Loklak Timeline Using Sphinx Extension In Yaydoc

In Yaydoc, I decided to add option, to show show the twitter timeline which showthe latest twitter feed. But I wanted to implement it using loklak instead of twitter embedded plugin. I started to search for an embedded plugin that exists for loklak. There is no such plugin, hence I built my own plugin. You can see the source code here.

Now that I have the plugin, the next phase is to add the plugin to the documentation. Adding the plugin by appending the plugin code to HTML is not viable. Therefore I decided to make Directive for Sphinx which adds a timeline based on the query parameter which user provides.

In order to make a Directive, I had to make a Sphinx extension which creates a timeline Directive. The Directive has to look like this

.. timeline :: fossasia

from docutils import nodes

from docutils.parsers import rst

class timeline(nodes.General, nodes.Element):
  pass

def visit(self, node):
  tag=u'''

”’

.format(node.display_name)
  self.body.append(tag)
  self.visit_admonition(node)

def depart(self, node):
  self.depart_admonition(node)

class TimelineDirective(rst.Directive):
  name = 'timeline'
  node_class = timeline
  has_content = True
  required_argument = 1
  optional_argument = 0
  final_argument_whitespace = False
  option_spec = {}

 def run(self):
    node = self.node_class()
    node.display_name = self.content[0]
    return [node]

def setup(app):            app.add_javascript("https://cdn.rawgit.com/fossasia/loklak-timeline-plugin/master/plugi
 n.js")
  app.add_node(timeline, html=(visit, depart))
  app.add_directive('timeline', TimelineDirective)

We have to create an empty class for Nodes that inherits`Node.General` and `Node.Elements`. This class is used for storing the value which will be passed by the directive.

I wrote a `Visit` function which executes when sphinx visits the `timeline` directive. `Visit` function basically appends the necessary html code needed to render the twitter timeline. Then I created TimelineDirective class which inherits rst.Directive. In that class, I defined a run method which read the argument from the directive and passed it to the node. Finally I defined a setup method which adds the loklak-timeline-plugin js to the render html node, and directive to the sphinx. Setup function has to be defined, in order to detect module as an extension by the sphinx.

Resources:

Showing Pull Request Build logs in Yaydoc

In Yaydoc, I added the feature to show build status of the Pull Request. But there was no way for the user to see the reason for build failure, hence I decided to show the build log in the Pull Request similar to that of TRAVIS CI. For this, I had to save the build log into the database, then use GitHub status API to show the build log url in the Pull Request which redirects to Yaydoc website where we render the build log.

StatusLog.storeLog(name, repositoryName, metadata,  `temp/[email protected]/generate_${uniqueId}.txt`, function(error, data) {
                            if (error) {
                              status = "failure";
                            } else {
                              targetBranch = `https://${process.env.HOSTNAME}/prstatus/${data._id}`
                            }
                            github.createStatus(commitId, req.body.repository.full_name, status, description, targetBranch, repositoryData.accessToken, function(error, data) {
                              if (error) {
                                console.log(error);
                              } else {
                                console.log(data);
                              }
                            });
                          });

In the above snippet, I’m storing the build log which is generated from the build script to the mongodb and I’m appending the mongodb unqiueID to the `prstatus` url so that we can use that id to retrieve build log from the database.

exports.createStatus = function(commitId, name, state, description, targetURL, accessToken, callback) {
  request.post({
    url: `https://api.github.com/repos/${name}/statuses/${commitId}`,
    headers: {
      'User-Agent': 'Yaydoc',
      'Authorization': 'token ' + crypter.decrypt(accessToken)
    },
    "content-type": "application/json",
    body: JSON.stringify({
      state: state,
      target_url: targetURL,
      description: description,
      context: "Yaydoc CI"
    })
  }, function(error, response, body) {
    if (error!== null) {
      return callback({description: 'Unable to create status'}, null);
    }
    callback(null, JSON.parse(body));
  });
};

After saving the build log, I’m sending the request to GitHub for showing the status of the build along with build log url where user can click the detail link and can see the build log.

Resources:

Showing Pull Request Build Status in Yaydoc

Yaydoc is integrated to various open source projects in FOSSASIA.  We have to make sure that the contributors PR should not break the build. So, I decided to check whether the PR is breaking the build or not. Then, I would notify the status of the build using GitHub status API.

exports.registerHook = function (data, accessToken) {
  return new Promise(function(resolve, reject) {
    var hookurl = 'http://' + process.env.HOSTNAME + '/ci/webhook';
    if (data.sub === true) {
      hookurl += `?sub=true`;
    }
    request({
      url: `https://api.github.com/repos/${data.name}/hooks`,
      headers: {
        'User-Agent': 'Yaydoc',
        'Authorization': 'token ' + crypter.decrypt(accessToken)
      },
      method: 'POST',
      json: {
        name: "web",
        active: true,
        events: [
          "push",
          "pull_request"
        ],
        config: {
          url: hookurl,
          content_type: "json"
        }
      }
    }, function(error, response, body) {
      if (response.statusCode !== 201) {
        console.log(response.statusCode + ': ' + response.statusMessage);
        resolve({status: false, body:body});
      } else {
        resolve({status: true, body: body});
      }
    });
  });
};

I’ll register the webhook, when user registers the repository to yaydoc for push and pull request event. Push event will be for building documentation and hosting the documentation to the GitHub pages. Pull_request event would be for checking the build of the pull request.

github.createStatus(commitId, req.body.repository.full_name, "pending", "Yaydoc is checking your build", repositoryData.accessToken, function(error, data) {
                    if (!error) {
                      var user = req.body.pull_request.head.label.split(":")[0];
                      var targetBranch = req.body.pull_request.head.label.split(":")[1];
                      var gitURL = `https://github.com/${user}/${req.body.repository.name}.git`;
                      var data = {
                        email: "[email protected]",
                        gitUrl: gitURL,
                        docTheme: "",
                        debug: true,
                        docPath: "",
                        buildStatus: true,
                        targetBranch: targetBranch
                      };
                      generator.executeScript({}, data, function(error, generatedData) {
                        var status, description;
                        if(error) {
                          status = "failure";
                          description = error.message;
                        } else {
                          status = "success";
                          description = generatedData.message;
                        }
                        github.createStatus(commitId, req.body.repository.full_name, status, description, repositoryData.accessToken, function(error, data) {
                          if (error) {
                            console.log(error);
                          } else {
                            console.log(data);
                          }
                       });
                 });
              }
        });

When anyone opens a new PR, GitHub will send  a request to yaydoc webhook. Then, I’ll send the status to GitHub saying that “Yaydoc is checking your build” with status `pending`. After, that I’ll documentation will be generated.Then, I’ll check the exit code. If the exit code is zero,  I’ll send the status `success` otherwise I’ll send `error` status.
Resources:

Deploying preview using surge in Yaydoc

In Yaydoc, we save the preview of the documentation in our local server and then we show the preview using express’s static serve method. But the problem is that Heroku doesn’t support persistent server, so our preview link gets expired within a few minutes. In order to solve the problem I planned to deploy the preview to surge so that the preview doesn’t get expired. For that I made a shell script which will deploy preview to the surge and then I’ll invoke the shell script using child_process.

#!/bin/bash

while getopts l:t:e:u: option
do
 case "${option}"
 in
 l) LOGIN=${OPTARG};;
 t) TOKEN=${OPTARG};;
 e) EMAIL=${OPTARG};;
 u) UNIQUEID=${OPTARG};;
 esac
done

export SURGE_LOGIN=${LOGIN}
export SURGE_TOKEN=${TOKEN}

./node_modules/.bin/surge --project temp/${EMAIL}/${UNIQUEID}_preview --domain ${UNIQUEID}.surge.sh

In the above snippet, I’m initializing the SURGE_LOGIN and SURGE_TOKEN environmental value, so that surge will deploy to the preview without asking any credentials while I am deploying the project. Then I’m executing surge by specifying the preview path and preview domain name.

exports.deploySurge = function(data, surgeLogin, surgeToken, callback) {
  var args = [
    "-l", surgeLogin,
    "-t", surgeToken,
    "-e", data.email,
    "-u", data.uniqueId
  ];

  var spawnedProcess = spawn('./surge_deploy.sh', args);
  spawnedProcess.on('exit', function(code) {
    if (code === 0) {
      callback(null, {description: 'Deployed successfully'});
    } else {
      callback({description: 'Unable to deploy'}, null);
    }
  });
}

Whenever the user generates documentation, I’ll invoke the shell script using child_process and then if it exits with exit code 0 I’ll pass the preview url via sockets to frontend and then the user can access the url.

Resource:

Scheduling Jobs to Check Expired Access Token in Yaydoc

In Yaydoc, we use the user access token to do various tasks like pushing documentation, registering webhook and to see it’s status.The user access token is very important to us, so I decided of adding Cron job which checks whether the user token has expired or not. But then one problem was that, if we have more number of users our cron job will send thousands of request at a time so it can break the app. So, I thought of queueing the process. I used `asyc` library for queuing the job.

const github = require("./github")
const queue = require("./queue")

User = require("../model/user");

exports.checkExpiredToken = function () {
  User.count(function (error, count) {
    if (error) {
      console.log(error);
    } else {
      var page = 0;
      if (count < 10) {
        page = 1;
      } else {
        page = count / 10;
        if (page * 10 < count) {
          page = (count + 10) /10;
        }
      }
      for (var i = 0; i <= page; i++) {
        User.paginateUsers(i, 10,
        function (error, users) {
          if (error) {
            console.log(error);
          } else {
            users.forEach(function(user) {
              queue.addTokenRevokedJob(user);
            })
          }
        })
      }
    }
  })
}

In the above code I’m paginating the list of users in the database and then I’m adding each user to the queue.

var tokenRevokedQueue = async.queue(function (user, done) {
  github.retriveUser(user.token, function (error, userData) {
    if (error) {
      if (user.expired === false) {
        mailer.sendMailOnTokenFailure(user.email);
        User.updateUserById(user.id, {
          expired: true
        }, function(error, data) {
          if (error) {
            console.log(error);
          }
        });
      }
      done();
    } else {
      done();
    }
  })
}, 2);

I made this queue with the help of async queue method. In the first parameter, I’m passing the logic and in second parameter, I’m passing how many jobs can be executed asynchronously. I’m checking if the user has revoked the token or not by sending API requests to GitHub’s user API. If it gives a response ‘200’ then the token is valid otherwise it’s invalid. If the user token is invalid, I’m sending email to the user saying that “Your access token in revoked so Sign In once again to continue the service”.

Resources:

Implementing Search Bar Using GitHub API In Yaydoc CI

In Yaydoc’s, documentation will be generated by typing the URL of the git repository to the input box from where user can generate documentation for any public repository, they can see the preview and if they have access, they can push the documentation to the github pages on one click. But In Yaydoc CI user can register the repository only if he has access to the specific repository, so I decided to show the list to the repository where user can select from the list but then it also has one problem that Github won’t give us all the user repository data in one api hit and then I made a search bar in which user can search repository and can register to the Yaydoc CI.

var search = function () {
  var username = $("#orgs").val().split(":")[1];
  const searchBarInput = $("#search_bar");
  const searchResultDiv = $("#search_result");

  searchResultDiv.empty();
  if (searchBarInput.val() === "") {
    searchResultDiv.append('<p class="text-center">Please enter the repository name<p>');
    return;
  }

  searchResultDiv.append('<p class="text-center">Fetching data<p>');

  $.get(`https://api.github.com/search/repositories?q=user:${username}+fork:true+${searchBarInput.val()}`, function (result) {
    searchResultDiv.empty();
    if (result.total_count === 0) {
      searchResultDiv.append(`<p class="text-center">No results found<p>`);
      styles.disableButton("btnRegister");
    } else {
      styles.disableButton("btnRegister");
      var select = '<label class="control-label" for="repositories">Repositories:</label>';
      select += '<select class="form-control" id="repositories" name="repository" required>';
      select += `<option value="">Please select</option>`;
      result.items.forEach(function (x){
        select += `<option value="${x.full_name}">${x.full_name}</option>`;
      });
      select += '</select>';
      searchResultDiv.append(select);
    }
  });
};

$(function() {
  $("#search").click(function () {
    search();
  });
});

In the above snippet I have defined search function which will get executed when user clicks the search button. The search function will get the search query from input box, if the search query is empty it’ll show the message as “Please enter repository name”, if it is not empty it’ll hit the GitHub API to fetch user repositories. If the GitHub returns empty array it’ll show “No results found”. In between searching time “Fetching data” will be shown.

$('#search_bar').on('keyup keypress', function(e) {
    var keyCode = e.keyCode || e.which;
    if (keyCode === 13) {
      search();
    }
  });

  $('#ci_register').on('keyup keypress', function(e) {
    var keyCode = e.keyCode || e.which;
    if (keyCode === 13) {
      e.preventDefault();
      return false;
    }
  });

Still we faced some problem, like on click enter button form is automatically submitting. So I’m registering event listener. In that listener I’m checking whether the key code is 13 or not. Key code 13 represent enter key, so if the key code is 13 then i’ll prevent the form from submitting. You can see the working of the search bar in the Yaydoc CI.

Resources:

Testing Deploy Functions Using Sinon.JS in Yaydoc

In yaydoc, we deploy the generated documentation to the GitHub pages as well as Heroku. It is one of the important functions in the source code. I don’t want to break the build in future by any unnoticed change, so I decided to write a test case for deploy function. But the deploy function had lot dependencies like child processes, sockets, etc. Also it is not a pure function, so there is no return object to assert the value. Then I decided to stub for child process to check whether the correct script was passed or not. In order to write stub I decided to use sinon js framework because it can be used for writing stubs, mocks and spies. One of the advantages with sinon is that it’ll work with any testing framework.

sinon.stub(require("child_process"), "spawn").callsFake(function (fileName, args) {
  if (fileName !== "./ghpages_deploy.sh" ) {
    throw new Error(`invalid ${fileName} invoked`);
  }

  if (fileName === "./ghpages_deploy.sh") {
    let ghArgs = ["-e", "-i", "-n", "-o", "-r"];
    ghArgs.forEach(function (x)  {
      if (args.indexOf(x) < 0) {
        throw new Error(`${x} argument is not passed`);
      }
    })
  }
 
  let process = {
    on: function (listenerId, callback) {
      if (listenerId !== "exit") {
        throw new Error("listener id is not exit");
      }
    }
  }
  return process;
});

In sinon you can create s stub by passing the object in the first parameter and the method name in the second parameter to sinon’s stub method. After it returns an object, pass the function which you would like to replace with the “callFakes” function.

In above code, I wrote a simple stub which overwrites NodeJS child_process’s spawn method. So I passed the “child_process” module in the first parameter and “spawn” method name in the second parameter. You must check whether they are passing the correct deploy script and the correct parameter. So, I wrote a function which checks the condition and then pass the method to the callFakes method.

describe('deploy script', function() {
  it("gh-pages deploy", function() {
    deploy.deployPages(fakeSocket, {
      gitURL: "https://github.com/sch00lb0y/yaydoc.git",
      encryptedToken: crypter.encrypt("dummykey"),
      email: "[email protected]",
      uniqueId: "ajshdahsdh",
      username: "fossasia"
    });
  });
});

Finally test the deploy function by calling it. I use mocha as a testing framework. I have already written a blog on mocha. If you’re interested in mocha please check out this blog.

Resources:

Continuous Integration in Yaydoc using GitHub webhook API

In Yaydoc,  Travis is used for pushing the documentation for each and every commit. But this leads us to rely on a third party to push the documentation and also in long run it won’t allow us to implement new features, so we decided to do the continuous documentation pushing on our own. In order to build the documentation for each and every commit we have to know when the user is pushing code. This can be achieved by using GitHub webhook API. Basically we have to register our api to specific GitHub repository, and then GitHub will send a POST request to our API on each and every commit.

“auth/ci” handler is used to get access of the user. Here we request user to give access to Yaydoc such as accessing the public repositories , read organization details and write permission to write webhook to the repository and also I maintaining state by keeping the ci session as true so that I can know that this callback is for gh-pages deploy or ci deployOn

On callback I’m keeping the necessary informations like username, access_token, id and email in session. Then based on ci session state, I’m redirecting to the appropriate handler. In this case I’m redirecting to “ci/register”.After redirecting to the “ci/register”, I’m getting all the public repositories using GitHub API and then I’m asking the users to choose the repository on which users want to integrate Yaydoc CI

After redirecting to the “ci/register”, I’m getting all the public repositories using GitHub API and then I’m asking the users to choose the repository on which users want to integrate Yaydoc CI

router.post('/register', function (req, res, next) {
      request({
        url: `https://api.github.com/repos/${req.session.username}/${repositoryName}/hooks?access_token=${req.session.token}`,
        method: 'POST',
        json: {
          name: "web",
          active: true,
          events: [
            "push"
          ],
          config: {
            url: process.env.HOSTNAME + '/ci/webhook',
            content_type: "json"
          }
        }
      }, function(error, response, body) {
        repositoryModel.newRepository(req.body.repository,
          req.session.username,
          req.session.githubId,
          crypter.encrypt(req.session.token),
          req.session.email)
          .then(function(result) {
            res.render("index", {
              showMessage: true,
              messages: `Thanks for registering with Yaydoc.Hereafter Documentation will be pushed to the GitHub pages on each commit.`
            })
          })
      })
    }
  })

After user choose the repository, they will send a POST request to “ci/register” and then I’m registering the webhook to the repository and I’m saving the repository, user details in the database, so that it can be used when GitHub send request to push the documentation to the GitHub Pages.

router.post('/webhook', function(req, res, next) {
  var event = req.get('X-GitHub-Event')
  if (event == 'Push') {
      repositoryModel.findOneRepository(
        {
          githubId: req.body.repository.owner.id,
          name: req.body.repository.name
        }
      ).
      then(function(result) {
        var data = {
          email: result.email,
          gitUrl: req.body.repository.clone_url,
          docTheme: "",
        }
        generator.executeScript({}, data, function(err, generatedData) {
            deploy.deployPages({}, {
              email: result.email,
              gitURL: req.body.repository.clone_url,
              username: result.username,
              uniqueId: generatedData.uniqueId,
              encryptedToken: result.accessToken
            })
        })
      })
      res.json({
        status: true
      })
   }
})

After you register on webhook, GitHub will send a request to the url which we registered on the repository. In our case “https:/yaydoc.herokuapp.com/ci/auth” is the url. The type of the event can be known by reading ‘X-GitHub-Event’ header. Right now I’m registering only for the push event. So we’ll only be getting the push event. GitHub also gives us the repository details in the request body.

When the user makes a commit to the repository, GitHub will send a POST request to the Yaydoc’s server. Then, we’ll get the repository name and Github’s user ID from the request body. By use of this, I’ll retrieve the access token from the database which we already registered while the user registers the repository to the CI. The documentation will be generated using generate script and pushed to GitHub pages using deploy script.

Now Yaydoc generates documentation on every push when the user commits to the repository and also it will enable us to integrate new features in our own custom environment. We also plan to build a full featured CI platform.

Resources:

Generating responsive email using mjml in Yaydoc

In Yaydoc, an email with a download, preview and deploy link will be sent to the user after documentation is generated. But then initially, Yaydoc was sending email in plain text without any styling, so I decided to make an attractive HTML email template for it. The problem with HTML email is adding custom CSS and making it responsive, because the emails will be seen on various devices like mobile, tablet and desktops. When going through the GitHub trending list, I came across mjml and was totally stunned by it’s capabilities. Mjml is a responsive email generation framework which is built using React (popular front-end framework maintained by Facebook)

Install mjml to your system using npm.

npm init -y && npm install mjml

Then add mjml to your path

export PATH="$PATH:./node_modules/.bin”

Mjml has a lot of react components pre-built for creating the responsive email. For example mj-text, mj-image, mj-section etc…

Here I’m sharing the snippet used for generating email in Yaydoc.

<mjml>
  <mj-head>
    <mj-attributes>
      <mj-all padding="0" />
      <mj-class name="preheader" color="#CB202D" font-size="11px" font-family="Ubuntu, Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif" padding="0" />
    </mj-attributes>
    <mj-style inline="inline">
      a { text-decoration: none; color: inherit; }
 
    </mj-style>
  </mj-head>
  <mj-body>
    <mj-container background-color="#ffffff">
 
      <mj-section background-color="#CB202D" padding="10px 0">
        <mj-column>
          <mj-text align="center" color="#ffffff" font-size="20px" font-family="Lato, Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif" padding="18px 0px">Hey! Your documentation generated successfully<i class="fa fa-address-book-o" aria-hidden="true"></i>
 
          </mj-text>
        </mj-column>
      </mj-section>
      <mj-section background-color="#ffffff" padding="20px 0">
        <mj-column>
          <mj-image src="http://res.cloudinary.com/template-gdg/image/upload/v1498552339/play_cuqe89.png" width="85px" padding="0 25px">
</mj-image>
 
          <mj-text align="center" color="#EC652D" font-size="20px" font-family="Lato, Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif" vertical-align="top" padding="20px 25px">
            <strong><a>Preview it</a></strong>
            <br />
          </mj-text>
        </mj-column>
        <mj-column>
          <mj-image src="http://res.cloudinary.com/template-gdg/image/upload/v1498552331/download_ktlqee.png" width="100px" padding="0 25px" >
        </mj-image>
          <mj-text align="center" color="#EC652D" font-size="20px" font-family="Lato, Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif" vertical-align="top" padding="20px 25px">
            <strong><a>Download it</a></strong>
            <br />
          </mj-text>
        </mj-column>
        <mj-column>
          <mj-image src="http://res.cloudinary.com/template-gdg/image/upload/v1498552325/deploy_yy3oqw.png" width="100px" padding="0px 25px" >
        </mj-image>
          <mj-text align="center" color="#EC652D" font-size="20px" font-family="Lato, Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif" vertical-align="top" padding="20px 25px">
 
            <strong><a>Deploy it</a></strong>
            <br />
          </mj-text>
        </mj-column>
      </mj-section>
      <mj-section background-color="#333333" padding="10px">
        <mj-column>
        <mj-text align="center" color="#ffffff" font-size="20px" font-family="Lato, Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif" padding="18px 0px">Thanks for using Yaydoc<i class="fa fa-address-book-o" aria-hidden="true"></i>
        </mj-column>
        </mj-text>
      </mj-section>
    </mj-container>
  </mj-body>
</mjml>

The main goal of this example is to make a responsive email which looks like the image given below. So, In mj-head tag, I have imported all the necessary fonts using the mj-class tag and wrote my custom CSS in mj-style. Then I made a container with one row and one column using mj-container, mj-section and mj-column tag and changed the container background color to #CB202D using background-color attribute, then In that container I wrote a heading which says `Hey! Your documentation generated successfully`  with mj-text tag, Then you will get the red background top bar with the success message. Then moving on to the second part, I made a container with three columns and added one image to each column using mj-image tag by specifying image URL as src attribute, added the corresponding text below the mj-image tag using the mj-text tag. At last,  I  made one more container as the first one with different message saying `Thanks for using yaydoc`  with background color #333333

At last, transpile your mjml code to HTML by executing the following command.

mjml -r index.mjml -o index.html

Rendered Email
Resources:

Testing child process using Mocha in Yaydoc

Mocha is a javascript testing framework. It can be used in both nodeJS and browser as well, also it is one of the most popular testing framework available out there. Mocha is widely used for the Behavior Driven Development (BDD). In yaydoc, we are using mocha to test our web UI. One of the main task in yaydoc is documentation generation. We build a bash script to do our documentation generation. We run the bash script using node’s child_process module, but then in order to run the test you have to execute the child process before test execution. This can be achieved by mochas’s before hook. Install mocha in to your system

npm install -g mocha

Here is the test case which i wrote in yaydoc test file.

const assert = require('assert')
const spawn = require('child_process').spawn
const uuidV4 = require("uuid/v4")
describe('WebUi Generator', () => {
  let uniqueId = uuidV4()
  let email = '[email protected].com'
  let args = [
    "-g", "https://github.com/fossasia/yaydoc.git",
    "-t", "alabaster",
    "-m", email,
    "-u", uniqueId,
    "-w", "true"
  ]
  let exitCode

  before((done) => {
    let process = spawn('./generate.sh', args)
    process.on('exit', (code) => {
      exitCode = code
      done()
    })
  })
  it('exit code should be zero', () => {
    assert.equal(exitCode, 0)
  })
 })

Describe() function is used to describe our test case. In our scenario we’re testing the generate script so we write as webui generator. As I mentioned above we have to run our child_process in before hook. It() function is the place where we write our test case. If the test case fails, an error will be thrown. We use the assert module from mocha to do the assertion. You can see our assertion in first it()  block for checking exit code is zero or not.

mocha test.js --timeout 1500000

Since documentation takes time so we have to mention time out while running mocha. If your test case passes successfully, you will get output similar to this.

WebUi Generator
    ✓ exit code should be zero

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