How to use Realm in SUSI Android to Save Data

Sometimes we need to store information on the device locally so that we can use information offline and also query data faster. Initially, SQLite was only option to store information on the device. But working with SQLite is difficult sometimes and also it makes code difficult to understand. Also, SQL queries take a long time. But now we have realm a better alternative of SQLite. The Realm is a lightweight mobile database and better substitute of SQLite. The Realm has own C++ core and store data in a universal, table-based format by a C++ core. This allows Realm to allow data access from multiple languages as well as a range of queries. In this blog post, I will show you why we used Realm and how we save data in SUSI Android using Realm.

“How about performance? Well, we’re glad you asked 🙂 For all the API goodness & development productivity we give you, we’re still up to 100x faster than some SQLite ORMs and on average ~10x faster than raw SQLite and common ORMs for typical operations.” (compare: https://blog.realm.io/realm-for-android/)

Advantages of Realm over SQLite are following:

  • It is faster than SQLite as explained on the Realm blog. One of the reasons realm is faster than SQLite is, the traditional SQLite + ORM abstraction is leaky because ORM simply converts  Objects and their methods into SQL statements. Realm, on the other hand, is an object database, meaning your objects directly reflect your database.
  • It is easier to use as it uses objects for storing data. When we use SQLite we need boilerplate code to convert values to and from the database, setting up mappings between classes and tables, fields and columns, foreign keys, etc. Whereas in Realm data is directly exposed as objects and can be queried without any conversion.

Prerequisites

To include this library in your project you need

  • Android studio version 1.5.1 or higher.
  • JDK version 7.0 or higher.
  • Android API level 9 or higher.

How to use realm in Android

To use Realm in your project we must add the dependency of the library in build.gradle(project) file 

 dependencies {
       classpath “io.realm:realm-gradle-plugin:3.3.1”
   }

and build.gradle(module) file.

apply plugin: realm-android
dependencies {
compile io.realm:android-adapters:1.3.0
}

Now you have to instantiate Realm in your application class. Setting a default configuration in your Application class, will ensure that it is available in the rest of your code.

RealmConfiguration realmConfiguration = new RealmConfiguration.Builder(this)
                                                              .deleteRealmIfMigrationNeeded().build();
Realm.setDefaultConfiguration(realmConfiguration);

Now we need to create a model class. A model class is use to save data in Realm and retrieve saved data and it must extend RealmObject class. For eg.

public class Person extends RealmObject {
   private String name;
   public String getName() {
       return name;
   }
   public void setName(String name) {
       this.name = name;
   }
}

Field in the model class uses to define columns. For eg. ‘name’ is a column name. Method like setName() use to save data  and getName() use to retrieve saved data.

Now create an instance of the Realm in the activity where you want to use it. It will be used to read data from the Realm and write data to the Realm.

Realm realm = Realm.getInstance(this);

Before you start a new transaction you must call beginTransaction(). It will open database.

realm.beginTransaction();

To write data to the Realm you need to create an instance of the model class. createObject used to create an instance of RealmObject class. Our model class is RealmObject type so we use createObject() to create an instance of the model class.

Person person = realm.createObject(Person.class);

Write data to realm.

person.setName(“MSDHONI”);

And after it you must call commitTransaction(). commitTransaction() use to end transaction.

realm.commitTransaction();

Reading data from Realm is easier than writing data to it. You need to create an instance of the Realm.

Realm realm = Realm.getInstance(this);

To create query use where the method and pass the class of object you want to query. After creating query you can fetch all data using findAll() method.

realm.where(Person.class).findAll();

Reference

Open Event API Server: Implementing FAQ Types

In the Open Event Server, there was a long standing request of the users to enable the event organisers to create a FAQ section.

The API of the FAQ section was implemented subsequently. The FAQ API allowed the user to specify the following request schema

{
 "data": {
   "type": "faq",
   "relationships": {
     "event": {
       "data": {
         "type": "event",
         "id": "1"
       }
     }
   },
   "attributes": {
     "question": "Sample Question",
     "answer": "Sample Answer"
   }
 }
}

 

But, what if the user wanted to group certain questions under a specific category. There was no solution in the FAQ API for that. So a new API, FAQ-Types was created.

Why make a separate API for it?

Another question that arose while designing the FAQ-Types API was whether it was necessary to add a separate API for it or not. Consider that a type attribute was simply added to the FAQ API itself. It would mean the client would have to specify the type of the FAQ record every time a new record is being created for the same. This would mean trusting that the user will always enter the same spelling for questions falling under the same type. The user cannot be trusted on this front. Thus the separate API made sure that the types remain controlled and multiple entries for the same type are not there.

Helps in handling large number of records:

Another concern was what if there were a large number of FAQ records under the same FAQ-Type. Entering the type for each of those questions would be cumbersome for the user. The FAQ-Type would also overcome this problem

Following is the request schema for the FAQ-Types API

{
 "data": {
   "attributes": {
     "name": "abc"
   },
   "type": "faq-type",
   "relationships": {
     "event": {
       "data": {
         "id": "1",
         "type": "event"
       }
     }
   }
 }
}

 

Additionally:

  • FAQ to FAQ-type is a many to one relation.
  • A single FAQ can only belong to one Type
  • The FAQ-type relationship will be optional, if the user wants different sections, he/she can add it ,if not, it’s the user’s choice.

Related links

Discount Codes in Open Event Server

The Open Event System allows usage of discount codes with tickets and events. This blogpost describes what types of discount codes are present and what endpoints can be used to fetch and update details.

In Open Event API Server, each event can have two types of discount codes. One is ‘event’ discount code, while the other is ‘ticket’ discount code. As the name suggests, the event discount code is an event level discount code and the ticket discount code is ticket level.

Now each event can have only one ‘event’ discount code and is accessible only to the server admin. The Open Event server admin can create, view and update the ‘event’ discount code for an event. The event discount code followsDiscountCodeEvent Schema. This schema is inherited from the parent class DiscountCodeSchemaPublic. To save the unique discount code associated with an event, the event model’s discount_code_id field is used.

The ‘ticket’ discount is accessible by the event organizer and co-organizer. Each event can have any number of ‘ticket’ discount codes. This follows the DiscountCodeTicket schema, which is also inherited from the same base class ofDiscountCodeSchemaPublic. The use of the schema is decided based on the value of the field ‘used_for’ which can have the value either ‘events’ or ‘tickets’. Both the schemas have different relationships with events and marketer respectively.

We have the following endpoints for Discount Code events and tickets:
‘/events/<int:event_id>/discount-code’
‘/events/<int:event_id>/discount-codes’

The first endpoint is based on the DiscountCodeDetail class. It returns the detail of one discount code which in this case is the event discount code associated with the event.

The second endpoint is based on the DiscountCodeList class which returns a list of discount codes associated with an event. Note that this list also includes the ‘event’ discount code, apart from all the ticket discount codes.

class DiscountCodeFactory(factory.alchemy.SQLAlchemyModelFactory):
   class Meta:
       model = DiscountCode
       sqlalchemy_session = db.session
event_id = None
user = factory.RelatedFactory(UserFactory)
user_id = 1


Since each discount code belongs to an event(either directly or through the ticket), the factory for this has event as related factory, but to check for 
/events/<int:event_id>/discount-code endpoint we first need the event and then pass the discount code id to be 1 for dredd to check this. Hence, event is not included as a related factory, but added as a different object every time a discount code object is to be used.

@hooks.before("Discount Codes > Get Discount Code Detail of an Event > Get Discount Code Detail of an Event")
def event_discount_code_get_detail(transaction):
   """
   GET /events/1/discount-code
   :param transaction:
   :return:
   """
   with stash['app'].app_context():
       discount_code = DiscountCodeFactory()
       db.session.add(discount_code)
       db.session.commit()
       event = EventFactoryBasic(discount_code_id=1)
       db.session.add(event)
       db.session.commit()


The other tests and extended documentation can be found 
here.

References:

Open Event Server: Getting The Identity From The Expired JWT Token In Flask-JWT

The Open Event Server uses JWT based authentication, where JWT stands for JSON Web Token. JSON Web Tokens are an open industry standard RFC 7519 method for representing claims securely between two parties. [source: https://jwt.io/]

Flask-JWT is being used for the JWT-based authentication in the project. Flask-JWT makes it easy to use JWT based authentication in flask, while on its core it still used PyJWT.

To get the identity when a JWT token is present in the request’s Authentication header , the current_identity proxy of Flask-JWT can be used as follows:

@app.route('/example')
@jwt_required()
def example():
   return '%s' % current_identity

 

Note that it will only be set in the context of function decorated by jwt_required(). The problem with the current_identity proxy when using jwt_required is that the token has to be active, the identity of an expired token cannot be fetched by this function.

So why not write a function on our own to do the same. A JWT token is divided into three segments. JSON Web Tokens consist of three parts separated by dots (.), which are:

  • Header
  • Payload
  • Signature

The first step would be to get the payload, that can be done as follows:

token_second_segment = _default_request_handler().split('.')[1]

 

The payload obtained above would still be in form of JSON, it can be converted into a dict as follows:

payload = json.loads(token_second_segment.decode('base64'))

 

The identity can now be found in the payload as payload[‘identity’]. We can get the actual user from the paylaod as follows:

def jwt_identity(payload):
   """
   Jwt helper function
   :param payload:
   :return:
   """
   return User.query.get(payload['identity'])

 

Our final function will now be something like:

def get_identity():
   """
   To be used only if identity for expired tokens is required, otherwise use current_identity from flask_jwt
   :return:
   """
   token_second_segment = _default_request_handler().split('.')[1]
   missing_padding = len(token_second_segment) % 4
   payload = json.loads(token_second_segment.decode('base64'))
   user = jwt_identity(payload)
   return user

 

But after using this function for sometime, you will notice that for certain tokens, the system will raise an error saying that the JWT token is missing padding. The JWT payload is base64 encoded, and it requires the payload string to be a multiple of four. If the string is not a multiple of four, the remaining spaces can pe padded with extra =(equal to) signs. And since Python 2.7’s .decode doesn’t do that by default, we can accomplish that as follows:

missing_padding = len(token_second_segment) % 4

# ensures the string is correctly padded to be a multiple of 4
if missing_padding != 0:
   token_second_segment += b'=' * (4 - missing_padding)

 

Related links:

Using Universal Image Loader to Display Image on Phimpme Android Application

In Phimpme Android application we needed to load image on the sharing Activity fast so that there won’t be any delay that is visible by a user in the loading of any activity. We used Universal Image Loader to load the image on the sharing Activity to load Image faster.

Getting Universal Image Loader

To get Universal Image Loader in your application go to Gradle(app)-> and then add the following line of code inside dependencies:

dependencies{

compile 'com.nostra13.universalimageloader:universal-image-loader:1.9.4'

}

Initialising Universal Image Loader and Displaying Image

To display image on using Universal Image Loader we need to convert the image into a URI from a file path:

saveFilePath = getIntent().getStringExtra(EXTRA_OUTPUT);
Uri uri = Uri.fromFile(new File(saveFilePath));

How an image should be displayed

We need to display the image in such a way that it covers the whole image view in the sharing Activity. The image should be zoomed out. The quality of the image should not be distorted or reduced. The image should look as it is. The image should be zoomable so that the user can pinch to zoom in and zoom out. For the image to adjust the whole Image View we set ImageScaleType.EXACTLY_STRETCHED. We will also set cacheInMemory to true and cacheOnDisc to true.  

private void initView() {
   saveFilePath = getIntent().getStringExtra(EXTRA_OUTPUT);
   Uri uri = Uri.fromFile(new File(saveFilePath));
   ImageLoader imageLoader = ((MyApplication)getApplicationContext()).getImageLoader();
   DisplayImageOptions options = new DisplayImageOptions.Builder()
           .cacheOnDisc(true)
           .imageScaleType(ImageScaleType.EXACTLY_STRETCHED)
           .cacheInMemory(true)
           .bitmapConfig(Bitmap.Config.RGB_565)
           .build();
   imageLoader.displayImage(uri.toString(), shareImage, options);
}

Image Loader function in MyApplication class:

private void initImageLoader() {
   File cacheDir = com.nostra13.universalimageloader.utils.StorageUtils.getCacheDirectory(this);
   int MAXMEMONRY = (int) (Runtime.getRuntime().maxMemory());
   // System.out.println("dsa-->"+MAXMEMONRY+"   "+(MAXMEMONRY/5));//.memoryCache(new
   // LruMemoryCache(50 * 1024 * 1024))
   DisplayImageOptions defaultOptions = new DisplayImageOptions.Builder()
           .cacheInMemory(true)
           .cacheOnDisk(true)
           .build();

   ImageLoaderConfiguration config = new ImageLoaderConfiguration.Builder(
           this).memoryCacheExtraOptions(480, 800).defaultDisplayImageOptions(defaultOptions)
           .diskCacheExtraOptions(480, 800, null).threadPoolSize(3)
           .threadPriority(Thread.NORM_PRIORITY - 2)
           .tasksProcessingOrder(QueueProcessingType.FIFO)
           .denyCacheImageMultipleSizesInMemory()
           .memoryCache(new LruMemoryCache(MAXMEMONRY / 5))
           .diskCache(new UnlimitedDiskCache(cacheDir))
           .diskCacheFileNameGenerator(new HashCodeFileNameGenerator()) // default
           .imageDownloader(new BaseImageDownloader(this)) // default
           .imageDecoder(new BaseImageDecoder(false)) // default
           .defaultDisplayImageOptions(DisplayImageOptions.createSimple()).build();

   this.imageLoader = ImageLoader.getInstance();
   imageLoader.init(config);
}

Image View in Sharing Activity XML file:

In the Sharing Activity Xml resource, we need to specify the width of the image view and the height of the image view. In Phimpme Android application we are using ImageViewTouch so that we have features like touch to zoom in zoom out. The scale type of the imageView is centerCrop so that image which is loaded is zoomed out and focus is in the center of the image.  

<org.fossasia.phimpme.editor.view.imagezoom.ImageViewTouch
   android:layout_width="match_parent"
   android:layout_height="wrap_content"
   android:id="@+id/share_image"
   android:layout_below="@+id/toolbar"
   android:layout_weight="10"
   android:layout_alignParentStart="true"
   android:scaleType="centerCrop"/>

Conclusion

To load image faster on any ImageView we should use Universal Image Loader. It helps load the activity faster and allows many features as discussed in the blog.

 

Github

Resources

Implementation of Set Different Language for Query in SUSI Android

SUSI.AI has many skills. Some of which are displaying web search of a certain query, provide a list of relevant information of a topic, displaying a map of the certain position and simple text message of any query. Previously SUSI.AI reply all query in English language but now one important feature is added in SUSI.AI and that feature is, reply query of the user in the language that user wants. But to get the reply in different language user has to send language code of that language along with query to SUSI Server. In this blog post, I will show you how it is implemented in SUSI Android app.

Different language supported in SUSI Android

Currently, different languages added in option in SUSI Android and their language code are:

Language Language Code
English en
German de
Spanish es
French fr
Italian it
Default Default language of the device.

Layout design

I added an option for choosing the different language in settings. When the user clicks on Language option a dialog box pops up. I used listpreference to show the list of different languages.

<ListPreference

  android:title=“@string/Language”

  android:key=“Lang_Select”

  android:entries=“@array/languagentries”

  android:entryValues=“@array/languagentry”>

</ListPreference>

“title” is used to show the title of setting, “entries” is used to show the list of entry to the user and “entryValue” is the value corresponding to each entry. I used listpreference because it has own UI so we don‘t have to develop our own UI for it and also it stores the string into the SharedPreferences so we don’t need to manage the values in SharedPreference. SharedPreference needed to set value in Language in settings so that once user close app and again open it setting will show same value otherwise it will show default value. We used an array of string to show the list of languages.

<string-array name=“languagentries”>

  <item>Default</item>

  <item>English</item>

  <item>German</item>

  <item>Spanish</item>

  <item>French</item>

  <item>Italian</item>

</string-array>

SetLanguage implementation

To set language user must choose Language option in setting.

On clicking Language option a dialog box pop up with the list of different languages. When the user chooses a language then we save corresponding language code in preference with key “prefLanguage” so that we can use it later to send it to the server along with the query. It also uses to send language to the server to store user language on the server, so that user can use the same language in the different client.

querylanguage.setOnPreferenceChangeListener { _, newValue ->

  PrefManager.putString(Constant.LANGUAGE, newValue.toString())

  if(!settingsPresenter.getAnonymity()) {

      settingsPresenter.sendSetting(Constant.LANGUAGE, newValue.toString(), 1)

  }

}

newValue.toString() is the value i.e language code of corresponding language.

Now when we query anything from SUSI.AI we send language code along with query to the server. Default language is default language of the device. Before sending language to the server we check language is default language or any specific language.

val language = if (PrefManager.getString(Constant.LANGUAGE, Constant.DEFAULT).equals(Constant.DEFAULT))

Locale.getDefault().language

else PrefManager.getString(Constant.LANGUAGE, Constant.DEFAULT)

And after that, we send the corresponding language along with query to the server.

clientBuilder.susiApi.getSusiResponse(timezoneOffset, longitude, latitude, source, language, query)

Reference

Introducing Stream Servlet in loklak Server

A major part of my GSoC proposal was adding stream API to loklak server. In a previous blog post, I discussed the addition of Mosquitto as a message broker for MQTT streaming. After testing this service for a few days and some minor improvements, I was in a position to expose the stream to outside users using a simple API.

In this blog post, I will be discussing the addition of /api/stream.json endpoint to loklak server.

HTTP Server-Sent Events

Server-sent events (SSE) is a technology where a browser receives automatic updates from a server via HTTP connection. The Server-Sent Events EventSource API is standardized as part of HTML5 by the W3C.

Wikipedia

This API is supported by all major browsers except Microsoft Edge. For loklak, the plan was to use this event system to send messages, as they arrive, to the connected users. Apart from browser support, EventSource API can also be used with many other technologies too.

Jetty Eventsource Plugin

For Java, we can use Jetty’s EventSource plugin to send events to clients. It is similar to other Jetty servlets when it comes to processing the arguments, handling requests, etc. But it provides a simple interface to send events as they occur to connected users.

Adding Dependency

To use this plugin, we can add the following line to Gradle dependencies –

compile group: 'org.eclipse.jetty', name: 'jetty-eventsource-servlet', version: '1.0.0'

[SOURCE]

The Event Source

An EventSource is the object which is required for EventSourceServlet to send events. All the logics for emitting events needs to be defined in the related class. To link a servlet with an EventSource, we need to override the newEventSource method –

public class StreamServlet extends EventSourceServlet {
    @Override
    protected EventSource newEventSource(HttpServletRequest request) {
        String channel = request.getParameter("channel");
        if (channel == null) {
            return null;
        }
        if (channel.isEmpty()) {
            return null;
        }
        return new MqttEventSource(channel);
    }
}

[SOURCE]

If no channel is provided, the EventSource object will be null and the request will be rejected. Here, the MqttEventSource would be used to handle the stream of Tweets as they arrive from the Mosquitto message broker.

Cross Site Requests

Since the requests to this endpoint can’t be of JSONP type, it is necessary to allow cross site requests on this endpoint. This can be done by overriding the doGet method of the servlet –

@Override
protected void doGet(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response) throws ServletException, IOException {
     response.setHeader("Access-Control-Allow-Origin", "*");
    super.doGet(request, response);
}

[SOURCE]

Adding MQTT Subscriber

When a request for events arrives, the constructor to MqttEventSource is called. At this stage, we need to connect to the stream from Mosquitto for the channel. To achieve this, we can set the class as MqttCallback using appropriate client configurations –

public class MqttEventSource implements MqttCallback {
    ...
    MqttEventSource(String channel) {
        this.channel = channel;
    }
    ...
    this.mqttClient = new MqttClient(address, "loklak_server_subscriber");
    this.mqttClient.connect();
    this.mqttClient.setCallback(this);
    this.mqttClient.subscribe(this.channel);
    ...
}

[SOURCE]

By setting the callback to this, we can override the messageArrived method to handle the arrival of a new message on the channel. Just to mention, the client library used here is Eclipse Paho.

Connecting MQTT Stream to SSE Stream

Now that we have subscribed to the channel we wish to send events from, we can use the Emitter to send events from our EventSource by implementing it –

public class MqttEventSource implements EventSource, MqttCallback {
    private Emitter emitter;


    @Override
    public void onOpen(Emitter emitter) throws IOException {
        this.emitter = emitter;
        ...
    }

    @Override
    public void messageArrived(String topic, MqttMessage message) throws Exception {
        this.emitter.data(message.toString());
    }
}

[SOURCE]

Closing Stream on Disconnecting from User

When a client disconnects from the stream, it doesn’t makes sense to stay connected to the server. We can use the onClose method to disconnect the subscriber from the MQTT broker –

@Override
public void onClose() {
    try {
        this.mqttClient.close();
        this.mqttClient.disconnect();
    } catch (MqttException e) {
        // Log some warning 
    }
}

[SOURCE]

Conclusion

In this blog post, I discussed connecting the MQTT stream to SSE stream using Jetty’s EventSource plugin. Once in place, this event system would save us from making too many requests to collect and visualize data. The possibilities of applications of such feature are huge.

This feature can be seen in action at the World Mood Tracker app.

The changes were introduced in pull request loklak/loklak_server#1474 by @singhpratyush (me).

Resources

Making SUSI Alexa skill as an express app

Previously SUSI Alexa skill was deployed using AWS Lambda service (Refer to this blog). Each SUSI.AI Bot should be deployed on Google cloud using Kubernetes. To accomplish that, we need to remove the dependency of the SUSI Alexa skill from AWS Lambda service. We need to make it an express app, to be able to deploy it to Google cloud. Let’s start with on how to achieve it:

SUSI Alexa skill:

We require three files to make the skill as an express app. The main entry point for the skill would be server.js file, which will serve the incoming request using two helper files alexa.js and handlers.js.

Server.js:

This file acts as the main entry point for the incoming request. We handle two type of requests using it, that are:

  1. Launch request
  2. Intent request

Launch request is triggered when a person utters “Alexa, open susi chat” , “Alexa, start susi chat”, “Alexa, launch susi chat” etc. This request is responded with an introductory phrase about SUSI.AI. To catch this request:

if (type === "LaunchRequest") {
        var endpoint = "http://api.susi.ai/susi/chat.json?q="+"Welcome"; // ENDPOINT GOES HERE
        
        http.get(endpoint, (response1) => {
            var body = "";
            response1.on("data", (chunk) => { body += chunk; });
            response1.on("end", () => {
                var viewCount;
                viewCount = JSON.parse(body).answers[0].actions[0].expression;
                endpoint = "http://api.susi.ai/susi/chat.json?q="+"Get+started"; // ENDPOINT GOES HERE
                body = "";
                http.get(endpoint, (response2) => {
                    response2.on("data", (chunk) => { body += chunk; });
                    response2.on("end", () => {
                        viewCount += JSON.parse(body);.answers[0].actions[0].expression;
                        response.say(viewCount,false);
                    });
                });
            });
        });
    }

Intent request gets triggered, when any other phrase is uttered by the user except Launch related phrases. We check if the intent triggered has a corresponding handler to handle the request. If the handler is found in handlers.js file, we call it passing the required arguments to the handler function. Let’s see how handlers make this step possible.

Handler.js:

This file decides on what function to run when a particular type of intent is triggered. As we have just one intent for our SUSI Alexa skill i.e. callSusiApi, we have just one function in our handlers.js file. During its execution, the first step we do is extract the query value:

let query = slots.query.value;

Depending upon the query value, we run its corresponding code. For example, in case of a generic query (i.e. any query except stop, cancel and help):

var endpoint = "http://api.susi.ai/susi/chat.json?q="+query; // ENDPOINT GOES HERE

http.get(endpoint, (response1) => {
    var body = "";
    response1.on("data", (chunk) => { body += chunk; });
    response1.on("end", () => {
        var data = JSON.parse(body);
        if(data.answers[0].actions[1]){
            // handle rss and table type results
        }
        else
        {
            viewCount = data.answers[0].actions[0].expression;
        }
        response.say(viewCount,true);
    });
});

At the end of the function we respond to the user with an answer to his/her query using:

response.say(viewCount,true);

Alexa.js:

When we get a request from the user, we pass that request and response object to this file. This file helps us wrap the required request properties into an object and return that back to the server file, which was the entry point for the request. Now, we can easily extract the properties in server file and work with those:

We extract the properties like this:

let session = req.body.session,
        intent,
        slots;
session.attributes = session.attributes || {};

if (req.body.request.intent) {
    intent = req.body.request.intent.name;
    slots = req.body.request.intent.slots;
}

Then we return the object back at the end:

return {
        type: req.body.request.type,
        intent: intent,
        slots: slots,
        session: session,
        response: {
            say: (text, shouldEndSession) => say(text, shouldEndSession),
            ask: (text, shouldEndSession) => say(text, shouldEndSession)
        }
    };

Great, we have made the SUSI Alexa skill as an express app. The next step is to do some changes in the configuration tab of our skill:

  1. Instead of Amazon resource number, we fill our webhook address here: 

  2. A new property shows up that is SSL certificate. As we are using Heroku for webhook services, we select the second option as shown below: 

  3. It’s time to test the skill: 

    This repository by Salesforce helped me a lot in making the SUSI skill as an express app.

    Resources:

    1. Developing Alexa Skills Locally with Node.js by Josh Skeen from Bignerdranch.
    2. Amazon Alexa Skills: Create a Custom Skill by Simon Coope from SJCNET.

How to Parse HTML Tags and Anchor Clickable Links in SUSI Android App

Html tags are used to define how contents of a webpage should be formatted and displayed. Sometimes the SUSI answer type response contains some html tags but showing these html tags without parsing would distort the normal text flow in SUSI Android.

For the query ‘Ask me something’ SUSI’s reply is

“data”: [
     {
      “question”: “Which soccer team won the Copa Am&eacute;rica 2015 Championship ? “,                                          
     }]

In SUSI Android this message looks like

As you can see that showing html tags without parsing distort the normal text flow. So we need to parse html tags properly. We use Html class for this purpose. Html class is present in android.text package and you can import it in the class where you want to use it.

import android.text.Html

fromHtml method of Html class is used to parse html tags. But for API level less than 24 and equal to or greater than 24 we use different parameters in fromHtml method.

For API level less than 24 we used

Html.fromHtml(model.getContent())

But for API level equal to or greater than 24 we have to use

Html.fromHtml(model.getContent(), Html.FROM_HTML_MODE_COMPACT)

Here the second parameter is legacy flags which decides how text inside a tag will be shown after parsing.

In case of Html.fromHtml(String string) legacy flag is by default FROM_HTML_MODE_LEGACY. It indicates that separate block-level elements with blank lines.

So after parsing html tags using fromHtml

But return type of fromHtml method is Spanned so if you need String then you have to convert it into string using toString() method.

Anchor action type in susi response contains link and text.

       “link”: “https://www.openstreetmap.org/#map=13/1.2896698812440377/103.85006683126556”,
       “text”: “Link to Openstreetmap: Singapore”

Here the text is the text we show in textview and link is used to show web content in the browser when user click on text. So first link and text are attached together like

“<a href=\”” +susiResponse.getAnswers().get(0).getActions().get(i).getAnchorLink() + “\”>”
+ susiResponse.getAnswers().get(0).getActions().get(1).getAnchorText() + “</a>”

Here text between the tag is description of link and after parsing we show this text in textview. It can be parsed using fromHtml method of Html class and textview is made clickable by

chatTextView.setMovementMethod(LinkMovementMethod.getInstance());

Resources

Reset Password Option in SUSI Android App

Login and signup are an important feature for some android apps like chat apps because the user will want to save and secure personal messages from others. In SUSI Android app we provide a token to a logged-in user for a limit period of time so that once the user logs in and someone else gets access to the device, then he/she can’t use the user account for a long period of time. It is a security provided from our side but the user also has to maintain some security. Cyber security risks have increased and hacking technologies have improved a lot in the past 10 years. So, using the same password for a long period of time absolutely puts your account security at risk. So to keep your account secure you should change/reset your password regularly. In this blog post, I will show you how reset password option is implemented in SUSI Android app.

Layout design for reset password

Reset password option is added in the setting. When the user clicks on reset password option a dialog box pops up. There are three textinputlayout boxes – each for the current password, new password and confirm password. I have used textinputlayout instead of simple edittext box because it helps user to show first “hint” and when user taps on, hint will come up with text over it as floating label so that the user can understand what to add in that box and also in case of error we can show that error to user.

Reset Password implementation

On clicking reset password option a dialog box appears in which user inserts the current password, new password and confirm password to confirm the new password. Before sending new password to the server we perform two checks

  1. New password should not be empty and length of new password should be at least six.
  2. New password and confirm password must be same.
if (!CredentialHelper.isPasswordValid(newPassword)) {

settingView?.passwordInvalid(Constant.NEW_PASSWORD)

return

}

if (newPassword != conPassword) {

settingView?.invalidCredentials(false, Constant.NEW_PASSWORD)

return

}

And when these two checks are passed we send “new password” to server.

Endpoint use to reset password is

http://api.susi.ai/aaa/changepassword.json?changepassword=your mail id&password=current password&newpassword=newpassword

As you can see it needed three parameters

  • changepassword: Your email id
  • password : Your current password
  • newpassword: Your new password

When user logs in, we save user’s email id so that the user doesn’t have to provide it again and again when the user wants to change the password.

utilModel.saveEmail(email)

The user provides current password and new password through dialog box. We used resetPassword method to reset the password. We send these three parameters to the server using resetPassword method and if the password changed successfully then server sends a message.

override fun resetPassword(password: String, newPassword: String, listener: ISettingModel.onSettingFinishListener) {

  val email = PrefManager.getString(Constant.SAVE_EMAIL, null)

  resetPasswordResponseCall = ClientBuilder().susiApi

          .resetPasswordResponse(email,password,newPassword)

  resetPasswordResponseCall.enqueue(object : Callback<ResetPasswordResponse> {

  } )

}

We used retrofit library for network call and resetPasswordResponse is a model class using which we are retrieving server response.

Reference