Deployment terms in Open Event Frontend

In Open Event Frontend, once a pull request is opened, we see some tests running on for the specific pull request like ‘Codacy’, ‘Codecov’, ‘Travis’, etc. New contributors eventually get confused what the tests are about. So this blog would be a walkthrough to these terms that we use and what they mean about the PR.

Travis: Everytime you make a pull request, you will see this test running and in some time giving the output whether the test passed or failed. Travis is the continuous integration test that we are using to test that the changes that the pull request you proposed does not break any other things. Sometimes you will see the following message which indicates that your changes is breaking something else which is not intended.

Thus, by looking at the Travis logs, you can see where the changes proposed in the pull request are breaking things. Thus, you can go ahead and correct the code and push again to run the Travis build until it passes.

Codacy: Codacy is being used to check the code style, duplication, complexity and coverage, etc. When you create a pull request or update the pull request, this test runs which checks whether the code followed certain style guide or if there is duplication in code, etc. For instance let’s say if your code has a html page in which a tag has an attribute which is left undefined. Then codacy will be throwing error failing the tests. Thus you need to see the logs and go correct the bug in code. The following message shows that the codacy test has passed.

Codecov:

Codecov is a code coverage test which indicates how much of the code change that is proposed in the pull request is actually executed. Consider out of the 100 lines of code that you wrote, only 80 lines is being actually executed and rest is not, then the code coverage decreases. The following indicates the codecov report.

Thus, it can be seen that which files are affected by what percent.

Surge:

The surge link is nothing but the deployment link of the changes in your pull request.

Thus, checking the link manually, we can test the behavior of the app in terms of UI/UX or the other features that the pull request adds.

References:

 

 

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Getting code coverage in a Nodejs project using Travis and CodeCov

We had set up unit tests on the webapp generator using mocha and chai, as I had blogged before.

But we also need to get coverage reports for each code commit and the overall state of the repo.

Since it is hosted on Github, Travis comes to our rescue. As you can see from our .travis.yml file, we already had Travis running to check for builds, and deploying to heroku.

Now to enable Codecov, simply go to http://codecov.io and enable your repository (You have to login with Github so see your Github repos) .

Once you do it, your dashboard should be visible like this https://codecov.io/github/fossasia/open-event-webapp

We use istanbul to get codecoverage. To try it out just use

istanbul cover _mocha

On the root of your project (where the /test/ folder is ) . That should generate a folder called coverage or lcov. Codecov can read lcov reports. They have provided a bash file which can be run to automatically upload coverage reports. You can run it like this –

bash <(curl -s https://codecov.io/bash)

Now go back to your codecov dashboard, and your coverage report should show up.

Screenshot from 2016-08-29 21-23-00

If all is well, we can integrate this with travis so that it happens on every code push. Add this to your travis.yml file.

script:
  - istanbul cover _mocha
after_success:
- bash <(curl -s https://codecov.io/bash)

This will ensure that on each push, we run coverage first. And if it is successful, we push the result to codecov.

We can see coverage file by file like this

Screenshot from 2016-08-29 21-23-35

And we can see coverage line by line in a file like this

Screenshot from 2016-08-29 21-26-55

 

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