FOSSASIA Summit 2018 Singapore – Call for Speakers

The FOSSASIA Open Tech Summit is Asia’s leading Open Technology conference for developers, companies, and IT professionals. The event will take place from Thursday, 22nd – Sunday, 25th March at the Lifelong Learning Institute in Singapore.

During four days developers, technologists, scientists, and entrepreneurs convene to collaborate, share information and learn about the latest in open technologies, including Artificial Intelligence software, DevOps, Cloud Computing, Linux, Science, Hardware and more. The theme of this year’s event is “Towards the Open Conversational Web“.

For our feature event we are looking for speaker submissions about Open Source for the following areas:

  • Artificial Intelligence, Algorithms, Search Engines, Cognitive Experts
  • Open Design, Hardware, Imaging
  • Science, Tech and Education
  • Kernel and Platform
  • Database
  • Cloud, Container, DevOps
  • Internet Society and Community
  • Open Event Solutions
  • Security and Privacy
  • Open Source in Business
  • Blockchain

There will be special events celebrating the 20th anniversary of the Open Source Initiative and its impact in Open Source business. An exhibition space is available for company and project stands.

Submission Guidelines

Please propose your session as early as possible and include a description of your session proposal that is as complete as possible. The description is of particular importance for the selection. Once accepted, speakers will receive a code for a speakers ticket. Speakers will receive a free speakers ticket and two standard tickets for their partner or friends. Sessions are accepted on an ongoing basis.

Submission Link: 2018.fossasia.org/speaker-registration

Dates & Deadlines

Please send us your proposal as soon as possible via the FOSSASIA Summit speaker registration.

Deadline for submissions: December 27th, 2017

Late submissions: Later submissions are possible, but early submissions have priority

Notification of acceptance: On an ongoing basis

Schedule Announced: January 20, 2018

FOSSASIA Open Tech Summit: March 22nd – 25th, 2018

Sessions and Tracks

Talks and Workshops

Talk slots are 20 minutes long plus 5-10 minutes for questions and answers. The idea is, that participants will use the sessions to get an idea of the work of others and are able to follow up in more detail in break-out areas, where they discuss more and start to work together. Speakers can also sign up for either a 1-hour long or a 2-hours workshop sessions. Longer sessions are possible in principle. Please tell us the proposed length of your session at the time of submission.

Lightning talks

You have some interesting ideas but do not want to submit a full talk? We suggest you go for a lightning talk which is a 5 minutes slot to present your idea or project. You are welcome to continue the discussion in breakout areas. There are tables and chairs to serve your get-togethers.

Stands and assemblies

We offer spaces in our exhibition area for companies, projects, installations, team gatherings and other fun activities. We are curious to know what you would like to make, bring or show. Please add details in the submission form.

Developer Rooms/Track Hosts

Get in touch early if you plan to organize a developer room at the event. FOSSASIA is also looking for team members who are interested to co-host and moderate tracks. Please sign up to become a host here.

Publication

Audio and video recordings of the lectures will be published in various formats under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) license. This license allows commercial use by media institutions as part of their reporting. If you do not wish for material from your lecture to be published or streamed, please let us know in your submission.

Sponsorship & Contact

If you would like to sponsor FOSSASIA or have any questions, please contact us via [email protected].

Suggested Topics

  • Artificial Intelligence (SUSI.AI, Algorithms, Cognitive Expert Systems AI on a Chip)
  • Hardware (Architectures, Maker Culture, Small Devices)
  • 20 years Impact of Open Source in Business
  • DevOps (Continuous Delivery, Lean IT, Moving at Cloud-speed)
  • Networking (Software Defined Networking, OpenFlow, Satellite Communication)
  • Security (Coding, Configuration, Testing, Malware)
  • Cloud & Microservices (Containers – Libraries, Runtimes, Composition; Kubernetes; Docker, Distributed Services)
  • Databases (Location-aware and Mapping, Replication and Clustering, Data Warehousing, NoSQL)
  • Science and Applications (Pocket Science Lab, Neurotech, Biohacking, Science Education)
  • Business Development (Open Source Business Models, Startups, Kickstarter Campaigns)
  • Internet of Everything (Smart Home, Medical Systems, Environmental Systems)
  • Internet Society and Culture (Collaborative Development, Community, Advocacy, Government, Governance, Legal)​
  • Kernel Development and Linux On The Desktop (Meilix, Light Linux systems, Custom Linux Generator)
  • Open Design and Libre Art (Open Source Design)
  • Open Event (Event Management systems, Ticketing solutions, Scheduling, Event File Formats)

Links

Speaker Registration and Proposal Submission:
2018.fossasia.org/speaker-registration

FOSSASIA Summit: 2018.fossasia.org

FOSSASIA Summit 2017: Event Wrap-Up

FOSSASIA Photos: flickr.com/photos/fossasia/

FOSSASIA Videos: Youtube FOSSASIA

FOSSASIA on Twitter: twitter.com/fossasia

Join Codeheat Coding Contest 2017

Codeheat is a coding contest for developers interested in contributing to Open Source software and hardware projects at FOSSASIA.  Join development of real world software applications, build up your developer profile, learn new new coding skills, collaborate with the community and make new friends from around the world! Sign up for #CodeHeat here now and follow Codeheat on Twitter.

The contest runs until 1st February 2018. All FOSSASIA projects take part in Codeheat including:

Grand prize winners will be invited to present their work at the FOSSASIA OpenTechSummit in Singapore from March 23rd -25th 2018 and will get 600 SGD in travel funding to attend, plus a free speaker ticket and beautiful Swag.

Our jury will choose three winners from the top 10 contributors according to code quality and relevance of commits for the project. The jury also takes other contributions like submitted weekly scrum reports and monthly technical blog posts into account, but of course awesome code is the most important item on the list.

Other participants will have the chance to win Tshirts, Swag and vouchers to attend Open Tech events in the region and will get certificates of participation.

codeheat-logo

Team mentors and jury members from 10 different countries support participants of the contest.

Participants should take the time to read through the contest FAQ and familiarize themselves with the introductory information and Readme.md of each project before starting to work on an issue.

Developers interested in the contest can also contact mentors through project channels on the FOSSASIA gitter.

Additional Links

Website: codeheat.org

Codeheat Twitter: twitter.com/codeheat_

Codeheat Facebook: facebook.com/codeheat.org

Participating Projects: All FOSSASIA Repositories on GitHub at github.com/fossasia

Open Source Developer Guide and Best Practices at FOSSASIA

I would request you to please guide me as to how can I collaborate with you and also how can I contribute effectively to the organization.

At times I might get up to 20 private mails per day about “How to contribute to Open Source”. Usually I will direct developers to our mailing list or chat channels if they are asking about a specific project. But, how do contributions work at FOSSASIA? How can new developers join projects effectively? We have tried many different ways and spent a lot of time communicating with newcomers, many of them new to Git and Open Source development.

Over the years we have gotten better at helping new developers, designers and other contributors to join up. We have more than 1300 registered developers in our GitHub organization today. Not all of them can contribute every day, but we do have thousands of commits every year.

So, how are we able to scale up? I believe one reason are our Best Practices. We didn’t have a document “FOSSASIA Best Practices” yet, but in our daily work we have established excellent (mostly unwritten) best practices, that I would like to share in a concise form here now as a reference for new developers.

Happy to get your feedback and comments.

Development Best Practices at FOSSASIA

Culture and Communication

  • Please adapt your language to non-native English speakers and be super friendly. Remember we are an international community with contributors mainly from Asia and Europe. We are not used to swearing and will mostly understand words literally. At all times ensure your tone stays appropriate and friendly in the FOSSASIA community.
  • Stay modest. Sometimes newcomers already have an amazing knowledge in some areas. Still remember, it is no reason to be arrogant. Even the best developer does not know everything.
  • Be nice and welcoming. Why not add “please” in an issue or a comment “Thank you” in a pull request if someone did a good job? Show your appreciation for the good work of your co-developers.
  • If you are involved in a topic you don’t understand yet, try to learn yourself as much as possible from public channels (wikipedia, stackoverflow) but also do not hesitate to ask questions to other developers.

Communication Channels

Every project at FOSSASIA has its own channels. Many projects use Gitter, some Slack or IRC. Usually you will find information of the main communication channels of a project in the Readme.md.

While we are a community of Open Source and Free Software developers we still reserve our right to use whatever tools we deem necessary to help us to achieve our goal of developing the best possible Open Technologies – software and hardware. It is one step at a time 🙂

Private and Public Chat or Issue Tracker

Chat is a great way to connect with other contributors, but not all contributors are there all the time (consider time difference and personal schedules) and they are not always available to chat. Chat tends to be unstructured and with lots of people in a room there are often a number of threads. Therefore chat is great for help on setup issues and things where you got stuck.

Do not use chat for feature requests and detailed discussions on issues. These things are best for the issue tracker, where people from different timezones can join and where a focused conversation on one specific topic can happen.

Some people try to overcome the unstructured chats by switching to private communication. This shuts out other contributors who might have similar issues. A result I often observed is also, that contributors will bring up arguments in discussions like “I have discussed this already with xyz privately and he agrees”. Other contributors have not seen this discussion if it has not been taken place in public and we haven’t seen the arguments. We don’t know if xyz really agrees or if it was misunderstood. Private conversations are not transparent. Surely, there are cases where private chat is needed, e.g. for specific deployment questions of projects, but whenever you talk about development, please switch to public chat or open an issue.

Feature Requests and Bug Reports

  • Some newcomers are not accustomed to issue trackers and might try to inform developers on the mailing list, chat or even write private emails about bugs and features, but the right place to do this is: The issue tracker of a project.
  • Any bug or feature, please open an issue in the issue tracker right away and indicate if you want to work on it yourself.
  • Please include all relevant information when you submit an issue and wherever possible a link, information about the code that has issues and a screenshot.
  • When you file a bug report on the issue tracker, make sure you add steps to reproduce it. Especially if that bug is some weird/rare one.

Join Development

  • Before you join development, please set up the project on your local machine, run it and go through the application completely. Press on any button you can find and see where it leads to. Explore. (Don’t worry. Nothing will happen to the app or to you due to the exploring. Only thing that will happen is, you’ll be more familiar with what is where and might even get some cool ideas on how to improve various aspects of the app.).
  • If you would like to work on an issue, drop in a comment at the issue. If it is already assigned to someone, but there is no sign of any work being done, please free to drop in a comment so that the issue can be assigned to you if the previous assignee has dropped it entirely.

Commits/Pull Requests

  • All pull requests need to be associated to an issue.
  • All PRs need to be assigned to the person working on it.
  • If an issue cannot be completed in less than a day, it should be broken up into multiple issues.
  • Make pull requests from your own forks (even if you have write rights to the repository, do not create new branches, develop on your own branches).
  • State the actual change or enhancement in the commit message of PRs (do not just state “Fixes issue #123”).
  • Add the issue number into the description (this helps to speed up reviews as reviewers can simply click to get more info in the issue itself).
  • Write clear meaningful git commit messages (Do read http://chris.beams.io/posts/git-commit/).
  • Match pull requests with issues and make sure your pull requests description contains GitHub’s special keyword references that automatically close the related issue when the pull request is merged. (More info at https://github.com/blog/1506-closing-issues-via-pull-requests).
  • When you make very minor changes to a pull request of yours (like for example fixing a failing travis build or some small style corrections or minor changes requested by reviewers) make sure you squash your commits afterwards so that you don’t have an absurd number of commits for a very small fix (Learn how to squash at https://davidwalsh.name/squash-commits-git).
  • Add a screenshot if you changed anything in the UI of a project. When you’re submitting a pull request for a UI-related issue, please add a screenshot of your change or a link to a deployment where it can be tested out along with your pull request. It makes it much easier for the reviewers and helps to speed up the process. You’ll also get reviews quicker.
  • Add a link to your deployment of the project, where reviewers can check out what you have changed (especially for smaller changes this is very helpful as the reviewer might not even need to set up the system itself and test it. Again this speeds up the review process a lot).
  • Always ensure CI and tests are successful.
  • Help to resolve merge conflicts (especially if there are several PRs at the same time, merge conflicts are common. Help the reviewers and solve merge conflicts to speed up the process.).
  • Merging Pull Requests should only happen if at least two contributors reviewed the PR and approved it.

Scope of Issues and Commits

  • Stay focused on the issue and its specifics: Sometimes it is tempting to do more changes in a pull request and simply add a nice little feature after mentioning it in the issue tracker. Please do not do this. Contributors will look at the title of issues usually to check if it is relevant for them. For example, if an issue is about changing a font, do not also change the color even if this seems like small change to you. Many projects have a design template and standard colors etc. that they want to achieve. So your changes might need to be discussed in a bigger setting even if they seem small to you. Same applies to many other areas.
  • Do only the changes in a pull request that are mentioned in the issue. Do not change anything else without ever mentioning it (remember match issues with pull requests).

Branch Policies

Most FOSSASIA Projects have:

  • a development branch (which is the working branch. Please commit to this branch.) and
  • a master branch (which is the stable branch).

Some projects also keep additional branches e.g.:

  • gh-pages for documentation purposes (often autogenerated from md-files in docs folder)
  • apk branches for Android apps (often autogenerated with travis).

Getting Started

  • Newcomers are sometimes afraid to make a pull request. Don’t be! It is the responsibility of reviewers to review them. And Git is a beautiful tool when it comes to reverting pull requests with errors.
  • In simple issues keep it simple and “simply” contribute, e.g. in an issue “change the color of the button from green to red”, there is no need to mention and ask “here is a screenshot where I changed the color to red. Should I make a PR now?”. Just make the pull request and wait for the feedback of the reviewer.
  • Take on responsibility early and help to review other contributions. Even though you do not have write access in a repository you can already help to review other commits.

Documentation

  • Please ensure you provide information about your code and the functioning of your app as part of every code contribution.
  • Add information on technologies and the code into the code itself and into documentation files e.g. into the Readme.md or /docs folder. Documentation is not a thing that should be done at the end after a few weeks or months of coding! Documentation is a continuous effort at every step of software development.
  • If you add new libraries or technologies add information about them into the Readme file.
  • If you implement a different design or change the css in a web project, please add information to the design specifications/template. If there are not any design specifications in the project yet, why not start them and add a section into the Readme.md to start with?
  • Always help to keep documentation up to date and make it easy for new contributors to join the project.

 

Thank you for helping to define many of the practices while working on the Open Event project to the developer team and for additional input and links to Niranjan Rajendran.

Links to Other Resources

Code Heat Coding Contest

In the Heat of the Code is a coding contest supported by the UNESCO to involve new contributors in Open Source projects. Participating projects are:

1. The Open Event Orga Server using Python/flask.
2. The AskSusi repositories with a focus on the Susi Android App and Susi Messenger Bots, and
3. The loklak repositories with a focus on loklak search with AngularJS.

The contest runs until 3rd February 2017. Grand prize winners will be invited to present their work at the FOSSASIA Summit at the Science Centre Singapore from March 17th -19th 2017 and will get up to 450 USD in travel funding to attend, plus a free speaker ticket.

codeheat-logo

Our jury will choose three winners from the top 10 contributors according to code quality and relevance of commits for the project. The jury also takes other contributions like submitted scrum reports and technical blog posts into account, but of course awesome code is the most important item on the list. Other participants will have the chance to win vouchers to attend Open Tech events in the region and will get certificates of participation. Sign up here now.

A team of over 30 mentors and jury members from 10 different countries supports participants of the contest.

Participants should take the time to read through the contest FAQ and familiarize themselves with the introductory information and Readme.md of each project before starting work on an issue.

The website codeheat.org has a list of questions and answers. Developers interested in the contest can also contact mentors on our Slack channel [Get a Slack Invite].

If you make at least four commits labeled “hacktoberfest” before 31st October you can also win a Hacktoberfest T-shirt (additional sign up required here).

FOSSASIA Hack Trip to 32C3 Chaos Communication Congress

From December 27-30 the 32C3 Chaos Communication Congress took place in Hamburg, Germany. Members of the FOSSASIA community met at the event to learn about the latest OpenTech hacks. We used the opportunity to work with mentors on our coding program for kids. See photos from our gathering here.


Get together at 32C3 Hamburg

Mitch Altman at Chaos Communication Congress 32C3 with Hong Phuc Dang from FOSSASIAHong Phuc Dang meeting Mitch Altman (Twitter)

FOSSASIA Mentors Michael Christen (Yacy), Jan Suhr (Nitrokey), Hong Phuc DangMeetup with FOSSASIA mentors and supporters from Europe Michael Christen (Yacy.net/loklak), Jan Suhr (Nitrokey), Hong Phuc Dang (FOSSASIA), Anna (Mozilla)

Kids Coding with FOSSASIA and Google Code-In

After the successful Google Summer of Code we are very happy and honored to participate for the second year in Google Code-In. The contest introduces pre-university students (ages 13-17) to open source software development and runs from December 7 2015 until January 25, 2016. Learn more here.

Because Google Code-in is often the first experience many students have with open source, the contest is designed to make it easy for students to jump right in. Open source organizations chosen by Google provide a list of tasks for students to work on during the seven week contest period. A unique part of the contest is that each task has mentors from the organization assigned should students have questions or need help along the way.

Google Code-In FOSSASIA

How to join the FOSSASIA Community

We often get the question, how can I join the community. There is no official membership form to fill out in order to participate in the Open Tech Community. You simply start to contribute to our projects on GitHub and you are already a member. So, let’s work together to develop to develop social software for everyone!

The FOSSASIA team welcomes contributors and supporters to Free and Open Source Software. Become a developer, a documentation writer, packaging maintainer, tester, user supporter, blogger or organize events and meetups about our projects.

Women in IT discussion in the community

Here are some ideas how we can collaborate

Download our Open Source applications, install them and use them

The first step of joining a project is always to download the software and try it out. The best motivation to support a project is, if the project is useful for yourself. Check out our many projects on github.com/fossasia and our project social media Open Source search engine on github.com/loklak.

Show your support and ★star FOSSASIA projects

Help to motivate existing contributors and show your support of FOSSASIA projects on GitHub. Star projects and fork them. Doing something that people like and that helps people is a great motivation for many.

Learn about best practices

We have formulated best practices for contributing to Open Source to help new contributors to get started. Please read them carefully. Understanding our best practices will help you to collaborate with the community and ensure your code gets merged more quickly.

Subscribe to news

Subscribe to the FOSSASIA Newsletter to stay up to date on new software releases, events and coding programs here on the main page.

Read the blogs and support users on the mailing list

Learn from Open Tech articles on our blog that are written by developers, contributors, volunteers, and staff of companies supporting the FOSSASIA network. Sign up for the FOSSASIA Mailing List and keep reading our blog at blog.fossasia.org.

Follow us on Social Media

Show us you interest in FOSSASIA’s Open Technology and keep up to date on new developments by following us on Twitter and retweeting important updates: twitter.com/fossasia

And, become a member on social networks like Google+ and Facebook and connect with other contributors:
* Facebook www.facebook.com/fossasia/
* Google+ plus.google.com/108920596016838318216

Join and support the FOSSASIA network at community events

Set up a booth or a table about FOSSASIA at Open Source community events! There are many events of the open source community all over the world. The core team of FOSSASIA is simply not able to attend all events. You can support the cause by making the project visible. Register as a member of the FOSSASIA community at events, set up an info point and showcase Free and Open Source projects. Check out for example our meetup group in Singapore: meetup.com/FOSSASIA-Singapore-Open-Technology-Meetup/

Translate our projects and their documentation

Do you speak more than one language? Most Open Tech projects are 100% volunteer translated, which means you can be part of a translation team translating software and documentation thousands of people will use. Start now and check out our GitHub repository.

Mini Debconf Participants in Saigon

Richard Stallman from the Free Software Foundation and Hong Phuc Dang at the 31c3 Chaos Communication Congress in Hamburg

Richard Stallman FOSSASIA's Hong Phuc Dang, Free Software and Open SourceRichard Stallman (Free Software Foundation) and FOSSASIA‘s Hong Phuc Dang,

Richard Stallman and Hong Phuc Dang met at the 31c3 Chaos Communication Congress in Hamburg. Richard Matthew Stallman (RMS) is the founder of the GNU Project and the Free Software Foundation. Hong Phuc started the FOSSASIA community in 2009. The meeting during the “Congress” was a unique chance to discuss the progress of freedom and software in Asia.

“It is great to get Richard’s views on the development of software in Asia and learn about his ideas about Open Source and Free Software. I hope we will follow up soon about new projects and see more cooperation between the Free Software Foundation and the FOSSASIA community.”

A focus that is becoming more and more interesting is hardware and FashionTec development. One of the exciting projects taking place are knitting machines with a completely open design that are freely licensed. Richard advised to use the label “Free Hardware Design” modeled after “Free Software” for such projects.

Links:

Richard Stallman in the Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Stallman

Personal Website: https://www.stallman.org

Blog on the FSF: http://www.fsf.org/blogs/rms/

Free Software Foundation: http://www.fsf.org

FashionTec: http://fashiontec.org

Meetup of Beijing Linux User Group with Dang Hong Phuc from FOSSASIA

Hong Phuc Dang FOSSASIA, Women in IT Asia

Please join our FOSSASIA Bejinglug meetup with Dang Hong Phuc in Bejing, China on December 6, 2015. Hong Phuc will give insights about the FOSSASIA network, the programs of FOSSASIA and the FOSSASIA summit 2015 in Singapore.

FOSSASIA runs contributors, Open Source developers and hardware maker programs in cooperations with companies and communities such as Google Summer of Code and Google Code-In (current Code-In program until January 19).

For our programs in 2015 we are looking for mentors and students of Open Technology projects who would like to join us and register their groups on the FOSSASIA community network.

The FOSSASIA summit will take place from March 13-15 in Singapore. The call for papers is open until December 20. If you are interested to present at the event, please register here: fossasia.org/speaker-registration/

Time: 18:00
Date: Saturday, December 6, 2014
Location: Jazz Island Coffee (爵士岛咖啡二楼)
Address (Chinese): 东城区东直门内大街东扬威街11号楼(来福士大厦对面北侧)
Map: mapbar (via dianping)
Subway: Dongzhimen Exit A
Phone: 010-8406-1040

Links:

Beijinglug Announcement: http://beijinglug.org/…

FOSSASIA Community Network: http://fossasia.net

FOSSASIA Summit Speaker Registration: http://fossasia.org/speaker-registration/

FOSSASIA Code-In: http://www.google-melange.com/gci/org/google/gci2014/fossasia

Join the FOSSASIA Community Network

The FOSSASIA.net project is an initiative to bring the Asian Free and Open Source Software and OpenTech community together and foster cooperation. We make it easy to find communities and projects on a map with links to the websites, social media channels, and automatically updated info from community blogs.

Communities store their information decentrally anywhere on the web – on their server, a blog, or git service. FOSSASIA.net collects information through a stardardized API file on the web. You can generate the API file with the FOSSASIA API generator on our website. Then you add your community to the FOSSASIA network website. Simply add the link of your API file to our list of communities on github.

FAQ

How does it work?
You need to provide a file for our API and add the file to our communities repository. Then fill in the link to your API on our directory on github. That is it!

Where can I store my file?
We prefer that you store your file in our github repository of communities: https://github.com/fossasia/fossasia-communities. It is also possible to store it anywhere on the web, where it is publicly available, e.g. in a blog or CMS page as an attachment. However the github repo is the preferred method currently.

How about updating my file?
If you need to update your links, just upload a new file in the same location.

How do I start?
To make it easier, we created a FOSSASIA API Generator, where you can simply fill in your data here: http://api.fossasia.org/generator When you are finished copy the info from the form on the top right into an empty file or use the download button.

How do I find Geolocation data of my community?
You can find this data from OpenStreetmap. OpenStreetmap shows maps using a URL of the form: www.openstreetmap.org/#map=[Zoom Level]/[Latitude]/[Longitude] So go to www.openstreetmap.org and zoom to the area of your community. For example, if you are zoom into Mumbai, you will get the URL http://www.openstreetmap.org/#map=11/19.0715/72.9499 Then 19.0715 will be the latitude and 72.9499 the longitude.

What is an API?
In computer programming, an application programming interface (API) is a set of routines, protocols, and tools for building software applications. An API expresses a software component in terms of its operations, inputs, outputs, and underlying types. An API defines functionalities that are independent of their respective implementations (e.g. It does not matter what CMS is used), which allows definitions and implementations to vary without compromising each other. Compare: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Application_programming_interface

Links

* Website http://fossasia.net

* Map http://fossasia.net/map/map.html

* FOSSASIA Community Network Tweets https://twitter.com/fantwk