Implementing Email Notifications in Open Event Frontend

In Open Event Frontend, we have a ‘settings/email-preferences’ route where we give the user an access to change the email-notifications that he wants to subscribe for a specific event. For now, we are having three notifications for an event which the user can toggle to on and off. To achieve this, we did the following things:

First, we create a model for email-notifications so as to have a skeleton of the data that we are going to receive from the JSON API.

export default ModelBase.extend({

  /**
   * Attributes
   */

  nextEvent           : attr('boolean'),
  newPaper            : attr('boolean'),
  sessionAcceptReject : attr('boolean'),
  sessionSchedule     : attr('boolean'),
  afterTicketPurchase : attr('boolean'),

  /**
   * Relationships
   */
  user  : belongsTo('user'),
  event : belongsTo('event')
});

Thus, above code shows the attributes which we are going to receive via our JSON API and we will render the data accordingly on the page. We have established the relationship of the email-notifications with user and event so that in future wherever needed, we can query the records from either side. The client side has checkboxes to show the data to the user. Following is the format of the checkboxes:

<div class="row">
        <div class="column eight wide">
          {{t 'New Paper is Submitted to your Event'}}
        </div>
        <div class="ui column eight wide right aligned">
          {{ui-checkbox class='toggle' checked=preference.newPaper onChange=(pipe-action (action (mut preference.newPaper)) (action 'savePreference' preference))}}
        </div>
      </div>
      <div class="row">
        <div class="column eight wide">
          {{t 'Change in Schedule of Sessions in your Event'}}
        </div>
        <div class="ui column eight wide right aligned">
          {{ui-checkbox class='toggle' checked=preference.sessionSchedule onChange=(pipe-action (action (mut preference.sessionSchedule)) (action 'savePreference' preference))}}
        </div>
      </div>

The states of the checkboxes are determined by the data that we receive from the API. For example, if for a record, the API returns:

nextEvent           : true,
newPaper            : false,
sessionAcceptReject : true,
sessionSchedule     : false,
afterTicketPurchase : false,

Then, the respective states will be shown by the checkbox and the user can toggle the states to change the email-preferences as they want.

Thus to get the data sent by the server to the client, we return it as a model and query it as:

model() {
    return this.get('authManager.currentUser').query('emailNotifications', { include: 'event' });
}

As we can see, as mentioned earlier, we kept the relationships so that we can query the email-notifications specific to the particular user or specific to particular event. Here, we are showing a user’s email-notifications and hence we queried it with the user relationship.
The authManager loads the currentUser and queries the email-notifications for a particular use. We also want the event details to show the email-preferences, hence we include the event model to be fetched in the query also.

We also let the user change the preferences of the email-notifications so that he can customise the notifications and keep the ones he wants to receive. We implement the updating of email-preferences API as follows:

Whenever a user toggles the checkbox, we are having an action as called ‘savePreference’, which handles the updation of the preferences.

 

{{ui-checkbox class='toggle' checked=preference.newPaper onChange=(pipe-action (action (mut preference.newPaper)) (action 'savePreference' preference))}}

savePreference(emailPreference) {
      emailPreference.save()
        .then(() => {
          this.get('notify').success(this.l10n.t('Email notifications updated successfully'));
        })
        .catch(() => {
          emailPreference.rollbackAttributes();
          this.get('notify').error(this.l10n.t('An unexpected error occurred.'));
        });
    }

We are passing the parameter(the whole preference object to the action), and then just performing a ‘save’ method on it which will send a PATCH request to the server to update the data.

Thus, in this way, the user can change the email-notification preferences in the Open Event Frontend.

Resources:
Ember data Official guide
Blog on Models and Ember data by Daniel Lavigne: Learning Ember.js Part 4: Models

Source code: https://github.com/fossasia/open-event-frontend/pull/537/files

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Handling Requests for hasMany Relationships in Open Event Front-end

In Open Event Front-end we use Ember Data and JSON API specs to integrate the application with the server. Ember Data provides an easy way to handle API requests, however it does not support a direct POST for saving bulk data which was the problem we faced while implementing event creation using the API.

In this blog we will take a look at how we implemented POST requests for saving hasMany relationships, using an example of sessions-speakers route to see how we saved the tracks, microlocations & session-types. Lets see how we did it.

Fetching the data from the server

Ember by default does not support hasMany requests for getting related model data. However we can use external add on which enable the hasMany Get requests, we use ember-data-has-many-query which is a great add on for querying hasMany relations of a model.

let data = this.modelFor('events.view.edit');
data.tracks = data.event.get('tracks');
data.microlocations = data.event.get('microlocations');
data.sessionTypes = data.event.get('sessionTypes');
return RSVP.hash(data);

In the above example we are querying the tracks, microlocations & sessionTypes which are hasMany relationships, related to the events model. We can simply do a to do a GET request for the related model.

data.event.get('tracks');

In the above example we are retrieving the all the tracks of the event.

Sending a POST request for hasMany relationship
Ember currently does not saving bulk data POST requests for hasMany relations. We solved this by doing a POST request for individual data of the hasMany array.

We start with creating a `promises` array which contains all the individual requests. We then iterate over all the hasMany relations & push it to the `promises` array. Now each request is an individual promise.

let promises = [];

promises.push(this.get('model.event.tracks').toArray().map(track => track.save()));
promises.push(this.get('model.event.sessionTypes').toArray().map(type => type.save()));
promises.push(this.get('model.event.microlocations').toArray().map(location => location.save()));

Once we have all the promises we then use RSVP to make the POST requests. We make use of all() method which takes an array of promises as parameter and resolves all the promises. If the promises are not resolved successfully then we simply notify the user using the notify service, else we redirect to the home page.

RSVP.Promise.all(promises)
  .then(() => {
    this.transitionToRoute('index');
  }, function() {
    this.get('notify').error(this.l10n.t(Data did not save. Please try again'));
  });

The result of this we can now retrieve & create new tracks, microlocations & sessionTypes on sessions-speakers route.

Thank you for reading the blog, you can check the source code for the example here.

Resources

 

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Implementing User Permissions API on Open Event Frontend to View and Update User Permission Settings

This blog article will illustrate how the user permissions  are displayed and updated on the admin permissions page in Open Event Frontend, using the user permissions API. Our discussion primarily will involve the admin/permissions/index route to illustrate the process.

The primary end point of Open Event API with which we are concerned with for fetching the permissions  for a user is

GET /v1/user-permissions

First we need to create a model for the user-permissions, which will have the fields corresponding to the api, so we proceed with the ember CLI command:

ember g model user-permission

Next we define the model according to the requirements. The model needs to extend the base model class, and other than the name and description all the fields will be boolean since the user permissions frontend primarily consists of checkboxes to grant and revoke permissions. Hence the model will be of the following format.

import attr from 'ember-data/attr';
import ModelBase from 'open-event-frontend/models/base';

export default ModelBase.extend({
 name           : attr('string'),
 description    : attr('string'),
 unverifiedUser : attr('boolean'),
 anonymousUser  : attr('boolean')
});

Now we need to load the data from the api using this model, so will send a get request to the api to fetch the current permissions. This can be easily achieved via a store query in the model hook of the admin/permissions/system-roles route. It is important to note here, that findAll is preferred over an empty query. To quote the source of this information,

The reason findAll is preferred over query when no filtering is done is, query will always make a server request. findAll on the other hand, will not make a server request if findAll has already been used once somewhere before. It’ll re-use the data already available whenever possible.

model() {
   return this.get('store').findAll('user-permission');
 }

The user permissions form is not a separate component and is directly embedded in the route template hence, there is no need to explicitly pass the model, it will be available in the route template by default. And can be used as following:

{{#each model as |userPermission|}}
<tr>
  <td>
    {{userPermission.name}}
    <div class="muted text">
      {{userPermission.description}}
    </div>
  </td>
  <td>
     {{ui-checkbox label=(t 'Unverified User') checked=userPermission.unverifiedUser onChange=(action (mut userPermission.unverifiedUser))}}
  </td>
  <td>
    {{ui-checkbox label=(t 'Anonymous User') checked=userPermission.anonymousUser onChange=(action (mut userPermission.anonymousUser))}}
  </td>
</tr>
{{/each}}

In the template after mutating the model’s values according to whether the checkboxes are checked or not, the only thing left is triggering the update action in the controller which will be triggered with the default submit action of the form.

updatePermissions() {
     this.set('isLoading', true);
     this.get('model').save()
       .then(() => {
         this.set('isLoading', false);
         this.notify.success(this.l10n.t('User permissions have been saved successfully.'));
       })
       .catch(()=> {
         this.set('isLoading', false);
         this.notify.error(this.l10n.t('An unexpected error has occurred. User permissions not saved.'));
       });
   }

The controller action first sets the isLoading property to true. This adds the semantic UI class loading to the the form,  and so the form goes in the loading state, to let the user know the request is being processed. Then the save()  call occurs and this makes a PATCH request to the API to update the values stored inside the database. And if the PATCH request is successful, the .then() clause executes, which in addition to setting the isLoading as false, notifies the user that the settings have been saved  successfully using the notify service.

However, in case there is an unexpected error and the PATCH request fails, the .catch() executes. After setting isLoading to false, it notifies the user of the error via an error notification.

Resources

 

 

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Adding JSON API support to ember-models-table in Open Event Front-end

Open Event Front-end project uses ember-models-table for handling all the table components in the application. Although ember-models-table is great for handling server requests for operations like pagination, sorting & filtering, but it does not support JSON API used in the Front-end project.

In this blog we will see how we integrated JSON API standards to ember-models-table. Lets see how we added support for JSON API to table and made requests to the Open Event Orga-server.

Adding JSON API support for filtering & sorting

The JSON API specs follow a strict structure for supporting meta data & filtering options, the server expects an array of objects for specifying the name of the field, operation and the value for filtering. The name attribute specifies the column for which we need to apply the filter. eg we use `name` for the events name in the. `op` attribute specifies the operation to be used for filtration, `val` attribute is used to provide a value for comparison. You can check the list of all the supported operations here.

For implementation of filter we will check if the column filter is being used i.e if the filter string is empty or not, if the string is not empty we add a filter object of the column using the specified specs, else we remove the filter object of the column.

if (filter) {
  query.filter.pushObject({
    name : filterTitle,
    op   : 'ilike',
    val  : `%${filter}%`
  });
} else {
  query.filter.removeObject({
    name : filterTitle,
    op   : 'ilike',
    val  : `%${filter}%`
  });
}

For sort functionally we need to pass a query parameter called `sort` which is a string value in the URL. Sorting can be done in ascending or descending order for which the server expects different values. We pass `sort=name` & `sort=-name` for sorting in ascending order & descending order respectively.

const sortSign = {
  none : '',
  asc  : '-',
  desc : ''
};
let sortedBy = get(column, 'sortedBy');
if (typeOf(sortedBy) === 'undefined') {
  sortedBy = get(column, 'propertyName');
}

Adding support for pagination

The pagination in JSON API is implemented using query parameters `page[size]` & `page[number]` which specify the size of the page & the current page number respectively eg

page[size]=10&page[number]=1

This will load the first ten events from the server in the application.

Once the data is loaded in the application we calculate the number of pages to be rendered. The response from the server has attached meta-data which contains the total number of the events in the following structure:

meta: {
  count: 100
}

We calculate the number of pages by dividing the total count by the size of the page. We check if the number of items is greater than the pageSize, and calculate the number of the pages using the formula `items / pagesize + (items % pagesize ? 1 : 0)`. If the items are less than the pageSize we do not have to calculate the pages and we simply hide the pagination in the footer.

if (pageSize > items) {
  this.$('.pagination').css({
    display: 'none'
  });
} else {
  this.$('.pagination').removeAttr('style');
  pages = parseInt((items / pageSize));
  if (items % pageSize) {
    pages = pages + 1;
  }
}

Adding dynamic routing support to ember-models-table

We may want to use the ember-models-table for dynamic routes like `events/list` route, where we load live, drafted & past events based on the current route. The ember-models-table by default do not support the dynamic routes. To add this we override the didReceiveAttrs() method of the component which is executed every time the component updates. We add reset the pageSize, currentPageNumber and the content of the table, as the routes change.

didReceiveAttrs() {
  set(this, 'pageSize', 10);
  set(this, 'currentPageNumber', 1);
  set(this, 'filteredContent', get(this, 'data'));
}

The result of this we now have tables supporting JSON API in the Open Event Front-end application

Thank you for reading the blog, you can check the source code for the example here.

Resources

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Ember Mixins used in Open Event Frontend

This post will illustrate how ember mixins are used in the Open Event Frontend to avoid code duplication and to keep it clean to reduce code complexity.

The Open Event application needs forms at several places like at the time of login, for the creation of the event, taking the details of the user, creating discount codes for tickets etc. Every form performs similar actions which taking input and finally storing it in the database. In this process, a set of things keep executing in the background such as continuous form validation which means checking inputted values to ensure they are correctly matched with their type as provided in the validation rules, popping out an error message in case of wrong inputted values, etc. which is common to all the forms. The only thing which changes is the set of validation rules which are unique for every form. So let’s see how we solved this issue using Ember Mixins.

While writing the code, we often run into the situation where we need to use the similar behaviour in different parts of the project. We always try not to duplicate the code and keep finding the ways to DRY ( Don’t Repeat Yourself ) up the code. In Ember, we can share the code in the different parts of the project using Ember.Mixins.

While creating the forms, we mostly have differing templates but the component logic remains same. So we created a mixin form.js which contains all the properties which are common to all the forms. The code mixin contains can be reused throughout different parts of the application and is not a concern of any one route, controller, component, etc. The mixins don’t get instantiated until we pass them into some object, and they get created in the order of which they’re passed in. The code for form.js mixin looks like this.

export default Mixin.create({
  autoScrollToErrors : true,
  autoScrollSpeed    : 200,

  getForm() {
    return this.get('$form');
  },

  onValid(callback) {
    this.getForm().form('validate form');
    if (this.getForm().form('is valid')) {
      callback();
    }
  },
  
  didRender() {
      const $popUps = this.$('.has.popup');
      if ($popUps) {
        $popUps.popup({
          hoverable: true
        });
      }
      let $form = this.$('.ui.form');
      if ($form) {
        $form = $form.first();
        if (this.get('getValidationRules') && $form) {
          $form.form(merge(defaultFormRules, this.getValidationRules()));
        }
      },
  didInsertElement() {
    $.fn.form.settings.rules.date = (value, format = FORM_DATE_FORMAT) => {
      if (value && value.length > 0 && format) {
        return moment(value, format).isValid();
      }
      return true;
    };
  }

The complete code can be seen here.

Let’s start understanding the above code. In the first line, we created a mixin via Ember.Mixin.create() method. We have then specified the property ‘autoScrollToErrors’ to true so in case if there is some error, the form will automatically scroll to the error. The property ‘autoScrollSpeed’ specifies the speed with which the form will auto scroll to show the error. ‘getForm()’ method helps in getting the object which will be passed to the mixin. In ‘onValid()’ method we’re validating the form and passing the callbacks if it is correctly validated. We then have ‘didRender()’ method which renders the popups, checkboxes and form rules. The popups help in showing the errors on the form. In this method, we’re fetching the validation rules which are written in child/subclasses which are using this mixin to create the form.  The validation rules help in validating the form and tells if the value inputted is correct or not. In most of the forms, we have a field which asks for some specific date. The piece of code under ‘didInsertElement()’ helps in validating the date and returns true if it is correct. We have ‘willDestroyElement()’ method which destroys the popup if the window is changed/refreshed.

Let see the use case of the above form mixin. At the time of login, we see a form which asks for the user’s credentials to validate if the user is already registered or not. To create that login form we use form mixin. The code for login-form.js looks like this.

export default Component.extend(FormMixin, {
getValidationRules() {
  
fields : {
        identification: {
          identifier : 'email',
          rules      : [
            {
              type   : 'empty',
              prompt : this.l10n.t('Please enter your email ID')
            },
            {
              type   : 'email',
              prompt : this.l10n.t('Please enter a valid email ID')
            }
          ]
        },
        password: {
          identifier : 'password',
          rules      : [
            {
              type   : 'empty',
              prompt : this.l10n.t('Please enter your password')
            }
          ]
        }
      }
   }
});

The complete code can be found here.

We can see that in above code we are creating the form by extending our FormMixin which means that the form will have all the properties which are part of mixin along with the properties which remain unique to this class. Since the validation rules remain unique per form so we’re also providing the rules (easy to comprehend) which will help in validating the fields.

This is how our forms look like after and before applying validation rules.

Fig. 1: Login form before applying validation rules

          Fig. 2: Login form after applying validation rules

To sum it up, we can say that mixins are of great use when we want to keep our code DRY or reduce the code duplication. It helps in removing the unnecessary inheritance keeping it short. The code written using mixin is lesser complex and easily understandable.

References:

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Creating System Images UI in Open Event Frontend

In Open Event Frontend, under the ‘admin/content’ route, ‘system-images’ route is present in which a user can update the image of the event topic he has uploaded at the time of creating an event. We achieved this as follows:

First, we create a route called ‘system/images’.

ember g route admin/content/system-images

This will generate three files:
1) routes/admin/content/system-images.js (route)
2) templates/admin/content/system-images.hbs (template)
3) test/unit/routes/admin/content/system-images-test.js (test file)
We also create a subroute of system-images route so as to render the subtopics queried through API.

ember g route admin/content/system-images/list

This will generate three files:
1) routes/admin/content/system-images/list.js(subroute)
2) templates/admin/content/system-images/list.hbs(template)
3) test/unit/routes/admin/content/system-imageslist-test.js(test file)

From our ‘system-images’ route, we render the ‘system-images’ template. We have a subroute of system-images route called as ‘list’ in which we render the subtopics available to us via API. The left side menu is the content of ‘system-images.hbs’ and the content on the right is it’s subroute i.e ‘list.hbs’. The ‘list’ subroute provides a facility to upload the system image. The API returns an array of objects containing subtopics as follows(single object is shown here, there will be multiple in the array)

{
            id          : 4545,
            name        : 'avatar',
            placeholder : {
              originalImageUrl : 'https://placeimg.com/360/360/any',
              copyright        : 'All rights reserved',
              origin           : 'Google Images'
            }
          },

Following is the content of our uploader i.e ‘list.hbs’ which is a subroute of the system-images.hbs.

<div class="ui segment">
  {{#each model as |subTopic|}}
    <h4>{{subTopic.name}}</h4>
    <img src="{{subTopic.placeholder.originalImageUrl}}" class="ui fluid image" alt={{subTopic.name}}>
    <div class="ui hidden divider"></div>
    <button class="ui button primary" {{action 'openModal' subTopic}} id="changebutton">{{t 'Change'}}</button>
  {{/each}}
</div>
{{modals/change-image-modal isOpen=isModalOpen subTopic=selectedSubTopic}}

We can see from the above template that we are iterating the response(subtopics) from the API. For now, we are just using the mock server response since we don’t have API ready for it. There is one ‘upload’ button which opens up the ‘change-image-modal’ to upload the image which looks as follows:

The ‘change-image-modal.hbs’ has a content as follows:

<div class="sixteen wide column">
        {{widgets/forms/image-upload
          needsCropper=true
          label=(t 'Update Image')
          id='user_image'
          aspectRatio=(if (eq subTopic.name 'avatar') (array 1 1))
          icon='photo'
          hint=(t 'Select Image')
          maxSizeInKb=10000
          helpText=(t 'For Cover Photos : 300x150px (2:1 ratio) image.
                    For Avatar Photos : 150x150px (1:1 ratio) image.')}}

        <form class="ui form">
          <div class="field">
            <label class="ui label">{{t 'Copyright information'}}</label>
            <div class="ui input">
              {{input type="text"}}
            </div>
          </div>
          <div class="field">
            <label class="ui label">{{t 'Origin information'}}</label>
            <div class="ui input">
              {{input type="text"}}
            </div>
          </div>
        </form>

      </div>

The above uploader has a custom ‘image-upload’ widget which we are using throughout the Open Event Frontend. Also, there are two input fields i.e ‘copyright’ and ‘origin’ information of the image. On clicking the ‘Select Image’ button and after selecting our image from the file input, we get a cropper for the image to be uploaded. The image can be cropped there according to the aspect ration maintained for it. The cropper looks like:

Thus, a user can update the image of the Event Topic that he created.

Resources:

Ember JS Official guide.

Mastering modals in Ember JS by Ember Guru.

Source codehttps://github.com/fossasia/open-event-frontend

 

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Implementing Settings API on Open Event Frontend to View and Update Admin Settings

This blog article will illustrate how the admin settings are displayed and updated on the admin settings page in Open Event Frontend, using the settings API. It will also illustrate the use of the notification service to display corresponding notifications on whether the update operation is successful or not. Our discussion primarily will involve the admin/settings/index route to illustrate the process, all other admin settings route work exactly the same way.

The primary end point of Open Event API with which we are concerned with for fetching tickets for an event is

GET /v1/settings

Since there are multiple  routes under admin/settings  including admin/settings/index, and they all will share the same setting model, it is efficient to make the call for Event on the settings route, rather than repeating it for each sub route, so the model for settings route is:

model() {
 return this.store.queryRecord(setting, {});
}

It is important to note that, we need not specify the model for index route or in fact for any of the sub routes of settings.  This is because it is the default behaviour of ember that if the model for a route is not found, it will automatically look for it in the parent  route.  

And hence all that is needed to be done to make the model available in the system settings form  is to pass it while calling the form component.

<div class="ui basic {{if isLoading 'loading' ''}} segment">
 {{forms/admin/settings/system-form save='updateSettings' settings=model}}
</div>

Thus the model properties will be available in the form via settings alias. Next, we need to bind the value property  of the input fields to the corresponding model properties.  Here is a sample snippet on so as to how to achieve that, for the full code please refer to the codebase or the resources below.

<div class="field">
 {{ui-radio label=(t 'Development') current=settings.appEnvironment name='environment' value='development' onChange=(action (mut settings.appEnvironment))}}
</div>
<div class="field">
 {{ui-radio label=(t 'Staging') current=settings.appEnvironment name='environment' value='staging'}}
</div>
<div class="field">
 {{ui-radio label=(t 'Production') current=settings.appEnvironment name='environment' value='production'}}
</div>
<div class="field">
 <label>
   {{t 'App Name'}}
 </label>
 {{input type='text' name='app_name' value=settings.appName}}
</div>
<div class="field">
 <label>
   {{t 'Tagline'}}
 </label>
 {{input type='text' name='tag_line' value=settings.tagline}}
</div>

In the example above, appName, tagLine and appEnvironment are binded to the actual properties in the model. After the required changes have been done, the user next submits the form which triggers the submit action. If the validation is successful, the action updateSettings residing in the controller of the route is triggered, this is where the primary operations happen.

updateSettings() {
 this.set('isLoading', true);
 let settings = this.get('model');
 settings.save()
   .then(() => {
     this.set('isLoading', false);
     this.notify.success(this.l10n.t('Settings have been saved successfully.'));
   })
   .catch(()=> {
     this.set('isLoading', false);
     this.notify.error(this.l10n.t('An unexpected error has occured. Settings not saved.'));
   });
}

The controller action first sets the isLoading property to true. This adds the semantic UI class loading to the segment containing the form, and it and so the form goes in the loading state, to let the user know the requests is being processed. Then the save()  call occurs and this makes a PATCH request to the API to update the values stored inside the database. And if the PATCH request is successful, the .then() clause executes, which in addition to setting the isLoading as false.

However, in case there is an unexpected error and the PATCH request fails, the .catch() executes. After setting isLoading to false, it notifies the user of the error via an error notification.

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Customizing Serializers in Open Event Front-end

Open Event Front-end project primarily uses Ember Data for API requests, which handles sending the request to correct endpoint, serializing and deserializing the request/response. The Open Event API project uses JSON API specs for implementation of the API, supported by Ember data.

While sending request we might want to customize the payload using a custom serializer. While implementing the Users API in the project, we faced a similiar problem. Let’s see how we solved it.

Creating a serializer for model

A serializer is created for a model, in this example we will create a user serializer for the user model. One important thing that we must keep in mind while creating a serializer is to use same name as that of model, so that ember can map the model with the serializer. We can create a serializer using ember-cli command:

ember g serializer user

 
Customizing serializer

In Open Event Front-end project every serializer extends the base serializer application.js which defines basic serialization like omitting readOnly attributes from the payload.

The user serializer provides more customization for the user model on top of application model. We override the serialize function, which lets us manipulate the payload of the request. We use `snapshot.id` to differentiate between a create request & an update request. If `snapshot.id` exists then it is an update request else it is a create request.

While manipulation user properties like email, contact etc we do not need to pass ‘password’ in the payload. We make use of ‘adapterOptions’ property associated with the ‘save()’ method. If the adapterOptions are associated and the ‘includePassword’ is set then we add ‘password’ attribute to the payload.

import ApplicationSerializer from 'open-event-frontend/serializers/application';
import { pick, omit } from 'lodash';

export default ApplicationSerializer.extend({
  serialize(snapshot, options) {
    const json = this._super(...arguments);
    if (snapshot.id) {
      let attributesToOmit = [];
      if (!snapshot.adapterOptions || !snapshot.adapterOptions.includePassword) {
        attributesToOmit.push('password');
      }
      json.data.attributes = omit(json.data.attributes, attributesToOmit);
    } else if (options && options.includeId) {
      json.data.attributes = pick(json.data.attributes, ['email', 'password']);
    }
    return json;
  }
});

If we want to add the password in the payload we can simply add ‘includePassword’ property to the ‘adapterOptions’ and pass it in the save method for operations like changing the password of the user.

user.save({
  adapterOptions: {
    includePassword: true
  }
})

Thank you for reading the blog, you can check the source code for the example here.
Resources

Learn more about how to customize serializers in ember data here

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Adding Event Overview Route in Open Event Frontend

In Open Event Frontend we have an event overview route which is like a mini dashboard for an event where information regarding event sponsors, general info, roles, tickets, event setup etc. is present. All of the information is present in their corresponding components and this dashboard is made up of those components. To create this dashboard we will first create its components.

To create a component we will use following ember command-

ember -g component <component-name>

This command will give us three files: a template, a component and a test file corresponding to that component. We will use this command to generate all our components.

Now let’s discuss each component separately and see how many of them are combined to form this route-

The event-setup-checklist component contains semantic ui’s steps to maintain checklist of basic-details, sponsors, session & microlocation, call for speakers, session and speakers form customization so that it becomes easy to identify which step is complete and which is not.

Next is general-info component which shows basic information about an event like start-time, end-time, location, number of speakers, number of sponsors etc. It also shows whether the event is live or not.

In manage-roles component, manage the role for a given person, add people and assign different roles to them, edit roles for different people. Also we can see who are invited for a given role and who accepted them.

In event-sponsors component we manage the sponsors for the event, edit an existing sponsor, add a new sponsor with their logo, name, type and level. Also we can delete an existing sponsor.

Next is the ticket component which displays the details of number of orders, number of tickets sold, and total sales. Also it displays the number of types of tickets are sold.

Next is our app-component which has two choices. First is to generate android app for the event and second is to generate webapp of the event.

And finally in our view.index template, we add these components using ui stackable grid layout. Whenever we want to conditionally show or hide a component, we can do that in our event.index template and hence it becomes very easy to manage huge amounts content on a single page.

Resources

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File Upload Validations on Open Event Frontend

In Open Event Frontend we have used semantics ui’s form validations to validate different fields of a form. There are certain instances in our app where the user has to upload a file and it is to be validated against the suggested format before uploading it to the server. Here we will discuss how to perform the validation.

Semantics ui allows us to validate by facilitating pass of an object along with rules for its validation. For fields like email and contact number we can pass type as email and number respectively but for validation of file we have to pass a regular expression with allowed extension.The following walks one through the process.

fields : {
  file: {
    identifier : 'file',
    rules      : [
      {
        type   : 'empty',
        prompt : this.l10n.t('Please upload a file')
      },
      {
        type   : 'regExp',
        value  : '/^(.*.((zip|xml|ical|ics|xcal)$))?[^.]*$/i',
        prompt : this.l10n.t('Please upload a file in suggested format')
      }
    ]
  }
}

Here we have passed file element (which is to be validated) inside our fields object identifier, which for this field is ‘file’, and can be identified by its id, name or data-validate property of the field element. After that we have passed an array of rules against which the field element is validated. First rule gives an error message in the prompt field in case of an empty field.

The next rule checks for allowed file extensions for the file. The type of the rule will be regExp as we are passing a regular expression which is as follows-

/^(.*.((zip|xml|ical|ics|xcal)$))?[^.]*$/i

It is little complex to explain it from the beginning so let us breakdown it from end-

 

$ Matches end of the string
[^.]* Negated set. Match any character not in this set. * represents 0 or more preceding token
( … )? Represents if there is something before (the last ?)
.*.((zip|xml|ical|ics|xcal)$) This is first capturing group ,it contains tocken which are combined to create a capture group ( zip|xml|ical|ics|xcal ) to extract a substring
^ the beginning of the string

Above regular expression filters all the files with zip/xml/ical/xcal extensions which are the allowed format for the event source file.

References

  • Ivaylo Gerchev blog on form validation in semantic ui
  • Drmsite blog on semantic ui form validation
  • Semantic ui form validation docs
  • Stackoverflow regex for file extension
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