir)

   filename = get_file_name() + '.pdf'
   dest = filedir + filename

   file = open(dest, "wb")
   pisa.CreatePDF(io.BytesIO(pdf_data.encode('utf-8')), file)
   file.close()

   uploaded_file = UploadedFile(dest, filename)
   upload_path = key.format(identifier=get_file_name())
   new_file = upload(uploaded_file, upload_path)
   # Removing old file created
   os.remove(dest)

   return new_file

The HTML file is formed using the render_template method of flask. This method takes the HTML template and its required variables as the arguments. In our case, we pass in ‘pdf/sessions_pdf.html’(template) and sessions. Here, sessions is the list of sessions to be included in the PDF file. In the template, we loop through each item of sessions and check if it is deleted or not. If it not deleted then we print its title, state, list of its speakers, track, created at and has an email been sent or not. All these fields form a row in the table. Hence, each session is a row in our PDF file.

The various columns are as follows:

<thead>
<tr>
   <th>
       {{ ("Title") }}
   </th>
   <th>
       {{ ("State") }}
   </th>
   <th>
       {{ ("Speakers") }}
   </th>
   <th>
       {{ ("Track") }}
   </th>
   <th>
       {{ ("Created At") }}
   </th>
   <th>
       {{ ("Email Sent") }}
   </th>
</tr>
</thead>

A snippet of the code which handles iterating over the sessions list and forming a row is as follows:

{% for session in sessions %}
   {% if not session.deleted_at %}
       <tr class="padded" style="text-align:center; margin-top: 5px">
           <td>
               {% if session.title %}
                   {{ session.title }}
               {% else %}
                   {{ "-" }}
               {% endif %}
           </td>
           <td>
               {% if session.state %}
                   {{ session.state }}
               {% else %}
                   {{ "-" }}
               {% endif %}
           </td>
           <td>
               {% if session.speakers %}
                   {% for speaker in session.speakers %}
                       {{ speaker.name }}<br>
                   {% endfor %}
               {% else %}
                   {{ "-" }}
               {% endif %}
           </td>
          ….. And so on
       </tr>
   {% endif %}
{% endfor %}

The full template can be found here.

Obtaining the Sessions PDF file:

Firstly, we have an API endpoint which starts the task on the server.

GET - /v1/events/{event_identifier}/export/sessions/pdf

Here, event_identifier is the unique ID of the event. This endpoint starts a celery task on the server to export the sessions of the event as a PDF file. It returns the URL of the task to get the status of the export task. A sample response is as follows:

{
  "task_url": "/v1/tasks/b7ca7088-876e-4c29-a0ee-b8029a64849a"
}

The user can go to the above-returned URL and check the status of his/her Celery task. If the task completed successfully he/she will get the download URL. The endpoint to check the status of the task is:

and the corresponding response from the server –

{
  "result": {
    "download_url": "/v1/events/1/exports/http://localhost/static/media/exports/1/zip/OGpMM0w2RH/event1.zip"
  },
  "state": "SUCCESS"
}

The file can be downloaded from the above-mentioned URL.

Resources

Open Event Frontend – Settings Service

This blog illustrates how the settings of a particular user are obtained in the Open Event Frontend web app. To access the settings of the user a service has been created which fetches the settings from the endpoint provided by Open Event Server.

Let’s see why a special service was created for this.

Problem

In the first step of the event creation wizard, the user has the option to link Paypal or Stripe to accept payments. The option to accept payment through Paypal or Stripe was shown to the user without checking if it was enabled by the admin in his settings. To solve this problem, we needed to access the settings of the admin and check for the required conditions. But since queryRecord() returned a promise we had to re-render the page for the effect to show which resulted in this code:

canAcceptPayPal: computed('data.event.paymentCurrency', function() {     this.get('store').queryRecord('setting', {}) .then(setting => { this.set('canAcceptPayPal', (setting.paypalSandboxUsername || setting.paypalLiveUsername) && find(paymentCurrencies, ['code', this.get('data.event.paymentCurrency')]).paypal); this.rerender(); });

This code was setting a computed property inside it and then re-rendering which is bad programming and can result in weird bugs.

Solution

The above problem was solved by creating a service for settings. This made sense as settings would be required at other places as well. The file was called settings.js and was placed in the services folder. Let me walk you through its code.

  • Extend the default Service provided by Ember.js and initialize store, session, authManager and _lastPromise.
import Service, { inject as service } from '@ember/service';
import { observer } from '@ember/object';

export default Service.extend({

 store       : service(),
 session     : service(),
 authManager : service(),

_lastPromise: Promise.resolve(),
  • The main method which fetches results from the server is called _loadSettings(). It is an async method. It queries setting from the server and then iterates through every attribute of the setting model and stores the corresponding value from the fetched result.
/**
* Load the settings from the API and set the attributes as properties on the service
*
* @return {Promise<void>}
* @private
*/
async _loadSettings() {
 const settingsModel = await this.get('store').queryRecord('setting', {});
 this.get('store').modelFor('setting').eachAttribute(attributeName => {
   this.set(attributeName, settingsModel.get(attributeName));
 });
},
  • The initialization of the settings service is handled by initialize(). This method returns a promise.
/**
* Initialize the settings service
* @return {*|Promise<void>}
*/
initialize() {
 const promise = this._loadSettings();
 this.set('_lastPromise', promise);
 return promise;
}
  • _authenticationObserver observes for changes in authentication changes and reloads the settings as required.
/**
* Reload settings when the authentication state changes.
*/
_authenticationObserver: observer('session.isAuthenticated', function() {
 this.get('_lastPromise')
   .then(() => this.set('_lastPromise', this._loadSettings()))
   .catch(() => this.set('_lastPromise', this._loadSettings()));
}),

The service we created can be directly used in the app to fetch the settings for the user. To solve the Paypal and Stripe payment problem described above, we use it as follows:

canAcceptPayPal: computed('data.event.paymentCurrency', 'settings.paypalSandboxUsername', 'settings.paypalLiveUsername', function() {
 return (this.get('settings.paypalSandboxUsername') || this.get('settings.paypalLiveUsername')) && find(paymentCurrencies, ['code', this.get('data.event.paymentCurrency')]).paypal;
}),

canAcceptStripe: computed('data.event.paymentCurrency', 'settings.stripeClientId', function() {
 return this.get('settings.stripeClientId') && find(paymentCurrencies, ['code', this.get('data.event.paymentCurrency')]).stripe;
}),

Thus, there is no need to re-render the page and dangerously set the property inside its computed method.

References

Open Event Server – Export Speakers as CSV File

FOSSASIA‘s Open Event Server is the REST API backend for the event management platform, Open Event. Here, the event organizers can create their events, add tickets for it and manage all aspects from the schedule to the speakers. Also, once he/she makes his event public, others can view it and buy tickets if interested.

The organizer can see all the speakers in a very detailed view in the event management dashboard. He can see the statuses of all the speakers. The possible statuses are pending, accepted and rejected. He/she can take actions such as editing/viewing speakers.

If the organizer wants to download the list of all the speakers as a CSV file, he or she can do it very easily by simply clicking on the Export As CSV button in the top right-hand corner.

Let us see how this is done on the server.

Server side – generating the Speakers CSV file

Here we will be using the csv package provided by python for writing the csv file.

import csv
  • We define a method export_speakers_csv which takes the speakers to be exported as a CSV file as the argument.
  • Next, we define the headers of the CSV file. It is the first row of the CSV file.
def export_speakers_csv(speakers):
   headers = ['Speaker Name', 'Speaker Email', 'Speaker Session(s)',
              'Speaker Mobile', 'Speaker Bio', 'Speaker Organisation', 'Speaker Position']
  • A list is defined called rows. This contains the rows of the CSV file. As mentioned earlier, headers is the first row.
rows = [headers]
  • We iterate over each speaker in speakers and form a row for that speaker by separating the values of each of the columns by a comma. Here, every row is one speaker.
  • As a speaker can contain multiple sessions we iterate over each session for that particular speaker and append each session to a string. ‘;’ is used as a delimiter. This string is then added to the row. We also include the state of the session – accepted, rejected, confirmed.
  • The newly formed row is added to the rows list.
for speaker in speakers:
   column = [speaker.name if speaker.name else '', speaker.email if speaker.email else '']
   if speaker.sessions:
       session_details = ''
       for session in speaker.sessions:
           if not session.deleted_at:
               session_details += session.title + ' (' + session.state + '); '
       column.append(session_details[:-2])
   else:
       column.append('')
   column.append(speaker.mobile if speaker.mobile else '')
   column.append(speaker.short_biography if speaker.short_biography else '')
   column.append(speaker.organisation if speaker.organisation else '')
   column.append(speaker.position if speaker.position else '')
   rows.append(column)
  • rows contains the contents of the CSV file and hence it is returned.
return rows
  • We iterate over each item of rows and write it to the CSV file using the methods provided by the csv package.
with open(file_path, "w") as temp_file:
   writer = csv.writer(temp_file)
   from app.api.helpers.csv_jobs_util import export_speakers_csv
   content = export_speakers_csv(speakers)
   for row in content:
       writer.writerow(row)

Obtaining the Speakers CSV file:

Firstly, we have an API endpoint which starts the task on the server.

GET - /v1/events/{event_identifier}/export/speakers/csv

Here, event_identifier is the unique ID of the event. This endpoint starts a celery task on the server to export the speakers of the event as a CSV file. It returns the URL of the task to get the status of the export task. A sample response is as follows:

{
  "task_url": "/v1/tasks/b7ca7088-876e-4c29-a0ee-b8029a64849a"
}

The user can go to the above-returned URL and check the status of his/her Celery task. If the task completed successfully he/she will get the download URL. The endpoint to check the status of the task is:

and the corresponding response from the server –

{
  "result": {
    "download_url": "/v1/events/1/exports/http://localhost/static/media/exports/1/zip/OGpMM0w2RH/event1.zip"
  },
  "state": "SUCCESS"
}

The file can be downloaded from the above-mentioned URL.

Resources

Open Event Server – Export Sessions as CSV File

FOSSASIA‘s Open Event Server is the REST API backend for the event management platform, Open Event. Here, the event organizers can create their events, add tickets for it and manage all aspects from the schedule to the speakers. Also, once he/she makes his event public, others can view it and buy tickets if interested.

The organizer can see all the sessions in a very detailed view in the event management dashboard. He can see the statuses of all the sessions. The possible statuses are pending, accepted, confirmed and rejected. He/she can take actions such as accepting/rejecting the sessions.

If the organizer wants to download the list of all the sessions as a CSV file, he or she can do it very easily by simply clicking on the Export As CSV button in the top right-hand corner.

Let us see how this is done on the server.

Server side – generating the Sessions CSV file

Here we will be using the csv package provided by python for writing the csv file.

import csv
  • We define a method export_sessions_csv which takes the sessions to be exported as a CSV file as the argument.
  • Next, we define the headers of the CSV file. It is the first row of the CSV file.
def export_sessions_csv(sessions):
   headers = ['Session Title', 'Session Speakers',
              'Session Track', 'Session Abstract', 'Created At', 'Email Sent']
  • A list is defined called rows. This contains the rows of the CSV file. As mentioned earlier, headers is the first row.
rows = [headers]
  • We iterate over each session in sessions and form a row for that session by separating the values of each of the columns by a comma. Here, every row is one session.
  • As a session can contain multiple speakers we iterate over each speaker for that particular session and append each speaker to a string. ‘;’ is used as a delimiter. This string is then added to the row.
  • The newly formed row is added to the rows list.
for session in sessions:
   if not session.deleted_at:
       column = [session.title + ' (' + session.state + ')' if session.title else '']
       if session.speakers:
           in_session = ''
           for speaker in session.speakers:
               if speaker.name:
                   in_session += (speaker.name + '; ')
           column.append(in_session[:-2])
       else:
           column.append('')
       column.append(session.track.name if session.track and session.track.name else '')
       column.append(strip_tags(session.short_abstract) if session.short_abstract else '')
       column.append(session.created_at if session.created_at else '')
       column.append('Yes' if session.is_mail_sent else 'No')
       rows.append(column)
  • rows contains the contents of the CSV file and hence it is returned.
return rows
  • We iterate over each item of rows and write it to the CSV file using the methods provided by the csv package.
writer = csv.writer(temp_file)
from app.api.helpers.csv_jobs_util import export_sessions_csv
content = export_sessions_csv(sessions)
for row in content:
   writer.writerow(row)

Obtaining the Sessions CSV file:

Firstly, we have an API endpoint which starts the task on the server.

GET - /v1/events/{event_identifier}/export/sessions/csv

Here, event_identifier is the unique ID of the event. This endpoint starts a celery task on the server to export the sessions of the event as a CSV file. It returns the URL of the task to get the status of the export task. A sample response is as follows:

{
  "task_url": "/v1/tasks/b7ca7088-876e-4c29-a0ee-b8029a64849a"
}

The user can go to the above-returned URL and check the status of his/her Celery task. If the task completed successfully he/she will get the download URL. The endpoint to check the status of the task is:

and the corresponding response from the server –

{
  "result": {
    "download_url": "/v1/events/1/exports/http://localhost/static/media/exports/1/zip/OGpMM0w2RH/event1.zip"
  },
  "state": "SUCCESS"
}

The file can be downloaded from the above-mentioned URL.

Resources

Open Event Server – Export Attendees as CSV File

FOSSASIA‘s Open Event Server is the REST API backend for the event management platform, Open Event. Here, the event organizers can create their events, add tickets for it and manage all aspects from the schedule to the speakers. Also, once he/she makes his event public, others can view it and buy tickets if interested.

The organizer can see all the attendees in a very detailed view in the event management dashboard. He can see the statuses of all the attendees. The possible statuses are completed, placed, pending, expired and canceled, checked in and not checked in. He/she can take actions such as checking in the attendee.

If the organizer wants to download the list of all the attendees as a CSV file, he or she can do it very easily by simply clicking on the Export As and then on CSV.

Let us see how this is done on the server.

Server side – generating the Attendees CSV file

Here we will be using the csv package provided by python for writing the csv file.

import csv
  • We define a method export_attendees_csv which takes the attendees to be exported as a CSV file as the argument.
  • Next, we define the headers of the CSV file. It is the first row of the CSV file.
def export_attendees_csv(attendees):
   headers = ['Order#', 'Order Date', 'Status', 'First Name', 'Last Name', 'Email',
              'Country', 'Payment Type', 'Ticket Name', 'Ticket Price', 'Ticket Type']
  • A list is defined called rows. This contains the rows of the CSV file. As mentioned earlier, headers is the first row.
rows = [headers]
  • We iterate over each attendee in attendees and form a row for that attendee by separating the values of each of the columns by a comma. Here, every row is one attendee.
  • The newly formed row is added to the rows list.
for attendee in attendees:
   column = [str(attendee.order.get_invoice_number()) if attendee.order else '-',
             str(attendee.order.created_at) if attendee.order and attendee.order.created_at else '-',
             str(attendee.order.status) if attendee.order and attendee.order.status else '-',
             str(attendee.firstname) if attendee.firstname else '',
             str(attendee.lastname) if attendee.lastname else '',
             str(attendee.email) if attendee.email else '',
             str(attendee.country) if attendee.country else '',
             str(attendee.order.payment_mode) if attendee.order and attendee.order.payment_mode else '',
             str(attendee.ticket.name) if attendee.ticket and attendee.ticket.name else '',
             str(attendee.ticket.price) if attendee.ticket and attendee.ticket.price else '0',
             str(attendee.ticket.type) if attendee.ticket and attendee.ticket.type else '']

   rows.append(column)
  • rows contains the contents of the CSV file and hence it is returned.
return rows
  • We iterate over each item of rows and write it to the CSV file using the methods provided by the csv package.
writer = csv.writer(temp_file)
from app.api.helpers.csv_jobs_util import export_attendees_csv
content = export_attendees_csv(attendees)
for row in content:
   writer.writerow(row)

Obtaining the Attendees CSV file:

Firstly, we have an API endpoint which starts the task on the server.

GET - /v1/events/{event_identifier}/export/attendees/csv

Here, event_identifier is the unique ID of the event. This endpoint starts a celery task on the server to export the attendees of the event as a CSV file. It returns the URL of the task to get the status of the export task. A sample response is as follows:

{
  "task_url": "/v1/tasks/b7ca7088-876e-4c29-a0ee-b8029a64849a"
}

The user can go to the above-returned URL and check the status of his/her Celery task. If the task completed successfully he/she will get the download URL. The endpoint to check the status of the task is:

and the corresponding response from the server –

{
  "result": {
    "download_url": "/v1/events/1/exports/http://localhost/static/media/exports/1/zip/OGpMM0w2RH/event1.zip"
  },
  "state": "SUCCESS"
}

The file can be downloaded from the above-mentioned URL.

References

Open Event Server – Export Orders as CSV File

FOSSASIA‘s Open Event Server is the REST API backend for the event management platform, Open Event. Here, the event organizers can create their events, add tickets for it and manage all aspects from the schedule to the speakers. Also, once he/she makes his event public, others can view it and buy tickets if interested.

The organizer can see all the orders in a very detailed view in the event management dashboard. He can see the statuses of all the orders. The possible statuses are completed, placed, pending, expired and canceled.

If the organizer wants to download the list of all the orders as a CSV file, he or she can do it very easily by simply clicking on the Export As and then on CSV.

Let us see how this is done on the server.

Server side – generating the Orders CSV file

Here we will be using the csv package provided by python for writing the csv file.

import csv
  • We define a method export_orders_csv which takes the orders to be exported as a CSV file as the argument.
  • Next, we define the headers of the CSV file. It is the first row of the CSV file.
def export_orders_csv(orders):
   headers = ['Order#', 'Order Date', 'Status', 'Payment Type', 'Total Amount', 'Quantity',
              'Discount Code', 'First Name', 'Last Name', 'Email']
  • A list is defined called rows. This contains the rows of the CSV file. As mentioned earlier, headers is the first row.
rows = [headers]
  • We iterate over each order in orders and form a row for that order by separating the values of each of the columns by a comma. Here, every row is one order.
  • The newly formed row is added to the rows list.
for order in orders:
   if order.status != "deleted":
       column = [str(order.get_invoice_number()), str(order.created_at) if order.created_at else '',
                 str(order.status) if order.status else '', str(order.paid_via) if order.paid_via else '',
                 str(order.amount) if order.amount else '', str(order.get_tickets_count()),
                 str(order.discount_code.code) if order.discount_code else '',
                 str(order.user.first_name)
                 if order.user and order.user.first_name else '',
                 str(order.user.last_name)
                 if order.user and order.user.last_name else '',
                 str(order.user.email) if order.user and order.user.email else '']
       rows.append(column)
  • rows contains the contents of the CSV file and hence it is returned.
return rows
  • We iterate over each item of rows and write it to the CSV file using the methods provided by the csv package.
writer = csv.writer(temp_file)
from app.api.helpers.csv_jobs_util import export_orders_csv
content = export_orders_csv(orders)
for row in content:
   writer.writerow(row)

Obtaining the Orders CSV file:

Firstly, we have an API endpoint which starts the task on the server.

GET - /v1/events/{event_identifier}/export/orders/csv

Here, event_identifier is the unique ID of the event. This endpoint starts a celery task on the server to export the orders of the event as a CSV file. It returns the URL of the task to get the status of the export task. A sample response is as follows:

{
  "task_url": "/v1/tasks/b7ca7088-876e-4c29-a0ee-b8029a64849a"
}</span

The user can go to the above-returned URL and check the status of his/her Celery task. If the task completed successfully he/she will get the download URL. The endpoint to check the status of the task is:

and the corresponding response from the server –

{
  "result": {
    "download_url": "/v1/events/1/exports/http://localhost/static/media/exports/1/zip/OGpMM0w2RH/event1.zip"
  },
  "state": "SUCCESS"
}

The file can be downloaded from the aabove-mentionedURL.

References

Open Event Server – Export Event as a Pentabarf XML File

FOSSASIA‘s Open Event Server is the REST API backend for the event management platform, Open Event. Here, the event organizers can create their events, add tickets for it and manage all aspects from the schedule to the speakers. Also, once he makes his event public, others can view it and buy tickets if interested.

To make event promotion easier, we also provide the event organizer to export his event as a Pentabarf XML file. Pentabarf XML is used to store events/conferences in a format which most of the scheduling applications can read and add that particular event/conference to the user’s schedule.

Server side – generating the Pentabarf XML file

Here we will be using the pentabarf package for Python for parsing and creating the file.

from pentabarf.Conference import Conference
from pentabarf.Day import Day
from pentabarf.Event import Event
from pentabarf.Person import Person
from pentabarf.Room import Room
  • We define a class PentabarfExporter which has a static method export(event_id).
  • Query the event using the event_id passed and start forming the event in the required format:
event = EventModel.query.get(event_id)
diff = (event.ends_at - event.starts_at)

conference = Conference(title=event.name, start=event.starts_at, end=event.ends_at,
                       days=diff.days if diff.days > 0 else 1,
                       day_change="00:00", timeslot_duration="00:15",
                       venue=event.location_name)
dates = (db.session.query(cast(Session.starts_at, DATE))
        .filter_by(event_id=event_id)
        .filter_by(state='accepted')
        .filter(Session.deleted_at.is_(None))
        .order_by(asc(Session.starts_at)).distinct().all())
  • We have queried for the dates of the event and saved it in dates.
  • We will now iterate over each date and query the microlocations who have a session on that particular date.
for date in dates:
   date = date[0]
   day = Day(date=date)
   microlocation_ids = list(db.session.query(Session.microlocation_id)
                            .filter(func.date(Session.starts_at) == date)
                            .filter_by(state='accepted')
                            .filter(Session.deleted_at.is_(None))
                            .order_by(asc(Session.microlocation_id)).distinct())
  • For each microlocation thus obtained, we will query for accepted sessions to be held at those microlocations.
  • We will also initialize a Room for each microlocation.
for microlocation_id in microlocation_ids:
   microlocation_id = microlocation_id[0]
   microlocation = Microlocation.query.get(microlocation_id)
   sessions = Session.query.filter_by(microlocation_id=microlocation_id) \
       .filter(func.date(Session.starts_at) == date) \
       .filter_by(state='accepted') \
       .filter(Session.deleted_at.is_(None)) \
       .order_by(asc(Session.starts_at)).all()

   room = Room(name=microlocation.name)
  • We will now iterate over the aabove-obtained sessions and instantiate an Event for each session.
  • Then we will iterate over all the speakers of that session and instantiate a Person for each speaker.
  • Finally, we will add that Event to the Room we created earlier.
for session in sessions:

   session_event = Event(id=session.id,
                         date=session.starts_at,
                         start=session.starts_at,
                         duration=str(session.ends_at - session.starts_at) + "00:00",
                         track=session.track.name,
                         abstract=session.short_abstract,
                         title=session.title,
                         type='Talk',
                         description=session.long_abstract,
                         conf_url=url_for('event_detail.display_event_detail_home',
                                          identifier=event.identifier),
                         full_conf_url=url_for('event_detail.display_event_detail_home',
                                               identifier=event.identifier, _external=True),
                         released="True" if event.schedule_published_on else "False")

   for speaker in session.speakers:
       person = Person(id=speaker.id, name=speaker.name)
       session_event.add_person(person)

   room.add_event(session_event)
  • Then we will add the room to the day and then add each day to the conference.
day.add_room(room)
conference.add_day(day)
  • Finally, we will call the generate method of the conference to generate the XML file. This can be directly written to the file.
return conference.generate("Generated by " + get_settings()['app_name'])

Obtaining the Pentabarf XML file:

Firstly, we have an API endpoint which starts the task on the server.

GET - /v1/events/{event_identifier}/export/pentabarf

Here, event_identifier is the unique ID of the event. This endpoint starts a celery task on the server to export the event as a Pentabarf XML file. It returns the task of the URL to get the status of the export task. A sample response is as follows:

{
  "task_url": "/v1/tasks/b7ca7088-876e-4c29-a0ee-b8029a64849a"
}

The user can go to the above-returned URL and check the status of his Celery task. If the task completed successfully he will get the download URL. The endpoint to check the status of the task is:

and the corresponding response from the server –

{
  "result": {
    "download_url": "/v1/events/1/exports/http://localhost/static/media/exports/1/zip/OGpMM0w2RH/event1.zip"
  },
  "state": "SUCCESS"
}

The file can be downloaded from the above-mentioned URL.

Hence, now the event can be added to any scheduling app which recognizes the Pentabarf XML format.

References

Open Event Server – Export Event as xCalendar File

FOSSASIA‘s Open Event Server is the REST API backend for the event management platform, Open Event. Here, the event organizers can create their events, add tickets for it and manage all aspects from the schedule to the speakers. Also, once he makes his event public, others can view it and buy tickets if interested.

To make event promotion easier, we also provide the event organizer to export his event as an xCalendar file. xCal is an XML representation of the iCalendar standard. xCal is not an alternative nor next generation of iCalendar. xCal represents iCalendar components, properties, and parameters as defined in iCalendar. This format was selected to ease its translation back to the iCalendar format using an XSLT transform.

Server side – generating the xCal file

Here we will be using the xml.etree.ElementTree package for Python for parsing and creating XML data.

from xml.etree.ElementTree import Element, SubElement, tostring
  • We define a class XCalExporter which has a static method export(event_id).
  • Query the event using the event_id passed and start forming the calendar:
event = Event.query.get(event_id)

tz = event.timezone or 'UTC'
tz = pytz.timezone(tz)

i_calendar_node = Element('iCalendar')
i_calendar_node.set('xmlns:xCal', 'urn:ietf:params:xml:ns:xcal')
v_calendar_node = SubElement(i_calendar_node, 'vcalendar')
version_node = SubElement(v_calendar_node, 'version')
version_node.text = '2.0'
prod_id_node = SubElement(v_calendar_node, 'prodid')
prod_id_node.text = '-//fossasia//open-event//EN'
cal_desc_node = SubElement(v_calendar_node, 'x-wr-caldesc')
cal_desc_node.text = "Schedule for sessions at " + event.name
cal_name_node = SubElement(v_calendar_node, 'x-wr-calname')
cal_name_node.text = event.name
  • We query for the accepted sessions of the event and store it in sessions
sessions = Session.query \
   .filter_by(event_id=event_id) \
   .filter_by(state='accepted') \
   .filter(Session.deleted_at.is_(None)) \
   .order_by(asc(Session.starts_at)).all()
  • We then iterate through all the sessions in sessions.
  • If it is a valid session, we instantiate a SubElement and store required details
v_event_node = SubElement(v_calendar_node, 'vevent')

method_node = SubElement(v_event_node, 'method')
method_node.text = 'PUBLISH'

uid_node = SubElement(v_event_node, 'uid')
uid_node.text = str(session.id) + "-" + event.identifier

dtstart_node = SubElement(v_event_node, 'dtstart')
dtstart_node.text = tz.localize(session.starts_at).isoformat()

…. So on
  • We then loop through all the speakers in that particular session and add it to the xCal calendar node object as well.
for speaker in session.speakers:
   attendee_node = SubElement(v_event_node, 'attendee')
   attendee_node.text = speaker.name
  • And finally, the string of the calendar node is returned. This is the xCalendar file contents. This can be directly written to a file.
return tostring(i_calendar_node)

Obtaining the xCal file:

Firstly, we have an API endpoint which starts the task on the server.

GET - /v1/events/{event_identifier}/export/xcal

Here, event_identifier is the unique ID of the event. This endpoint starts a celery task on the server to export the event as an xCal file. It returns the URL of the task to get the status of the export task. A sample response is as follows:

{
  "task_url": "/v1/tasks/b7ca7088-876e-4c29-a0ee-b8029a64849a"
}

The user can go to the above-returned URL and check the status of his Celery task. If the task completed successfully he will get the download URL. The endpoint to check the status of the task is:

and the corresponding response from the server –

{
  "result": {
    "download_url": "/v1/events/1/exports/http://localhost/static/media/exports/1/zip/OGpMM0w2RH/event1.zip"
  },
  "state": "SUCCESS"
}

The file can be downloaded from the above mentioned URL.

Hence, now the event can be added to any scheduling app which recognizes the xcs format.

References