How to Store Mobile Settings in the Server from SUSI Web Chat Settings Page

While we are adding new features and capabilities to SUSI Web Chat application, we wanted to provide settings changing capability to SUSI users. SUSI team decided to maintain a settings page to give that capability to users.

This is how it’s interface looks like now.

In this blog post I’m going to add another setting category to our setting page. This one is for  saving mobile phone number and dial code in the server.

UI Development:

First we need to  add new category to settings page and it should be invisible when user is not logged in. Anonymous users should not get mobile phone category in settings page.

     let menuItems = cookies.get('loggedIn') ?
            <div>
                <div className="settings-list">
                    <Menu
                        onItemTouchTap={this.loadSettings}
                        selectedMenuItemStyle={blueThemeColor}
                        style={{ width: '100%' }}
                        value={this.state.selectedSetting}
                    >
                       <MenuItem value='Mobile' className="setting-item" leftIcon={<MobileIcon />}>Mobile<ChevronRight className="right-chevron" /></MenuItem>
                        <hr className="break-line" />
                    </Menu>
                </div>
            </div>

 

Next we have to show settings UI when user clicks on the category name.

 if (this.state.selectedSetting === 'Mobile' && cookies.get('loggedIn')) {}
                currentSetting = (
  <Translate text="Country/region : " />
                            <DropDownMenu maxHeight={300}
               value={this.state.countryCode?this.state.countryCode:'US'}

 

Show US if the state does not deines the country code

                                onChange={this.handleCountryChange}>
                                {countries}
                            </DropDownMenu>
<Translate text="Phone number : " />
                            <TextField name="selectedCountry"
                            disabled={true}
                            value={countryData.countries[this.state.countryCode?this.state.countryCode:'US'].countryCallingCodes[0] }
                         	/>
                            <TextField name="serverUrl"
                                onChange={this.handleTelephoneNoChange}
                                value={this.state.phoneNo }
 />
)}

 

Then we need to get list of country names and country dial codes to show in the above drop down. We used country-data node module for that.

To install country-data module use this  command.

npm install --save country-data

 

We have used it in the settings page as below.

import countryData from 'country-data';
    	countryData.countries.all.sort(function(a, b) {
            if(a.name < b.name){ return -1};
            if(a.name > b.name){ return 1};
            return 0;
        });
        let countries = countryData.countries.all.map((country, i) => {
         	return (<MenuItem value={countryData.countries.all[i].alpha2} key={i} primaryText={ countryData.countries.all[i].name+' '+ countryData.countries.all[i].countryCallingCodes[0] } />);
        });

 

First we sort the country data list from it’s name. After that we made a list of “”s from this list of data.
Then we have to check whether the user changed or added the phone number and region (dial code).
It handles by this function mentioned above. ( onChange={this.handleCountryChange}> and
onChange={this.handleTelephoneNoChange} )

    handleCountryChange = (event, index, value) => {
        this.setState({'countryCode': value });
    }

 

Then we have to get the phone number using below function.

    handleTelephoneNoChange = (event, value) => {
        this.setState({'phoneNo': value});
    }

 

Next we have to update the function that triggers when user clicks the save button.

    handleSubmit = () => {
        let newCountryCode = !this.state.countryCode?
        this.intialSettings.countryCode:this.state.countryCode;
        let newCountryDialCode = !this.state.countryDialCode?
        this.intialSettings.countryDialCode:this.state.countryDialCode;
        let newPhoneNo = this.state.phoneNo;
        let vals = {
            countryCode: newCountryCode,
            countryDialCode: newCountryDialCode,
            phoneNo: newPhoneNo
}
let settings = Object.assign({}, vals);
cookies.set('settings', settings);
 this.implementSettings(vals);
 }

 

This code snippet stores Country Code, Country Dial code and phone no in the server.
Now we have to update the Store. Here we are going to change UserPreferencesStore “UserPreferencesStore” .
First we have to setup default values for things we are going to store.

let _defaults = {
	  CountryCode: 'US',
   	  CountryDialCode: '+1',
   	  PhoneNo: ''
}

 

Finally we have to update the dispatchToken to change and get these new data

UserPreferencesStore.dispatchToken = ChatAppDispatcher.register(action => {
   switch (action.type) {
       case ActionTypes.SETTINGS_CHANGED: {
           let settings = action.settings;
           if(settings.hasOwnProperty('theme')){
                   _defaults.Theme = settings.theme;
           }
           if(settings.hasOwnProperty('countryDialCode')){
               _defaults.countryDialCode = settings.countryDialCode;
           }
           if(settings.hasOwnProperty('phoneNo')){
               _defaults.phoneNo = settings.phoneNo;
           }
           if(settings.hasOwnProperty('countryCode')){
               _defaults.countryCode = settings.countryCode;
           }
           UserPreferencesStore.emitChange();
           break;
}
}

 

Finally application is ready to store and update Mobile phone number and region code in the server.

Resources:

Implementation of Child Routes in SUSI Skill CMS

In a previous blog post I discussed about how we implemented routing in SUSI Web Chat Application. In this post I’m planning to discuss about how we developed child routes in SUSI Skill CMS .

When we start developing our application, it was working correctly but  all skills loaded in the same URL. ( skill.susi.ai/SkillPage ). When user clicks the edit button every skill loaded in the same URL ( skill.susi.ai/EditSkill ). We got a requirement to load each of our skills in separate routes. This is how we implemented the child routes of the application.

We wanted to show each individual skill under this type of URL,

skill.susi.ai/ [SKILL GROUP] / [SKILL NAME] / [LANGUAGE]

When user clicks on the edit button, we needed to show that particular skill under this URL.

skill.susi.ai/ [SKILL GROUP] / [SKILL NAME] / edit / [LANGUAGE]

First we set our routings in index.js file.

<Switch>
    <Route exact path="/:category/:skill/edit/:lang" component={Home} />
    <Route exact path="/:category/:skill/:lang" component={SkillListing}/>
    <Route exact path="/" component={BrowseSkill} />
    <Route exact path="*" component={NotFound} />
</Switch>

We have to add the “exact” attribute, if we don’t add that it will not redirect users to “404” page when user trying to access wrong routes.

Next step is sending data from one component to another component.
In SUSI Skill CMS, user can choose any skill from the home page. Then after it goes to the skill page and shows details about the selected skill. We have to modify the button as,

<Link to={{ pathname: '/'+self.state.groupValue+'/'+el+'/'+self.state.languageValue }} >
<Card>
</Card>
</Link>

Now the user clicks on the card. It changes the URL and loads the corresponding component according to the routes that we defined in “index.js” file previously.
Second thing that we need to do is to catch URL routs and render relevant data according to the URL routes.
Let’s say I clicked on “distance” skill. Then user will go to this URL “http://skills.susi.ai/Knowledge/distance/en ”
Now It loads the “SkillListing” component according to the route we defined in “ index.js ” here ””.
To derive data from URL we simply used these codes in “SkillListing.js”.

let baseUrl = 'http://api.susi.ai/cms/getSkillMetadata.json';           
let modelValue = "general";
           this.name = this.props.location.pathname.split('/')[2];
           this.groupValue = this.props.location.pathname.split('/')[1];
           this.languageValue = this.props.location.pathname.split('/')[3];
           url = baseUrl + '?model=' + modelValue + '&group=' + this.groupValue + '&language=' + this.languageValue + '&skill=' + this.name;

We collected data from the URL and made another URL, we used this URL to get details of the skill from the server. We used this urls as below.

           $.ajax({
               url: url,
               jsonpCallback: 'pc',
               dataType: 'jsonp',
               jsonp: 'callback',
               crossDomain: true,
               success: function (data) {
                   self.updateData(data.skill_metadata)
               }
           });

If the Ajax request is success, those data are passed to “updateData()” and it updates the component and shows to users like this.

We applied same mechanism to the edit button and edit page. This is how we modified skill.susi.ai ‘s Routings. If you like to contribute SUSI Skill CMS please fork our repository on github. here

Resources:

  • Previous Blogpost about routing: https://blog.fossasia.org/implementation-of-react-routers-in-susi-web-chat/
  • React Router v4 tutorial https://medium.com/@pshrmn/a-simple-react-router-v4-tutorial-7f23ff27adf

Displaying Blog Posts on SUSI AI Web Chat’s Blog Page and Share Posts

FOSSASIA is maintaining a superior blog and it contains blog posts about projects and programs run by FOSSASIA. While we were implementing SUSI Web Chat Application we got a requirement to implement a blog page. Speciality of this blog page is it is not a separate blog page, it fetches blog posts and other related data by filtering the FOSSASIA’s main blog.

In this blog post I’ll discuss how we fetched and managed those data on front-end and how we made the appearance same as the FOSSASIA main blog.

First we get blog posts as a JSON. For that we used rss2json API. we can get the RSS feed as a JSON by sending our RSS feed URL to the rss2json API. Check the rss2json API documentation here.

It produces all posts as items array. Next we store this array of responses in our application as a state.

This response contains blog post titles featured images’ details and post content and other metadata such as tags, author name and published date.

We had few requirements to fulfill. First one is to show full content of the blogpost in a new blog page.

We can take the full content from response like this,

this.state.posts.slice(this.state.startPage, this.state.startPage + 10).map((posts, i) => {
        let content = posts.content;
})

We can use “cintent” variable to show content but it contains the featured image. We have to skip that image. For that,

let htmlContent = content.replace(/<img.*?>/, '');

Now we have to render this string value as HTML. For that we have to install “test-to-html” package using below command.

npm install html-to-text --save

Now we can convert text into html like this

htmlContent = renderHTML(htmlContent);

We used this HTML content inside the “CardText” tag.

<CardText> {htmlContent}
</CardText>

At the bottom of the post we needed to show author name, tags list and categories list.
Since tags and categories come in one array, we have to separate them.
First we defined an array which contains all the categories in Fossasia blog. Then we compared that array with the categories we got like this.

       const allCategories = ['FOSSASIA','GSoC','SUSI.AI']

Compare two arrays,

          posts.categories.map((cat) => {
                let k = 0;
                for (k = 0; k < allCategories.length; k++) {
                              if (cat === allCategories[k]) {
                                  category.push(cat);
                              }
              	}
          });

we defined this “arrDiff” simple function to get the difference of two arrays.

     var tags=arrDiff(category,posts.categories)

Make the list of categories

let fCategory=category.map((cat) =>
<span key={cat} ><a className="tagname" href={'https://blog.fossasia.org/category/' + cat.replace(/\s+/g, '-').toLowerCase()} rel="noopener noreferrer">{cat}</a></span>
   );

We can use above step to make tags list.

Then after used it in the “CardActions”

<span className='categoryContainer'>
    <i className="fa fa-folder-open-o tagIcon"></i>
    {fCategory}
</span>

 

According to the final requirement we needed to add social media share buttons for Facebook and Twitter.

If we need to make a twitter share button we have to follow up this method. But we can use “react-share” npm package to make these kind of share buttons.

This is how we made Facebook and Twitter share buttons. First of all we have to install “react-share” package using below command.

npm install react-share --save

Then we have to import the installed package.

import { ShareButtons, generateShareIcon } from 'react-share';

Then after we defined Button and Icon like this.

      const {FacebookShareButton,TwitterShareButton} = ShareButtons;
      const FacebookIcon = generateShareIcon('facebook');
      const TwitterIcon = generateShareIcon('twitter');

Now we can use these components.

<TwitterShareButton url={posts.guid} title={posts.title} via='asksusi' hashtags={posts.categories.slice(0, 4)} >                                                                                <TwitterIcon size={32} round={true} />
</TwitterShareButton>
<FacebookShareButton url={posts.link}>
     <FacebookIcon size={32} round={true} />
</FacebookShareButton>

We have to send URL and title of the post with the tweet and tags as hashtags. So we have to pass them into the component as above.
Above code produces this model of tweets.

That’s how “text-to-htm”l and “react-share” works on react. If you would like to contribute to SUSI project or any other FOSSASIA project please fork our repositories on github.

Resources:

Sorting Users and Implementing Animations on SUSI Web Chat Team Page

While we were developing the chat application, we wanted to show details of Developers.  So we planned to build a team page for SUSI Web Chat Application. In this post I discuss few things we built there. Like sorting feature, animations of the page, usage of Material UI.

First we made an array of objects to store user details. In that array we grouped them in sub arrays so we can refer them in different sections separately. We stored following data in “TeamList.js” in an array.

var team = [{
 'mentors': [{
   'name': 'Mario Behling',
   'github': 'http://github.com/mariobehling',
   'avatar': 'http://fossasia.org/img/mariobehling.jpg',
   'twitter': 'https://twitter.com/mariobehling',
   'linkedin': 'https://www.linkedin.com/in/mariobehling/',
   'blog': '#'
 }]
},{ 'server': [{
    }]
}

There was a requirement to sort developers by their name so we had to build a way to sort out array data which are in main array. This is how we built that.
The function we are going to use for sorting.

   function compare(a, b) {
     if (a.name < b.name) { return -1; }
     if (a.name > b.name) { return 1; }
     return 0;
   }

This is how we have used it to sort developers.

import team from './TeamList';
team[1].server.sort(compare);

In this function we took values of object two by two and compared.
Now we have to show these sorted information on view.
Extract data that we want from array and we used material UI Cards to show these data on view.
This is how we extracted data from the array.

   team[1].server.sort(compare);
   let server = team[1].server.map((serv, i) => {
     return ( <Card className='team-card' key={i}>
         <CardMedia className="container" >
           <img src={serv.avatar} alt={serv.name} className="image" />
           <div className="overlay" >
             <div className="text"> <FourButtons member={serv} /> </div>
           </div>
         </CardMedia>
         <CardTitle title={serv.name} subtitle={serv.designation} />
       </Card>)   })

Now it shows data on the view.
“” contains an image of the member. We need to show social media links of the user on mouseover. We did that using simple CSS. I added a block comment around those particular styles. Check those styles here.

.overlay {
 position: absolute;
 bottom: 100%;
 left: 0;
 right: 0;
 background-color: #000;
 overflow: hidden;
 width: 100%;
 height:0;
 transition: .3s ease;
 opacity:0;
}
.container:hover .overlay {
 bottom: 0;
 height: 100%;
 opacity:0.7;
}

Above lines show that how we made the animation of the overlay animation.

Now we want to show social media buttons on the overlay. We made another separate component for buttons and return those like this.

render() {
       let member= this.props.member;
       return (<div>
         <CardActions>
           <IconButton href={member.github} target="_blank" >
  <CardActions>
		</div>)}

Finally we showed those data on Team page. We returned these JSX from render(){} method.

         <div className="team-header">
           <div className="support__heading">Developers</div>
         </div>
         <div className='team-container'>{server}</div>

I have mentioned few resources which I used to implement these features. If you are willing to contribute SUSI AI Web Chat application. Fork our repository on github.

Resources

Documentation of Array.sort https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Array/sort

How to use Image overlay CSS effects: https://www.w3schools.com/howto/howto_css_image_overlay.asp

Implementation of React Routers in SUSI Web Chat

When we were developing the SUSI Web Chat application we wanted to implement set of static pages with the chat application. In the start we just wanted to navigate  through different static pages and move back to the web chat application. But it takes time to load a new page when user clicks on a link. Our goal was therefore to minimize the loading time by using lazy loading. For that we used react-route .It is standard library for react js.

From the docs:

“React Router keeps your UI synced with the URL. It has a simple API with powerful features like lazy code loading, dynamic route matching, and location transition handling built right in. Make the URL your first thought, not an after-thought.” (https://www.npmjs.com/package/react-router-plus)

We need react-route to be installed in our application first. We can install it using NPM by running this command on project folder.

npm install --save react-router-dom

Next we have to set up our routes. We have two types of headers in our application. One is chat application header, second one is static page header. In static page header we have a navigation to switch between static pages.
First we need to choose the router type because there are two types of routers in react. “” and “” we can use “” in our example because our server can handle dynamic requests. If we are requesting data from static page we should use “” .
We used that in “” and made another new component called “” and used it on “index.js” like this.

import { BrowserRouter as Router } from 'react-router-dom';
Import App from .App;
 ReactDOM.render(
  	<IntlProvider locale={defaultPrefLanguage}>
		<Router> <App /> </Router>
	</IntlProvider>,
  	document.getElementById('root')  );

In “App.js” we can set up routes like this.

        <Switch>
            <Route exact path='/' component={ChatApp}/>
            <Route exact path="/overview" component={Overview} />
            <Route exact path='/blog' component={Blog} />
            <Route exact path="/logout" component={Logout} />
            <Route exact path="/settings" component={Settings} />
            <Route exact path="*" component={NotFound} />
        </Switch>

We use elements to render component when they match with the corresponding path. We use “path” to add router location that we need to match width the component. We use “exact” property to render the component if location exactly matches with the “path”. If we do not use “exact” property it renders when we have child routes after the path like “/blog/1 “ .
We used “” element to group routes.
We can’t use anchor () tags to navigate pages without reloading. We have to use tags instead of that. We have to replace all the places we have used

<a href= ‘URL’>lable name </a>

with this,

<Link to=’URL’>Lable name</Link>   

After doing above changes application will perform faster and it will load all page contents soon after you click the navigation links.

If you would like to join with FOSSASIA and contribute to SUSI Web Chat Application please fork this repository on Github.

Resources

How SUSI AI Web Chat Custom Theme Settings are Stored in Server

We had a feature in SUSI Web Chat to make custom themes but those themes were not storing on the server. We needed to store those theme data on server. In this post I discuss how we implemented that feature. This is the PR that I sent to solve this issue.

Previously we had two theme options. According to the user’s choice it changes theme colors. Since we needed to store custom themes and use them without any conflicts with existing “light” and “dark” themes we made another theme option called “custom”. After user clicks on the custom theme it automatically changes to “custom” mode.

This is how we did it in “onClick” of the custom theme .

    this.setState({'theme':'custom'})
     let currSettings = UserPreferencesStore.getPreferences();
     let settingsChanged = {};
     if(currSettings.Theme !=='custom'){
       settingsChanged.Theme = 'custom';
       Actions.settingsChanged(settingsChanged);
     }

Then after we collected all the chosen color values to a variable. While we store our color values on a variable we avoid the “#” letter which is at very first of the color value. Because we can’t send that value to the server with “#” character.

this.customTheme.body=state.body.substring(1);

After selecting color values user have to press the save button to push those selected values to server. We execute below method on click of the save button.

 saveThemeSettings = () => {
    let customData='';
    Object.keys(this.customTheme).forEach((key) => {
      customData=customData+this.customTheme[key]+','
    });
    this.setState({'theme':'custom'})
    let currSettings = UserPreferencesStore.getPreferences();
    let settingsChanged = {};
    if(currSettings.Theme !=='custom'){
      settingsChanged.Theme = 'custom';
      Actions.settingsChanged(settingsChanged);
    }
    Actions.customThemeChanged(customData);
    this.handleClose();
  }

Using this method we derived those data that we added into the variable and made a single string array. Then after we executed the action that we needed to execute to store data on the server.
It is “Actions.customThemeChanged(customData);”.
This action is defined in “Settings.actions.js” file.

export function customThemeChanged(customTheme) {
  ChatAppDispatcher.dispatch({
    type: ActionTypes.CHANGE_CUSTOM_THEME,
    customTheme
  });
  Actions.pushCustomThemeToServer(customTheme);
}

We used this Action name constant “CHANGE_CUSTOM_THEME” in “ChatConstant.js” file

We defined this “pushCustomThemeToServer”  function on “API.actions.js” file. here

export function pushCustomThemeToServer(customTheme){
  
  if(cookies.get('loggedIn')===null||
    cookies.get('loggedIn')===undefined) {
    return;
  }
       url = BASE_URL+'/aaa/changeUserSettings.json?'
          +'key=custom_theme_value&value='+customTheme
          +'&access_token='+cookies.get('loggedIn');
        makeServerCall(url);
}

Here we check whether user is logged in or not. If user is logged in we get the access token from cookies and attach it to the request URL and execute the “makeServerCall” function that we defined previously.

Now our data are saved on server. Use this url to check what settings you have in your user account.
api.susi.ai/aaa/listUserSettings.json?access_token=YOUR_ACCESS_TOKEN
Now we can use stored values. First we need to update state. For that we got theme values from server like this

  var themeValue=[];
   if(UserPreferencesStore.getThemeValues()){
     themeValue=UserPreferencesStore.getThemeValues().split(',');
   }

 

Here we got data from server and put it to the array.

Then after we set it to state. While adding custom theme settings to state we set the “#” character before each colour value.  Here is the code

    header: themeValue.length>4?'#'+themeValue[0]:'#4285f4',
    pane: themeValue.length>4?'#'+themeValue[1]:'#f5f4f6',
    body: themeValue.length>4?'#'+themeValue[2]:'#fff',
    composer: themeValue.length>4?'#'+themeValue[3]:'#f5f4f6',
    textarea:  themeValue.length>4?'#'+themeValue[4]:'#fff',

 

Now we have to use these data with our JSX elements. This is how we did this.

We checked the current theme mode. If it is “custom” we used the values we got from server. Otherwise we used corresponding colors for other “light” and “dark” theme. Here is the full code.

 

var bodyColor;
    var TopBarColor;
    var composerColor;
    var messagePane;
    var textArea;
switch(this.state.currTheme){
  case 'custom':{
    bodyColor = this.state.body;
    TopBarColor = this.state.header;
    composerColor = this.state.composer;
    messagePane = this.state.pane;
    textArea = this.state.textarea;
    break;
  }

You can use these variables wherever you need to show colors. As an example this is how we passed header color to top bar.

 <TopBar  header={TopBarColor} >

This is how we stored and fetched custom theme data from store.

Resources:

  • How to store and receive data from SUSI server using HTTP requests. https://github.com/fossasia/chat.susi.ai/blob/master/docs/Accounting.md
  • How Flux Architecture works: https://facebook.github.io/flux/

Implementation of SUSI Web Chat Auto Sizing Message Composer

While we are using SUSI Web Chat Application we may have to send lengthy messages. Existing application’s Message composer supports for lengthy messages but it manages a constant value for every user input. While we were developing the application we got a requirement to build a growing message composer.

Final output of this implementation produces a message composer that grows when user completes a new line until user completes 5 lines and after 5 lines it maintains a fixed size and enables scrolling.

So we tried several packages to get this done. And finally we did this  using react-textarea-autosize  it gives all these features and it gives user to customize the elements furthermore.

First we have to install the npm package:

npm install --save react-textarea-autosize

After the installation we have to import the package on top of the “MessageComposer.react.js”

import TextareaAutosize from 'react-textarea-autosize';

Next we need to use this package like this,

         <TextareaAutosize
           className='scroll'
           id='scroll'
           minRows={1}
           maxRows={5}
           placeholder="Type a message..."
           value={this.state.text}
           onChange={this._onChange.bind(this)}
           onKeyDown={this._onKeyDown.bind(this)}
           ref={(textarea) => { this.nameInput = textarea; }}
           style={{ background: this.props.textarea}}
         />

 

This package provides “minRows” and “maxRows”  attributes and we can define minimum height of the text area and maximum height it can grow. If you need to know more about auto growing text areas and to get examples refer this.

Next we wanted to hide the scrollbar which is displaying when the textarea height is exceeding.

How we hide the scrollbars  on chrome browsers.

.scroll::-webkit-scrollbar {
 	 display: none;
}

This is how we hide the scrollbar on firefox browser.

.scroll {
 	overflow: -moz-scrollbars-none;
}

Now we have to style up the textarea because it comes with default styles. We wrapped up the textarea with the div and applied our styles to that. In my case we wrapped up my textarea with  <div className=“textBack”>

This is how we styled the textarea using the wrapper div.

.textBack{
 background: #fff;
 width: 83%;
 border-radius: 40px;
 padding: 5px 20px;
 display: block;
 position: relative;
 top: 12%;
 box-sizing: content-box;
 margin: 0px 0 10px 0;
}

Our textarea is like this.

It expands when user exceeds the width of textarea.

This is how we implemented the SUSI Web Chat’s growing message composer. If you would like to contribute please fork our repository on github  

Resources:

Use of Flux Architecture to Switch between Themes in SUSI Web Chat

While we were developing the SUSI Web Chat we got a requirement to build a dark theme. And to build a way that user can switch between dark and light theme.

SUSI Web Chat application is made according to the Flux architecture, So we had to build sub components according to that architecture.

What is flux:

Flux is not a framework. It is an Architecture/pattern that we can use to build applications using react and some other frameworks. Below figure shows the way how that architecture works and how it communicate.

How flux works:

Flux has four types of components. Those are views, actions, dispatcher and stores. We use JSX to build and integrate views into our JavaScript code.

When someone triggers an event from view, it triggers an action and that action sends particular action details  such as Actiontype, action name  and data to dispatcher. Dispatcher broadcasts those details to every store which are registered with the particular dispatcher. That means every store gets all the action details and data which are broadcasting from dispatchers which they are registered.

Let’s say we have triggered an action from view that is going to change the value of the store. Those action details are coming to dispatcher. Then dispatcher broadcasts those data to every store that registered with it. Matching action will trigger and update its value. If there is any change happened in store, view automatically updates corresponding view.

How themes are changing:

We have a store called “SettingStore.js”. This “SettingStore” contains theme values like current theme. We store other settings of the application such as: Mic input settings, Custom server details, Speech Output details, Default Language, etc.it is responsible to provide these details to corresponding view.

let CHANGE_EVENT = 'change';
class SettingStore extends EventEmitter {
   constructor() {
       super();
       this.theme = true; 
   }

We use “this.theme = true” in constructor to switch light theme as the default theme.

getTheme() { //provides current value of theme
       return this.theme;
   }

This method returns the value of the current theme when it triggers.

   changeTheme(themeChanges) {
       this.theme = !this.theme;
       this.emit(CHANGE_EVENT);
   }

We use “changeTheme” method to change the selected theme.

   handleActions(action) {
       switch (action.type) {
           case ActionTypes.THEME_CHANGED: {
               this.changeTheme(action.theme);
               break;
           }
           default: {
               // do nothing
           }
       }
   }
}

This switch case is the place that store gets actions distributed from the dispatcher and executes relevant method.

const settingStore = new SettingStore();
ChatAppDispatcher.register(settingStore.handleActions.bind(settingStore));
export default settingStore;

Here we registered our store(SettingStore) to “ChatAppDispatcher” .

This is how Store works.
Now we need to get the default light theme to the view. For that we have to call ”getTheme()” function. We can use the value it returns to update the state of the application.
Now we are going to change the theme. To do that we have to trigger “changeTheme” method of “Settingstrore” from view ( MessageSection.react.js ).
We trigger below method on click of the “Change Theme” button. It triggers the action called “themeChanged”.

 themeChanger(event) {
   Actions.themeChanged(!this.state.darkTheme);
 }

Previous method executes “themeChanged()” function of the actions.js file.

export function themeChanged(theme) {
 ChatAppDispatcher.dispatch({
   type: ActionTypes.THEME_CHANGED,
   theme //data came from parameter
 });
};

In above function we collect data from the view and send those data, method details to dispatcher.
Dispatcher sends those details to each and every registered store. In our case we have “SettingStore” and update the state to new dark theme.
This is how themes are changing in SUSI AI Web Chat application. Check this link to see the preview.

Resources:

  • Read About Flux: https://facebook.github.io/flux/
  • GitHub repository: https://github.com/fossasia/chat.susi.ai
  • Live Web Chat: http://chat.susi.ai/

Implementing a Collapsible Responsive App Bar of SUSI Web Chat

In the SUSI Web Chat application we wanted to make few static pages such as: Overview, Terms, Support, Docs, Blog, Team, Settings and About. The idea was to show them in app bar. Requirements were  to have the capability to collapse on small viewports and to use Material UI components. In this blog post I’m going to elaborate how we built the responsive app bar Using Material UI components.

First we added usual Material UI app bar component  like this.

             <header className="nav-down" id="headerSection">
             <AppBar
               className="topAppBar"
title={<a href={this.state.baseUrl} ><img src="susi-white.svg" alt="susi-logo"  className="siteTitle"/></a>}
               style={{backgroundColor:'#0084ff'}}
               onLeftIconButtonTouchTap={this.handleDrawer}
               iconElementRight={<TopMenu />}
             />
             </header>

We added SUSI logo instead of the text title using below code snippet and linked it to the home page like this.

title={<a href={this.state.baseUrl} ><img src="susi-white.svg" alt="susi-logo"  className="siteTitle"/></a>}

We have defined “this.state.baseUrl” in constructor and it gets the base url of the web application.

this.state = {
       openDrawer: false, 
baseUrl: window.location.protocol + '//' + window.location.host + '/'
       };

We need to open the right drawer when we click on the button on top left corner. So we have to define two methods to open and close drawer as below.

   handleDrawer = () => this.setState({openDrawer: !this.state.openDrawer});
   handleDrawerClose = () => this.setState({openDrawer: false});

Now we have to add components that we need to show on the right side of the app bar. We connect those elements to the app bar like this. “iconElementRight={}”

We defined “TopMenu” Items like this.

   const TopMenu = (props) => (
   <div>
     <div className="top-menu">
     <FlatButton label="Overview"  href="/overview" style={{color:'#fff'}} className="topMenu-item"/>
     <FlatButton label="Team"  href="/team" style={{color:'#fff'}} className="topMenu-item"/>
     </div>

We added FlatButtons to place links to other static pages. After all we needed a FlatButton that gives IconMenu to show login and signup options.

     <IconMenu {...props} iconButtonElement={
         <IconButton iconStyle={{color:'#fff'}} ><MoreVertIcon /></IconButton>
     }>
     <MenuItem primaryText="Chat" containerElement={<Link to="/logout" />}
                   rightIcon={<Chat/>}/>
     </IconMenu>
   </div>
   );

After adding all these correctly you will see this kind of an app bar in your application.

Now our app bar is ready. But it does not collapse on small viewports.
So we planned to hide flat buttons on small sized screens and show the menu button. For that we used media queries.

@media only screen and (max-width: 800px){
   .topMenu-item{ display: none !important;  }
   .topAppBar button{ display: block  !important; }
}

This is how we built the responsive app bar using Material UI components. You can check the preview from this url. If you are willing to contribute to SUSI Web Chat here is the GitHub repository.

Resources:

  • Material UI Components: http://www.material-ui.com/#/components/
  • Learn More about media queries: https://www.w3schools.com/css/css_rwd_mediaqueries.asp

Implementing Hiding App Bar of SUSI Web Chat Application

In the SUSI Web Chat application we got a requirement to build a responsive app bar for static pages and there was another requirement to  show and hide the app bar when user scrolls. Basically this is how it should work: The app bar should be hidden after user scrolls down to a certain extent. When user scrolls up, It should appear again.

First we tried readymade node packages to do this task. But these packages are hard to customize. So we planned to make this feature from the sketch. We used Jquery for this. This is how we built this.

First we installed jQuery package using this command.

npm install jquery

Next we imported it on top of the application like this.

import $ from 'jquery'

We have discussed about this app bar and how we made it in previous blog post. Our app bar is like this.

             <header className="nav-down" id="headerSection">
             <AppBar
               className="topAppBar"
               title={<img src="susi-white.svg" alt="susi-logo"
               className="siteTitle"/>}
               style={{backgroundColor:'#0084ff'}}
               onLeftIconButtonTouchTap={this.handleDrawer}
               iconElementRight={<TopMenu />}
             />
             </header>

We have to use these HTML elements to write jQuery code. But we can’t refer HTML elements before it renders. So we have to define it soon after the render method executes. We can do it using “React LifeCycle” method. We have to add our code into the “componentDidMount()” method.
This is how we used jQuery inside the “componentDidMount()” lifeCycle method. Here we assigned the height of the App Bar using “$(‘header’).outerHeight();”

componentDidMount(){
     var didScroll;
     var lastScrollTop = 0;
     var delta = 5;
     var navbarHeight = $('header').outerHeight();

Here we assigned the height of the app bar to “navbarHeight” variable.

     $(window).scroll(function(event){
         didScroll = true;
     });

In this part we checked whether the user has scrolled or not. If user scrolled we set the value of “didScroll” to “true”.
Now we have to define what to do if user has scrolled.

     function hasScrolled() {
         var st = $(window).scrollTop();
         if(Math.abs(lastScrollTop - st) <= delta){

             return;
         }

Here we get the absolute scrolled height. If the height is less than the delta value we defined, it does not do anything. It just returns.

         if (st > lastScrollTop && st > navbarHeight){
             $('header').removeClass('nav-down').addClass('nav-up');
         } else if(st + $(window).height() < $(document).height()) {
             $('header').removeClass('nav-up').addClass('nav-down');
         }
         lastScrollTop = st;
     }

Here we hide the app bar after user scrolled down more than the height of the app bar. If we need to change the height which app bar should disappear, we just need to add a value to the condition like this.

if (st > lastScrollTop && st > navbarHeight + 200){

If the user scrolled down more than that value we change the class name of the element “nav-down” to “nav-up”.
And we change the className “nav-up” to “nav-down” when user is scrolling up.
We defined CSS classes in the stylesheet to do these things and the animations of action.

header {
   background: #f5b335;
   height: 40px;
   position: fixed;
   top: 0;
   transition: top 0.5s ease-in-out;
   width: 100%;
}

.nav-up {
   top: -100px;
}

We have defined the things which we need to do when user scrolls.
Now we have to call this function if user has scrolled

     setInterval(function() {
         if (didScroll) {
             hasScrolled();
             didScroll = false;
         }
     }, 2500);
   }

If the “didcroll” is “true” we execute the “hasScrolled()” function. And set 2500 millisecond time interval. Because of that app bar does not hide right after user scrolls. It triggers the function after 2.5 seconds later.
This is how we built the scroll bar hiding feature using react JS and jQuery.

Resources:

  • Learn more about React LifeCycle Methods http://busypeoples.github.io/post/react-component-lifecycle/
  • Use jQuery in React component: https://medium.com/@shuvohabib/using-jquery-in-react-component-the-refs-way-969de9aa651f