Open Event Server – Export Speakers as PDF File

FOSSASIA‘s Open Event Server is the REST API backend for the event management platform, Open Event. Here, the event organizers can create their events, add tickets for it and manage all aspects from the schedule to the speakers. Also, once he/she makes his event public, others can view it and buy tickets if interested.

The organizer can see all the speakers in a very detailed view in the event management dashboard. He can see the statuses of all the speakers. The possible statuses are pending, accepted, and rejected. He/she can take actions such as editing the speakers.

If the organizer wants to download the list of all the speakers as a PDF file, he or she can do it very easily by simply clicking on the Export As PDF button in the top right-hand corner.

Let us see how this is done on the server.

Server side – generating the Speakers PDF file

Here we will be using the pisa package which is used to convert from HTML to PDF. It is a html2pdf converter which uses ReportLab Toolkit, the HTML5lib and pyPdf. It supports HTML5 and CSS 2.1 (and some of CSS 3). It is completely written in pure Python so it is platform independent.

from xhtml2pdf import pisa<

We have a utility method create_save_pdf which creates and saves PDFs from HTML. It takes the following arguments:

  • pdf_data – This contains the HTML template which has to be converted to PDF.
  • key – This contains the file name
  • dir_path – This contains the directory

It returns the newly formed PDF file. The code is as follows:

def create_save_pdf(pdf_data, key, dir_path='/static/uploads/pdf/temp/'):
   filedir = current_app.config.get('BASE_DIR') + dir_path

   if not os.path.isdir(filedir):
       os.makedirs(filedir)

   filename = get_file_name() + '.pdf'
   dest = filedir + filename

   file = open(dest, "wb")
   pisa.CreatePDF(io.BytesIO(pdf_data.encode('utf-8')), file)
   file.close()

   uploaded_file = UploadedFile(dest, filename)
   upload_path = key.format(identifier=get_file_name())
   new_file = upload(uploaded_file, upload_path)
   # Removing old file created
   os.remove(dest)

   return new_file

The HTML file is formed using the render_template method of flask. This method takes the HTML template and its required variables as the arguments. In our case, we pass in ‘pdf/speakers_pdf.html’(template) and speakers. Here, speakers is the list of speakers to be included in the PDF file. In the template, we loop through each item of speakers. We print his name, email, list of its sessions, mobile, a short biography, organization, and position. All these fields form a row in the table. Hence, each speaker is a row in our PDF file.

The various columns are as follows:

<thead>
<tr>
   <th>
       {{ ("Name") }}
   </th>
   <th>
       {{ ("Email") }}
   </th>
   <th>
       {{ ("Sessions") }}
   </th>
   <th>
       {{ ("Mobile") }}
   </th>
   <th>
       {{ ("Short Biography") }}
   </th>
   <th>
       {{ ("Organisation") }}
   </th>
   <th>
       {{ ("Position") }}
   </th>
</tr>
</thead>

A snippet of the code which handles iterating over the speakers’ list and forming a row is as follows:

{% for speaker in speakers %}
   <tr class="padded" style="text-align:center; margin-top: 5px">
       <td>
           {% if speaker.name %}
               {{ speaker.name }}
           {% else %}
               {{ "-" }}
           {% endif %}
       </td>
       <td>
           {% if speaker.email %}
               {{ speaker.email }}
           {% else %}
               {{ "-" }}
           {% endif %}
       </td>
       <td>
           {% if speaker.sessions %}
               {% for session in speaker.sessions %}
                   {{ session.name }}<br>
               {% endfor %}
           {% else %}
               {{ "-" }}
           {% endif %}
       </td>
      …. So on
   </tr>
{% endfor %}

The full template can be found here.

Obtaining the Speakers PDF file:

Firstly, we have an API endpoint which starts the task on the server.

GET - /v1/events/{event_identifier}/export/speakers/pdf

Here, event_identifier is the unique ID of the event. This endpoint starts a celery task on the server to export the speakers of the event as a PDF file. It returns the URL of the task to get the status of the export task. A sample response is as follows:

{
  "task_url": "/v1/tasks/b7ca7088-876e-4c29-a0ee-b8029a64849a"
}

The user can go to the above-returned URL and check the status of his/her Celery task. If the task completed successfully he/she will get the download URL. The endpoint to check the status of the task is:

and the corresponding response from the server –

{
  "result": {
    "download_url": "/v1/events/1/exports/http://localhost/static/media/exports/1/zip/OGpMM0w2RH/event1.zip"
  },
  "state": "SUCCESS"
}

The file can be downloaded from the above-mentioned URL.

Resources

Continue Reading

Open Event Server – Export Sessions as PDF File

FOSSASIA‘s Open Event Server is the REST API backend for the event management platform, Open Event. Here, the event organizers can create their events, add tickets for it and manage all aspects from the schedule to the speakers. Also, once he/she makes his event public, others can view it and buy tickets if interested.

The organizer can see all the sessions in a very detailed view in the event management dashboard. He can see the statuses of all the sessions. The possible statuses are pending, accepted, confirmed and rejected. He/she can take actions such as accepting/rejecting the sessions.

If the organizer wants to download the list of all the sessions as a PDF file, he or she can do it very easily by simply clicking on the Export As PDF button in the top right-hand corner.

Let us see how this is done on the server.

Server side – generating the Sessions PDF file

Here we will be using the pisa package which is used to convert from HTML to PDF. It is a html2pdf converter which uses ReportLab Toolkit, the HTML5lib and pyPdf. It supports HTML5 and CSS 2.1 (and some of CSS 3). It is completely written in pure Python so it is platform independent.

from xhtml2pdf import pisa

We have a utility method create_save_pdf which creates and saves PDFs from HTML. It takes the following arguments:

  • pdf_data – This contains the HTML template which has to be converted to PDF.
  • key – This contains the file name
  • dir_path – This contains the directory

It returns the newly formed PDF file. The code is as follows:

def create_save_pdf(pdf_data, key, dir_path='/static/uploads/pdf/temp/'):
   filedir = current_app.config.get('BASE_DIR') + dir_path

   if not os.path.isdir(filedir):
       os.makedirs(filedir)

   filename = get_file_name() + '.pdf'
   dest = filedir + filename

   file = open(dest, "wb")
   pisa.CreatePDF(io.BytesIO(pdf_data.encode('utf-8')), file)
   file.close()

   uploaded_file = UploadedFile(dest, filename)
   upload_path = key.format(identifier=get_file_name())
   new_file = upload(uploaded_file, upload_path)
   # Removing old file created
   os.remove(dest)

   return new_file

The HTML file is formed using the render_template method of flask. This method takes the HTML template and its required variables as the arguments. In our case, we pass in ‘pdf/sessions_pdf.html’(template) and sessions. Here, sessions is the list of sessions to be included in the PDF file. In the template, we loop through each item of sessions and check if it is deleted or not. If it not deleted then we print its title, state, list of its speakers, track, created at and has an email been sent or not. All these fields form a row in the table. Hence, each session is a row in our PDF file.

The various columns are as follows:

<thead>
<tr>
   <th>
       {{ ("Title") }}
   </th>
   <th>
       {{ ("State") }}
   </th>
   <th>
       {{ ("Speakers") }}
   </th>
   <th>
       {{ ("Track") }}
   </th>
   <th>
       {{ ("Created At") }}
   </th>
   <th>
       {{ ("Email Sent") }}
   </th>
</tr>
</thead>

A snippet of the code which handles iterating over the sessions list and forming a row is as follows:

{% for session in sessions %}
   {% if not session.deleted_at %}
       <tr class="padded" style="text-align:center; margin-top: 5px">
           <td>
               {% if session.title %}
                   {{ session.title }}
               {% else %}
                   {{ "-" }}
               {% endif %}
           </td>
           <td>
               {% if session.state %}
                   {{ session.state }}
               {% else %}
                   {{ "-" }}
               {% endif %}
           </td>
           <td>
               {% if session.speakers %}
                   {% for speaker in session.speakers %}
                       {{ speaker.name }}<br>
                   {% endfor %}
               {% else %}
                   {{ "-" }}
               {% endif %}
           </td>
          ….. And so on
       </tr>
   {% endif %}
{% endfor %}

The full template can be found here.

Obtaining the Sessions PDF file:

Firstly, we have an API endpoint which starts the task on the server.

GET - /v1/events/{event_identifier}/export/sessions/pdf

Here, event_identifier is the unique ID of the event. This endpoint starts a celery task on the server to export the sessions of the event as a PDF file. It returns the URL of the task to get the status of the export task. A sample response is as follows:

{
  "task_url": "/v1/tasks/b7ca7088-876e-4c29-a0ee-b8029a64849a"
}

The user can go to the above-returned URL and check the status of his/her Celery task. If the task completed successfully he/she will get the download URL. The endpoint to check the status of the task is:

and the corresponding response from the server –

{
  "result": {
    "download_url": "/v1/events/1/exports/http://localhost/static/media/exports/1/zip/OGpMM0w2RH/event1.zip"
  },
  "state": "SUCCESS"
}

The file can be downloaded from the above-mentioned URL.

Resources

Continue Reading

Open Event Server – Export Speakers as CSV File

FOSSASIA‘s Open Event Server is the REST API backend for the event management platform, Open Event. Here, the event organizers can create their events, add tickets for it and manage all aspects from the schedule to the speakers. Also, once he/she makes his event public, others can view it and buy tickets if interested.

The organizer can see all the speakers in a very detailed view in the event management dashboard. He can see the statuses of all the speakers. The possible statuses are pending, accepted and rejected. He/she can take actions such as editing/viewing speakers.

If the organizer wants to download the list of all the speakers as a CSV file, he or she can do it very easily by simply clicking on the Export As CSV button in the top right-hand corner.

Let us see how this is done on the server.

Server side – generating the Speakers CSV file

Here we will be using the csv package provided by python for writing the csv file.

import csv
  • We define a method export_speakers_csv which takes the speakers to be exported as a CSV file as the argument.
  • Next, we define the headers of the CSV file. It is the first row of the CSV file.
def export_speakers_csv(speakers):
   headers = ['Speaker Name', 'Speaker Email', 'Speaker Session(s)',
              'Speaker Mobile', 'Speaker Bio', 'Speaker Organisation', 'Speaker Position']
  • A list is defined called rows. This contains the rows of the CSV file. As mentioned earlier, headers is the first row.
rows = [headers]
  • We iterate over each speaker in speakers and form a row for that speaker by separating the values of each of the columns by a comma. Here, every row is one speaker.
  • As a speaker can contain multiple sessions we iterate over each session for that particular speaker and append each session to a string. ‘;’ is used as a delimiter. This string is then added to the row. We also include the state of the session – accepted, rejected, confirmed.
  • The newly formed row is added to the rows list.
for speaker in speakers:
   column = [speaker.name if speaker.name else '', speaker.email if speaker.email else '']
   if speaker.sessions:
       session_details = ''
       for session in speaker.sessions:
           if not session.deleted_at:
               session_details += session.title + ' (' + session.state + '); '
       column.append(session_details[:-2])
   else:
       column.append('')
   column.append(speaker.mobile if speaker.mobile else '')
   column.append(speaker.short_biography if speaker.short_biography else '')
   column.append(speaker.organisation if speaker.organisation else '')
   column.append(speaker.position if speaker.position else '')
   rows.append(column)
  • rows contains the contents of the CSV file and hence it is returned.
return rows
  • We iterate over each item of rows and write it to the CSV file using the methods provided by the csv package.
with open(file_path, "w") as temp_file:
   writer = csv.writer(temp_file)
   from app.api.helpers.csv_jobs_util import export_speakers_csv
   content = export_speakers_csv(speakers)
   for row in content:
       writer.writerow(row)

Obtaining the Speakers CSV file:

Firstly, we have an API endpoint which starts the task on the server.

GET - /v1/events/{event_identifier}/export/speakers/csv

Here, event_identifier is the unique ID of the event. This endpoint starts a celery task on the server to export the speakers of the event as a CSV file. It returns the URL of the task to get the status of the export task. A sample response is as follows:

{
  "task_url": "/v1/tasks/b7ca7088-876e-4c29-a0ee-b8029a64849a"
}

The user can go to the above-returned URL and check the status of his/her Celery task. If the task completed successfully he/she will get the download URL. The endpoint to check the status of the task is:

and the corresponding response from the server –

{
  "result": {
    "download_url": "/v1/events/1/exports/http://localhost/static/media/exports/1/zip/OGpMM0w2RH/event1.zip"
  },
  "state": "SUCCESS"
}

The file can be downloaded from the above-mentioned URL.

Resources

Continue Reading

Open Event Server – Export Sessions as CSV File

FOSSASIA‘s Open Event Server is the REST API backend for the event management platform, Open Event. Here, the event organizers can create their events, add tickets for it and manage all aspects from the schedule to the speakers. Also, once he/she makes his event public, others can view it and buy tickets if interested.

The organizer can see all the sessions in a very detailed view in the event management dashboard. He can see the statuses of all the sessions. The possible statuses are pending, accepted, confirmed and rejected. He/she can take actions such as accepting/rejecting the sessions.

If the organizer wants to download the list of all the sessions as a CSV file, he or she can do it very easily by simply clicking on the Export As CSV button in the top right-hand corner.

Let us see how this is done on the server.

Server side – generating the Sessions CSV file

Here we will be using the csv package provided by python for writing the csv file.

import csv
  • We define a method export_sessions_csv which takes the sessions to be exported as a CSV file as the argument.
  • Next, we define the headers of the CSV file. It is the first row of the CSV file.
def export_sessions_csv(sessions):
   headers = ['Session Title', 'Session Speakers',
              'Session Track', 'Session Abstract', 'Created At', 'Email Sent']
  • A list is defined called rows. This contains the rows of the CSV file. As mentioned earlier, headers is the first row.
rows = [headers]
  • We iterate over each session in sessions and form a row for that session by separating the values of each of the columns by a comma. Here, every row is one session.
  • As a session can contain multiple speakers we iterate over each speaker for that particular session and append each speaker to a string. ‘;’ is used as a delimiter. This string is then added to the row.
  • The newly formed row is added to the rows list.
for session in sessions:
   if not session.deleted_at:
       column = [session.title + ' (' + session.state + ')' if session.title else '']
       if session.speakers:
           in_session = ''
           for speaker in session.speakers:
               if speaker.name:
                   in_session += (speaker.name + '; ')
           column.append(in_session[:-2])
       else:
           column.append('')
       column.append(session.track.name if session.track and session.track.name else '')
       column.append(strip_tags(session.short_abstract) if session.short_abstract else '')
       column.append(session.created_at if session.created_at else '')
       column.append('Yes' if session.is_mail_sent else 'No')
       rows.append(column)
  • rows contains the contents of the CSV file and hence it is returned.
return rows
  • We iterate over each item of rows and write it to the CSV file using the methods provided by the csv package.
writer = csv.writer(temp_file)
from app.api.helpers.csv_jobs_util import export_sessions_csv
content = export_sessions_csv(sessions)
for row in content:
   writer.writerow(row)

Obtaining the Sessions CSV file:

Firstly, we have an API endpoint which starts the task on the server.

GET - /v1/events/{event_identifier}/export/sessions/csv

Here, event_identifier is the unique ID of the event. This endpoint starts a celery task on the server to export the sessions of the event as a CSV file. It returns the URL of the task to get the status of the export task. A sample response is as follows:

{
  "task_url": "/v1/tasks/b7ca7088-876e-4c29-a0ee-b8029a64849a"
}

The user can go to the above-returned URL and check the status of his/her Celery task. If the task completed successfully he/she will get the download URL. The endpoint to check the status of the task is:

and the corresponding response from the server –

{
  "result": {
    "download_url": "/v1/events/1/exports/http://localhost/static/media/exports/1/zip/OGpMM0w2RH/event1.zip"
  },
  "state": "SUCCESS"
}

The file can be downloaded from the above-mentioned URL.

Resources

Continue Reading

Open Event Server – Export Attendees as CSV File

FOSSASIA‘s Open Event Server is the REST API backend for the event management platform, Open Event. Here, the event organizers can create their events, add tickets for it and manage all aspects from the schedule to the speakers. Also, once he/she makes his event public, others can view it and buy tickets if interested.

The organizer can see all the attendees in a very detailed view in the event management dashboard. He can see the statuses of all the attendees. The possible statuses are completed, placed, pending, expired and canceled, checked in and not checked in. He/she can take actions such as checking in the attendee.

If the organizer wants to download the list of all the attendees as a CSV file, he or she can do it very easily by simply clicking on the Export As and then on CSV.

Let us see how this is done on the server.

Server side – generating the Attendees CSV file

Here we will be using the csv package provided by python for writing the csv file.

import csv
  • We define a method export_attendees_csv which takes the attendees to be exported as a CSV file as the argument.
  • Next, we define the headers of the CSV file. It is the first row of the CSV file.
def export_attendees_csv(attendees):
   headers = ['Order#', 'Order Date', 'Status', 'First Name', 'Last Name', 'Email',
              'Country', 'Payment Type', 'Ticket Name', 'Ticket Price', 'Ticket Type']
  • A list is defined called rows. This contains the rows of the CSV file. As mentioned earlier, headers is the first row.
rows = [headers]
  • We iterate over each attendee in attendees and form a row for that attendee by separating the values of each of the columns by a comma. Here, every row is one attendee.
  • The newly formed row is added to the rows list.
for attendee in attendees:
   column = [str(attendee.order.get_invoice_number()) if attendee.order else '-',
             str(attendee.order.created_at) if attendee.order and attendee.order.created_at else '-',
             str(attendee.order.status) if attendee.order and attendee.order.status else '-',
             str(attendee.firstname) if attendee.firstname else '',
             str(attendee.lastname) if attendee.lastname else '',
             str(attendee.email) if attendee.email else '',
             str(attendee.country) if attendee.country else '',
             str(attendee.order.payment_mode) if attendee.order and attendee.order.payment_mode else '',
             str(attendee.ticket.name) if attendee.ticket and attendee.ticket.name else '',
             str(attendee.ticket.price) if attendee.ticket and attendee.ticket.price else '0',
             str(attendee.ticket.type) if attendee.ticket and attendee.ticket.type else '']

   rows.append(column)
  • rows contains the contents of the CSV file and hence it is returned.
return rows
  • We iterate over each item of rows and write it to the CSV file using the methods provided by the csv package.
writer = csv.writer(temp_file)
from app.api.helpers.csv_jobs_util import export_attendees_csv
content = export_attendees_csv(attendees)
for row in content:
   writer.writerow(row)

Obtaining the Attendees CSV file:

Firstly, we have an API endpoint which starts the task on the server.

GET - /v1/events/{event_identifier}/export/attendees/csv

Here, event_identifier is the unique ID of the event. This endpoint starts a celery task on the server to export the attendees of the event as a CSV file. It returns the URL of the task to get the status of the export task. A sample response is as follows:

{
  "task_url": "/v1/tasks/b7ca7088-876e-4c29-a0ee-b8029a64849a"
}

The user can go to the above-returned URL and check the status of his/her Celery task. If the task completed successfully he/she will get the download URL. The endpoint to check the status of the task is:

and the corresponding response from the server –

{
  "result": {
    "download_url": "/v1/events/1/exports/http://localhost/static/media/exports/1/zip/OGpMM0w2RH/event1.zip"
  },
  "state": "SUCCESS"
}

The file can be downloaded from the above-mentioned URL.

References

Continue Reading

Open Event Server – Export Orders as CSV File

FOSSASIA‘s Open Event Server is the REST API backend for the event management platform, Open Event. Here, the event organizers can create their events, add tickets for it and manage all aspects from the schedule to the speakers. Also, once he/she makes his event public, others can view it and buy tickets if interested.

The organizer can see all the orders in a very detailed view in the event management dashboard. He can see the statuses of all the orders. The possible statuses are completed, placed, pending, expired and canceled.

If the organizer wants to download the list of all the orders as a CSV file, he or she can do it very easily by simply clicking on the Export As and then on CSV.

Let us see how this is done on the server.

Server side – generating the Orders CSV file

Here we will be using the csv package provided by python for writing the csv file.

import csv
  • We define a method export_orders_csv which takes the orders to be exported as a CSV file as the argument.
  • Next, we define the headers of the CSV file. It is the first row of the CSV file.
def export_orders_csv(orders):
   headers = ['Order#', 'Order Date', 'Status', 'Payment Type', 'Total Amount', 'Quantity',
              'Discount Code', 'First Name', 'Last Name', 'Email']
  • A list is defined called rows. This contains the rows of the CSV file. As mentioned earlier, headers is the first row.
rows = [headers]
  • We iterate over each order in orders and form a row for that order by separating the values of each of the columns by a comma. Here, every row is one order.
  • The newly formed row is added to the rows list.
for order in orders:
   if order.status != "deleted":
       column = [str(order.get_invoice_number()), str(order.created_at) if order.created_at else '',
                 str(order.status) if order.status else '', str(order.paid_via) if order.paid_via else '',
                 str(order.amount) if order.amount else '', str(order.get_tickets_count()),
                 str(order.discount_code.code) if order.discount_code else '',
                 str(order.user.first_name)
                 if order.user and order.user.first_name else '',
                 str(order.user.last_name)
                 if order.user and order.user.last_name else '',
                 str(order.user.email) if order.user and order.user.email else '']
       rows.append(column)
  • rows contains the contents of the CSV file and hence it is returned.
return rows
  • We iterate over each item of rows and write it to the CSV file using the methods provided by the csv package.
writer = csv.writer(temp_file)
from app.api.helpers.csv_jobs_util import export_orders_csv
content = export_orders_csv(orders)
for row in content:
   writer.writerow(row)

Obtaining the Orders CSV file:

Firstly, we have an API endpoint which starts the task on the server.

GET - /v1/events/{event_identifier}/export/orders/csv

Here, event_identifier is the unique ID of the event. This endpoint starts a celery task on the server to export the orders of the event as a CSV file. It returns the URL of the task to get the status of the export task. A sample response is as follows:

{
  "task_url": "/v1/tasks/b7ca7088-876e-4c29-a0ee-b8029a64849a"
}</span

The user can go to the above-returned URL and check the status of his/her Celery task. If the task completed successfully he/she will get the download URL. The endpoint to check the status of the task is:

and the corresponding response from the server –

{
  "result": {
    "download_url": "/v1/events/1/exports/http://localhost/static/media/exports/1/zip/OGpMM0w2RH/event1.zip"
  },
  "state": "SUCCESS"
}

The file can be downloaded from the aabove-mentionedURL.

References

Continue Reading

Open Event Server – Export Event as a Pentabarf XML File

FOSSASIA‘s Open Event Server is the REST API backend for the event management platform, Open Event. Here, the event organizers can create their events, add tickets for it and manage all aspects from the schedule to the speakers. Also, once he makes his event public, others can view it and buy tickets if interested.

To make event promotion easier, we also provide the event organizer to export his event as a Pentabarf XML file. Pentabarf XML is used to store events/conferences in a format which most of the scheduling applications can read and add that particular event/conference to the user’s schedule.

Server side – generating the Pentabarf XML file

Here we will be using the pentabarf package for Python for parsing and creating the file.

from pentabarf.Conference import Conference
from pentabarf.Day import Day
from pentabarf.Event import Event
from pentabarf.Person import Person
from pentabarf.Room import Room
  • We define a class PentabarfExporter which has a static method export(event_id).
  • Query the event using the event_id passed and start forming the event in the required format:
event = EventModel.query.get(event_id)
diff = (event.ends_at - event.starts_at)

conference = Conference(title=event.name, start=event.starts_at, end=event.ends_at,
                       days=diff.days if diff.days > 0 else 1,
                       day_change="00:00", timeslot_duration="00:15",
                       venue=event.location_name)
dates = (db.session.query(cast(Session.starts_at, DATE))
        .filter_by(event_id=event_id)
        .filter_by(state='accepted')
        .filter(Session.deleted_at.is_(None))
        .order_by(asc(Session.starts_at)).distinct().all())
  • We have queried for the dates of the event and saved it in dates.
  • We will now iterate over each date and query the microlocations who have a session on that particular date.
for date in dates:
   date = date[0]
   day = Day(date=date)
   microlocation_ids = list(db.session.query(Session.microlocation_id)
                            .filter(func.date(Session.starts_at) == date)
                            .filter_by(state='accepted')
                            .filter(Session.deleted_at.is_(None))
                            .order_by(asc(Session.microlocation_id)).distinct())
  • For each microlocation thus obtained, we will query for accepted sessions to be held at those microlocations.
  • We will also initialize a Room for each microlocation.
for microlocation_id in microlocation_ids:
   microlocation_id = microlocation_id[0]
   microlocation = Microlocation.query.get(microlocation_id)
   sessions = Session.query.filter_by(microlocation_id=microlocation_id) \
       .filter(func.date(Session.starts_at) == date) \
       .filter_by(state='accepted') \
       .filter(Session.deleted_at.is_(None)) \
       .order_by(asc(Session.starts_at)).all()

   room = Room(name=microlocation.name)
  • We will now iterate over the aabove-obtained sessions and instantiate an Event for each session.
  • Then we will iterate over all the speakers of that session and instantiate a Person for each speaker.
  • Finally, we will add that Event to the Room we created earlier.
for session in sessions:

   session_event = Event(id=session.id,
                         date=session.starts_at,
                         start=session.starts_at,
                         duration=str(session.ends_at - session.starts_at) + "00:00",
                         track=session.track.name,
                         abstract=session.short_abstract,
                         title=session.title,
                         type='Talk',
                         description=session.long_abstract,
                         conf_url=url_for('event_detail.display_event_detail_home',
                                          identifier=event.identifier),
                         full_conf_url=url_for('event_detail.display_event_detail_home',
                                               identifier=event.identifier, _external=True),
                         released="True" if event.schedule_published_on else "False")

   for speaker in session.speakers:
       person = Person(id=speaker.id, name=speaker.name)
       session_event.add_person(person)

   room.add_event(session_event)
  • Then we will add the room to the day and then add each day to the conference.
day.add_room(room)
conference.add_day(day)
  • Finally, we will call the generate method of the conference to generate the XML file. This can be directly written to the file.
return conference.generate("Generated by " + get_settings()['app_name'])

Obtaining the Pentabarf XML file:

Firstly, we have an API endpoint which starts the task on the server.

GET - /v1/events/{event_identifier}/export/pentabarf

Here, event_identifier is the unique ID of the event. This endpoint starts a celery task on the server to export the event as a Pentabarf XML file. It returns the task of the URL to get the status of the export task. A sample response is as follows:

{
  "task_url": "/v1/tasks/b7ca7088-876e-4c29-a0ee-b8029a64849a"
}

The user can go to the above-returned URL and check the status of his Celery task. If the task completed successfully he will get the download URL. The endpoint to check the status of the task is:

and the corresponding response from the server –

{
  "result": {
    "download_url": "/v1/events/1/exports/http://localhost/static/media/exports/1/zip/OGpMM0w2RH/event1.zip"
  },
  "state": "SUCCESS"
}

The file can be downloaded from the above-mentioned URL.

Hence, now the event can be added to any scheduling app which recognizes the Pentabarf XML format.

References

Continue Reading

Open Event Server – Export Event as xCalendar File

FOSSASIA‘s Open Event Server is the REST API backend for the event management platform, Open Event. Here, the event organizers can create their events, add tickets for it and manage all aspects from the schedule to the speakers. Also, once he makes his event public, others can view it and buy tickets if interested.

To make event promotion easier, we also provide the event organizer to export his event as an xCalendar file. xCal is an XML representation of the iCalendar standard. xCal is not an alternative nor next generation of iCalendar. xCal represents iCalendar components, properties, and parameters as defined in iCalendar. This format was selected to ease its translation back to the iCalendar format using an XSLT transform.

Server side – generating the xCal file

Here we will be using the xml.etree.ElementTree package for Python for parsing and creating XML data.

from xml.etree.ElementTree import Element, SubElement, tostring
  • We define a class XCalExporter which has a static method export(event_id).
  • Query the event using the event_id passed and start forming the calendar:
event = Event.query.get(event_id)

tz = event.timezone or 'UTC'
tz = pytz.timezone(tz)

i_calendar_node = Element('iCalendar')
i_calendar_node.set('xmlns:xCal', 'urn:ietf:params:xml:ns:xcal')
v_calendar_node = SubElement(i_calendar_node, 'vcalendar')
version_node = SubElement(v_calendar_node, 'version')
version_node.text = '2.0'
prod_id_node = SubElement(v_calendar_node, 'prodid')
prod_id_node.text = '-//fossasia//open-event//EN'
cal_desc_node = SubElement(v_calendar_node, 'x-wr-caldesc')
cal_desc_node.text = "Schedule for sessions at " + event.name
cal_name_node = SubElement(v_calendar_node, 'x-wr-calname')
cal_name_node.text = event.name
  • We query for the accepted sessions of the event and store it in sessions
sessions = Session.query \
   .filter_by(event_id=event_id) \
   .filter_by(state='accepted') \
   .filter(Session.deleted_at.is_(None)) \
   .order_by(asc(Session.starts_at)).all()
  • We then iterate through all the sessions in sessions.
  • If it is a valid session, we instantiate a SubElement and store required details
v_event_node = SubElement(v_calendar_node, 'vevent')

method_node = SubElement(v_event_node, 'method')
method_node.text = 'PUBLISH'

uid_node = SubElement(v_event_node, 'uid')
uid_node.text = str(session.id) + "-" + event.identifier

dtstart_node = SubElement(v_event_node, 'dtstart')
dtstart_node.text = tz.localize(session.starts_at).isoformat()

…. So on
  • We then loop through all the speakers in that particular session and add it to the xCal calendar node object as well.
for speaker in session.speakers:
   attendee_node = SubElement(v_event_node, 'attendee')
   attendee_node.text = speaker.name
  • And finally, the string of the calendar node is returned. This is the xCalendar file contents. This can be directly written to a file.
return tostring(i_calendar_node)

Obtaining the xCal file:

Firstly, we have an API endpoint which starts the task on the server.

GET - /v1/events/{event_identifier}/export/xcal

Here, event_identifier is the unique ID of the event. This endpoint starts a celery task on the server to export the event as an xCal file. It returns the URL of the task to get the status of the export task. A sample response is as follows:

{
  "task_url": "/v1/tasks/b7ca7088-876e-4c29-a0ee-b8029a64849a"
}

The user can go to the above-returned URL and check the status of his Celery task. If the task completed successfully he will get the download URL. The endpoint to check the status of the task is:

and the corresponding response from the server –

{
  "result": {
    "download_url": "/v1/events/1/exports/http://localhost/static/media/exports/1/zip/OGpMM0w2RH/event1.zip"
  },
  "state": "SUCCESS"
}

The file can be downloaded from the above mentioned URL.

Hence, now the event can be added to any scheduling app which recognizes the xcs format.

References

Continue Reading

Open Event Server – Export Event as an iCalendar File

FOSSASIA‘s Open Event Server is the REST API backend for the event management platform, Open Event. Here, the event organizers can create their events, add tickets for it and manage all aspects from the schedule to the speakers. Also, once he makes his event public, others can view it and buy tickets if interested.

To make event promotion easier, we also provide the event organizer to export his event as an iCalendar file. Going by the Wikipedia definition, iCalendar is a computer file format which allows Internet users to send meeting requests and tasks to other Internet users by sharing or sending files in this format through various methods. The files usually have an extension of .ics. With supporting software, such as an email reader or calendar application, recipients of an iCalendar data file can respond to the sender easily or counter propose another meeting date/time. The file format is specified in a proposed internet standard (RFC 5545) for calendar data exchange.

Server side – generating the iCal file

Here we will be using the icalendar package for Python as the file writer.

from icalendar import Calendar, vCalAddress, vText
  • We define a class ICalExporter which has a static method export(event_id).
  • Query the event using the event_id passed and start forming the calendar:
event = EventModel.query.get(event_id)

cal = Calendar()
cal.add('prodid', '-//fossasia//open-event//EN')
cal.add('version', '2.0')
cal.add('x-wr-calname', event.name)
cal.add('x-wr-caldesc', "Schedule for sessions at " + event.name)
  • We query for the accepted sessions of the event and store it in sessions.
sessions = Session.query \
   .filter_by(event_id=event_id) \
   .filter_by(state='accepted') \
   .filter(Session.deleted_at.is_(None)) \
   .order_by(asc(Session.starts_at)).all()
  • We then iterate through all the sessions in sessions.
  • If it is a valid session, we instantiate an icalendar event and store required details.
event_component = icalendar.Event()
event_component.add('summary', session.title)
event_component.add('uid', str(session.id) + "-" + event.identifier)
event_component.add('geo', (event.latitude, event.longitude))
event_component.add('location', session.microlocation.name or '' + " " + event.location_name)
event_component.add('dtstart', tz.localize(session.starts_at))
event_component.add('dtend', tz.localize(session.ends_at))
event_component.add('email', event.email)
event_component.add('description', session.short_abstract)
event_component.add('url', url_for('event_detail.display_event_detail_home',
                                  identifier=event.identifier, _external=True))
  • We then loop through all the speakers in that particular session and add it to the iCal Event object as well.
for speaker in session.speakers:
   # Ref: http://icalendar.readthedocs.io/en/latest/usage.html#file-structure
   # can use speaker.email below but privacy reasons
   attendee = vCalAddress('MAILTO:' + event.email if event.email else '[email protected]')
   attendee.params['cn'] = vText(speaker.name)
   event_component.add('attendee', attendee)
  • This event_component is then added to the cal object that we created in the beginning.
cal.add_component(event_component)
  • And finally, the cal.to_ical() is returned. This is the iCalendar file contents. This can be directly written to a file.
return cal.to_ical()

Obtaining the iCal file:

Firstly, we have an API endpoint which starts the task on the server.

GET - /v1/events/{event_identifier}/export/ical

Here, event_identifier is the unique ID of the event. This endpoint starts a celery task on the server to export the event as an iCal file. It returns the task of the URL to get the status of the export task. A sample response is as follows:

{
  "task_url": "/v1/tasks/b7ca7088-876e-4c29-a0ee-b8029a64849a"
}

The user can go to the above returned URL and check the status of his Celery task. If the task completed successfully he will get the download URL. The endpoint to check the status of the task is:

and the corresponding response from the server –

{
  "result": {
    "download_url": "/v1/events/1/exports/http://localhost/static/media/exports/1/zip/OGpMM0w2RH/event1.zip"
  },
  "state": "SUCCESS"
}

The file can be downloaded from the above mentioned URL.

Hence, now the event can be added to any scheduling app which recognizes the ics format.

References

Continue Reading

Export an Event using APIs of Open Event Server

We in FOSSASIA’s Open Event Server project, allow the organizer, co-organizer and the admins to export all the data related to an event in the form of an archive of JSON files. This way the data can be reused in some other place for various different purposes. The basic workflow is something like this:

  • Send a POST request in the /events/{event_id}/export/json with a payload containing whether you require the various media files.
  • The POST request starts a celery task in the background to start extracting data related to event and jsonifying them
  • The celery task url is returned as a response. Sending a GET request to this url gives the status of the task. If the status is either FAILED or SUCCESS then there is the corresponding error message or the result.
  • Separate JSON files for events, speakers, sessions, micro-locations, tracks, session types and custom forms are created.
  • All this files are then archived and the zip is then served on the endpoint /events/{event_id}/exports/{path}
  • Sending a GET request to the above mentioned endpoint downloads a zip containing all the data related to the endpoint.

Let’s dive into each of these points one-by-one

POST request ( /events/{event_id}/export/json)

For making a POST request you firstly need a JWT authentication like most of the other API endpoints. You need to send a payload containing the settings for whether you want the media files related with the event to be downloaded along with the JSON files. An example payload looks like this:

{
   "image": true,
   "video": true,
   "document": true,
   "audio": true
 }

def export_event(event_id):
    from helpers.tasks import export_event_task

    settings = EXPORT_SETTING
    settings['image'] = request.json.get('image', False)
    settings['video'] = request.json.get('video', False)
    settings['document'] = request.json.get('document', False)
    settings['audio'] = request.json.get('audio', False)
    # queue task
    task = export_event_task.delay(
        current_identity.email, event_id, settings)
    # create Job
    create_export_job(task.id, event_id)

    # in case of testing
    if current_app.config.get('CELERY_ALWAYS_EAGER'):
        # send_export_mail(event_id, task.get())
        TASK_RESULTS[task.id] = {
            'result': task.get(),
            'state': task.state
        }
    return jsonify(
        task_url=url_for('tasks.celery_task', task_id=task.id)
    )


Taking the settings about the media files and the event id, we pass them as parameter to the export event celery task and queue up the task. We then create an entry in the database with the task url and the event id and the user who triggered the export to keep a record of the activity. After that we return as response the url for the celery task to the user.

If the celery task is still underway it show a response with ‘state’:’WAITING’. Once, the task is completed, the value of ‘state’ is either ‘FAILED’ or ‘SUCCESS’. If it is SUCCESS it returns the result of the task, in this case the download url for the zip.

Celery Task to Export Event

Exporting an event is a very time consuming process and we don’t want that this process to come in the way of user interaction with other services. So we needed to use a queueing system that would queue the tasks and execute them in the background with disturbing the main worker from executing the other user requests. We have used celery to queue tasks in the background and execute them without disturbing the other user requests.

We have created a celery task namely “export.event” which calls the event_export_task_base() which in turn calls the export_event_json() where all the jsonification process is carried out. To start the celery task all we do is export_event_task.delay(event_id, settings) and it return a celery task object with a task id that can be used to check the status of the task.

@celery.task(base=RequestContextTask, name='export.event', bind=True)
def export_event_task(self, email, event_id, settings):
    event = safe_query(db, Event, 'id', event_id, 'event_id')
    try:
        logging.info('Exporting started')
        path = event_export_task_base(event_id, settings)
        # task_id = self.request.id.__str__()  # str(async result)
        download_url = path

        result = {
            'download_url': download_url
        }
        logging.info('Exporting done.. sending email')
        send_export_mail(email=email, event_name=event.name, download_url=download_url)
    except Exception as e:
        print(traceback.format_exc())
        result = {'__error': True, 'result': str(e)}
        logging.info('Error in exporting.. sending email')
        send_export_mail(email=email, event_name=event.name, error_text=str(e))

    return result


After exporting a path to the export zip is returned. We then get the downloading endpoint and return it as the result of the celery task. In case there is an error in the celery task, we print an entire traceback in the celery worker and return the error as a result.

Make the Exported Zip Ready

We have a separate export_helpers.py file in the helpers module of API for performing various tasks related to exporting all the data of the event. The most important function in this file is the export_event_json(). This file accepts the event_id and the settings dictionary. In the export helpers we have global constant dictionaries which contain the order in which the fields are to appear in the JSON files created while exporting.

Firstly, we create the directory for storing the exported JSON and finally the archive of all the JSON files. Then we have a global dictionary named EXPORTS which contains all the tables and their corresponding Models which we want to extract from the database and store as JSON.  From the EXPORTS dict we get the Model names. We use this Models to make queries with the given event_id and retrieve the data from the database. After retrieving data, we use another helper function named _order_json which jsonifies the sqlalchemy data in the order that is mentioned in the dictionary. After this we download the media data, i.e. the slides, images, videos etc. related to that particular Model depending on the settings.

def export_event_json(event_id, settings):
    """
    Exports the event as a zip on the server and return its path
    """
    # make directory
    exports_dir = app.config['BASE_DIR'] + '/static/uploads/exports/'
    if not os.path.isdir(exports_dir):
        os.mkdir(exports_dir)
    dir_path = exports_dir + 'event%d' % int(event_id)
    if os.path.isdir(dir_path):
        shutil.rmtree(dir_path, ignore_errors=True)
    os.mkdir(dir_path)
    # save to directory
    for e in EXPORTS:
        if e[0] == 'event':
            query_obj = db.session.query(e[1]).filter(
                e[1].id == event_id).first()
            data = _order_json(dict(query_obj.__dict__), e)
            _download_media(data, 'event', dir_path, settings)
        else:
            query_objs = db.session.query(e[1]).filter(
                e[1].event_id == event_id).all()
            data = [_order_json(dict(query_obj.__dict__), e) for query_obj in query_objs]
            for count in range(len(data)):
                data[count] = _order_json(data[count], e)
                _download_media(data[count], e[0], dir_path, settings)
        data_str = json.dumps(data, indent=4, ensure_ascii=False).encode('utf-8')
        fp = open(dir_path + '/' + e[0], 'w')
        fp.write(data_str)
        fp.close()
    # add meta
    data_str = json.dumps(
        _generate_meta(), sort_keys=True,
        indent=4, ensure_ascii=False
    ).encode('utf-8')
    fp = open(dir_path + '/meta', 'w')
    fp.write(data_str)
    fp.close()
    # make zip
    shutil.make_archive(dir_path, 'zip', dir_path)
    dir_path = dir_path + ".zip"

    storage_path = UPLOAD_PATHS['exports']['zip'].format(
        event_id=event_id
    )
    uploaded_file = UploadedFile(dir_path, dir_path.rsplit('/', 1)[1])
    storage_url = upload(uploaded_file, storage_path)

    return storage_url


After we receive the json data from the _order_json() function, we create a dump of the json using json.dumps with an indentation of 4 spaces and utf-8 encoding. Then we save this dump in a file named according to the model from which the data was retrieved. This process is repeated for all the models that are mentioned in the EXPORTS dictionary. After all the JSON files are created and all the media is downloaded, we make a zip of the folder.

To do this we use shutil.make_archive. It creates a zip and uploads the zip to the storage service used by the server such as S3, google storage, etc. and returns the url for the zip through which it can be accessed.

Apart from this function, the other major function in this file is to create an export job entry in the database so that we can keep a track about which used started a task related to which event and help us in debugging and security purposes.

Downloading the Zip File

After the exporting is completed, if you send a GET request to the task url, you get a response similar to this:

{
   "result": {
     "download_url": "http://localhost:5000/static/media/exports/1/zip/OGpMM0w2RH/event1.zip"
   },
   "state": "SUCCESS"
 }

So on opening the download url in the browser or using any other tool, you can download the zip file.

One big question however remains is, all the workflow is okay but how do you understand after sending the POST request, that the task is completed and ready to be downloaded? One way of solving this problem is a technique known as polling. In polling what we do is we send a GET request repeatedly after every fixed interval of time. So, what we do is from the POST request we get the url for the export task. You keep polling this task url until the state is either “FAILED” or “SUCCESS”. If it is a SUCCESS you append the download url somewhere in your website which can then clicked to download the archived export of the event.

 

Reference:

 

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