Adding device names’ support for check-ins to Open Event Server

The Open Event Server provides backend support to Open Event Organizer Android App which is used to check-in attendees in an event. When checking in attendees, it is important for any event organizer to keep track of the device that was used to check someone in. For this, we provide an option in the Organizer App settings to set the device name. But this device name should have support in the server as well.

The problem is to be able to add device name data corresponding to each check-in time. Currently attendees model has an attribute called `checkin-times`, which is a csv of time strings. For each value in the csv, there has to be a corresponding device name value. This could be achieved by providing a similar csv key-value pair for “device-name-checkin”.

The constraints that we need to check for while handling device names are as follows:

  • If there’s `device_name_checkin` in the request, there must be `is_checked_in` and `checkin_times` in the data as well.
  • Number of items in checkin_times csv in data should be equal to the length of the device_name_checkin csv.
  • If there’s checkin_times in data, and device-name-checkin is absent, it must be set to `-` indicating no set device name.
if ‘device_name_checkin’ in data and data[‘device_name_checkin’] is not None:
  if ‘is_checked_in’ not in data or not data[‘is_checked_in’]:
       raise UnprocessableEntity(
           {‘pointer’: ‘/data/attributes/device_name_checkin’},
           “Attendee needs to be checked in first”
       )
  elif ‘checkin_times’ not in data or data[‘checkin_times’] is None:
      raise UnprocessableEntity(
          {‘pointer’: ‘/data/attributes/device_name_checkin’},
           “Check in Times missing”
      )
  elif len(data[‘checkin_times’].split(“,”)) != len(data[‘device_name_checkin’].split(“,”)):
     raise UnprocessableEntity(
           {‘pointer’: ‘/data/attributes/device_name_checkin’},
           “Check in Times missing for the corresponding device name”
         )
 if ‘checkin_times’ in data:
   if ‘device_name_checkin’ not in data or data[‘device_name_checkin’] is None:
       data[‘device_name_checkin’] = ‘-‘

The case is a little different for a PATCH request since we need to check for the number of items differently like this:

if ‘device_name_checkin’ in data and data[‘device_name_checkin’] is not None:
            if obj.device_name_checkin is not None:
               data[‘device_name_checkin’] = ‘{},{}’.format(obj.device_name_checkin, data[‘device_name_checkin’])                                                   
            if len(data[‘checkin_times’].split(“,”)) != len(data[‘device_name_checkin’].split(“,”)):
               raise UnprocessableEntity(
                   {‘pointer’: ‘/data/attributes/device_name_checkin’},
                   “Check in Time missing for the corresponding device name”)

Since we expect only the latest value to be present in a PATCH request, we first add it to the object by formatting using:

'{},{}'.format(obj.device_name_checkin, data['device_name_checkin'])

and then compare the length of the obtained CSVs for check in times and device names, so that corresponding to each check in time, we have either a device name or the default fill in value ‘-’.

That’s all. Read the full code here.

Requests and Responses:

Resources

  1. SQLAlchemy Docs
    https://docs.sqlalchemy.org/en/latest/
  2. Alembic Docs
    http://alembic.zzzcomputing.com/en/latest/
  3. Flask REST JSON API Classical CRUD operation
    https://flask-rest-jsonapi.readthedocs.io/en/latest/quickstart.html#classical-crud-operations
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Implementing Checkout Times for Attendees on Open Event Server

As of this writing, Open Event Server did not have the functionality to add, manipulate and delete checkout times of attendees. Event organizers should have access to log and update attendee checkout times. So it was decided to implement this functionality in the server. This boiled down to having an additional attribute checkout_times in the ticket holder model of the server.

So the first step was to add a string column named checkout_times in the ticket holder database model, since this was going to be a place for comma-separated values (CSV) of attendee checkout times. An additional boolean attribute named is_checked_out was also added to convey whether an attendee has checked out or not. After the addition of these attributes in the model, we saved the file and performed the required database migration:

To create the migration file for the above changes:

$ python manage.py db migrate

To upgrade the database instance:

$ python manage.py db upgrade

Once the migration was done, the API schema file was modified accordingly:

class AttendeeSchemaPublic(SoftDeletionSchema):
    """
    Api schema for Ticket Holder Model
    """
    
    checkout_times = fields.Str(allow_none=True)  # ←
    is_checked_out = fields.Boolean()  # ←
    

After the schema change, the attendees API file had to have code to incorporate these new fields. The way it works is that when we receive an update request on the server, we add the current time in the checkout times CSV to indicate a checkout time, so the checkout times field is essentially read-only:

from datetime import datetime
...
class AttendeeDetail(ResourceDetail):
    def before_update_object(self, obj, data, kwargs):
        
        if 'is_checked_out' in data and data['is_checked_out']:
        ...
        else:
            if obj.checkout_times and data['checkout_times'] not in \
obj.checkout_times.split(","):
                data['checkout_times'] = '{},{},{}'.format(
                    obj.checkout_times,
                    data['checkout_times'],
                    datetime.utcnow())

 

This completes the implementation of checkout times, so now organizers can process attendee checkouts on the server with ease.

Resources

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Adding Tickets Relationship with Discount Codes in Open Event Server

Recently (as of this writing), it was discovered that the relationship between discount codes and tickets was not implemented yet in Open Event Server. It turns out that the server has two types of discount codes – discount codes for entire events and discount codes for individual tickets of a specific event. More information on how discount code themselves are implemented in the server can be found in this blog post from 2017 – Discount Codes in Open Event Server.

So, for implementing the relationship of discount codes with tickets, it was decided to be present only for discount codes that have the DiscountCodeSchemaTicket schema, since those are the discount codes that are used for individual tickets. As a first step, the `tickets` attribute of the discount code model was removed, as it was redundant. The already implemented used_for attribute did the same job, and with better validation. At the same time, discount code was added as an attribute.

In the ticket model file:

discount_code_id = db.Column(db.Integer, db.ForeignKey('discount_codes.id', ondelete='CASCADE'))
discount_code = db.relationship('DiscountCode', backref="tickets")

Also, in the __init__ constructor:

def __init__(self, ..., discount_code_id=None, ...):
    ...
    ...
    self.discount_code_id = discount_code_id

After that, we added a discount_code_id field in the ticket schema file:

discount_code_id = fields.Integer(allow_none=True)

In this file, we also removed the redundant tickets field.

Now, we migrated the Open Event Server database via the following commands:

$ python manage.py db migrate

then

$ python manage.py db upgrade

Next, in the discount code schema file, we added the tickets relationship. Note that this is a one-to-many relationship. One discount code (for tickets) can be mapped to many tickets. Here is the code for that relationship, in the discount code schema file, under the DiscountCodeSchemaTicket class:

tickets = Relationship(attribute='tickets',
self_view='v1.discount_code_tickets',
self_view_kwargs={'id': '<id>'},
related_view='v1.ticket_list',
related_view_kwargs={'discount_code_id': '<id>'},
schema='TicketSchemaPublic',
many=True,
type_='ticket')

For this, we, of course, imported the TicketSchemaPublic in this file first. After that, we created a DiscountCodeTicketRelationship class in the discount codes API file:

class DiscountCodeTicketRelationship(ResourceRelationship):
    """
    DiscountCode Ticket Relationship
    """
    decorators = (jwt_required,)
    methods = ['GET', 'PATCH']
    schema = DiscountCodeSchemaTicket
    data_layer = {'session': db.session, 'model': DiscountCode}

The next step was to add the query code to fetch the tickets related to a particular discount code from the database. For this, we added the following snippet to the query() method of the TicketList class in the tickets API file:

if view_kwargs.get('discount_code_id'):
    discount_code = safe_query(self, DiscountCode, 'id', view_kwargs['discount_code_id'], 'discount_code_id')
    # discount_code - ticket :: one-to-many relationship
    query_ = self.session.query(Ticket).filter_by(discount_code_id=discount_code.id)

The only thing that remains now is adding the API routes for this relationship. We do that in the project’s __init__.py file:

api.route(TicketList, 'ticket_list', '/events/<int:event_id>/tickets',
'/events/<event_identifier>/tickets', '/ticket-tags/<int:ticket_tag_id>/tickets',
'/access-codes/<int:access_code_id>/tickets', '/orders/<order_identifier>/tickets',
'/discount-codes/<int:discount_code_id>/tickets')

api.route(DiscountCodeTicketRelationship, 'discount_code_tickets',
'/discount-codes/<int:id>/relationships/tickets')

 

Many routes already map to TicketList, we added one for that comes from discount codes API. Now we can use Postman to check this relationship, and it indeed works as expected, as seen below!

Screen Shot 2018-08-21 at 1.54.22 PM

Here’s the end:

Screen Shot 2018-08-21 at 1.54.35 PM.png

References:

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Database Listener for User Centric Events

Badgeyay is an open-source utility developed by FOSSASIA to generate badges for conferences and events. The project is separated into two components to ease maintainability. First is the frontend part which is in ember and second part is backend which is in Flask. The choice of database to support backend is PostgreSQL.

Now comes the problem, whenever a user is registered in the database, he should receive  a verification mail, that he is successfully registered on the platform. For this case we have to listen to the database events on User model. This issue has greater extendibility than only sending greeting or verification mail to the user. We can extend this to trigger services that are dependent on user registration, like subscribing the user to some set of services based on the plan he opted while registration and many more.

These type of issues cannot be handled by normal relationship with tables and other entities, there has to be logic in place to support such functionalities. So the challenges for tackling the problem are as follows:

  • Listen to the insert_action in User model
  • Extracting the details necessary for the logic
  • Execute particular logic

Procedure

  1. Attaching insert_action listener to the User model. This function will get triggered whenever an entity is saved in the User model.

<!– HTML generated using hilite.me –>

@db.event.listens_for(User, "after_insert")
def logic(mapper, connection, target): {
......
}
  1. When the function gets triggered, extract the details of the saved user that is necessary for the logic. As currently we are sending greeting mail to the user,we only need the email of the user. Target is the actual saved user passed as argument to the listening function from the library.

<!– HTML generated using hilite.me –>

msg = {}
msg['subject'] = "Welcome to Badgeyay"
msg['receipent'] = target.email
msg['body'] = "It's good to have you onboard with Badgeyay. Welcome to " \
"FOSSASIA Family."
sendMail(msg)
  1. Now the details are passed to sendMail() function for sending mail which uses flask-mail library to send mail to the recipient.
    def sendMail(message):
    if message and message.receipent:
    try:
    msg = Message(
    subject=message.subject,
    sender=app.config['MAIL_USERNAME'], Response(200).generateMessage(
    recipients=[message.receipent],
    body=message.body)
    Mail(app).send(msg)
    except Exception as e:
    return jsonify(
    Response(500).exceptWithMessage(
    str(e),
    'Unable to send the mail'))
    return jsonify(
    Response(200).generateMessage(
    'Mail Sent'))
    else:
    return jsonify(
    Response(403).generateMessage(
    'No data received')) 'No data received'))
    
  2. This will send mail to the user who has been registered to the application.

Similarly we can use separate logics according to the need of the application.

 

The Pull Request for the above functionality is at this Link

Topics Involved

Working on the issue involve following topics:

  • Configuring mail service to allow insecure apps access.
  • Sending mail from the flask-mail to end user
  • Attaching listener to listen for database change
  • Extraction of data from saved object in database sqlalchemy.

Resources

  • Sending Mails Programmatically –  Link
  • Flask Mail Documentation – Link
  • Listening to database events – Link
  • Enabling access to GMAIL to send mails to recipient – Link
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Implementing “Change Password” API in Open Event Frontend

In Open Event Frontend, users can change the password for their account in the ‘Settings’ section. Changing one’s password will require the previous password of the same account which ensures the security. To implement change in password API, we created a REST endpoint here since the password cannot be included in the user model and thereby exposed to the client.

There is also a check on the server side of the old password. Thus, if the old password entered matches the one on the server, the post is successful and the server saves the new password. We achieve this as follows:

We have a change password form located at ‘settings/change-password’, which contains three input fields for old password, new password and confirm new password.

On submitting the form, we pass the action from the component to the controller.

Components consist of two parts: a template written in Handlebars, and a source file written in JavaScript that defines the component’s behavior.

Controllers behave like a specialized type of Component that is rendered by the router when entering a Route.

We could have handled this action in component itself. But, Ember JS’ main principle is DDAU i.e data down actions up. That is the main reason why we handle the action in out controller.

submit() {
      this.onValid(() => {
      this.sendAction('changePassword', this.getProperties('passwordCurrent', 'passwordNew'));
      });
}

Thus, we handle the action in our controller as follows:

 changePassword(passwordData) {
      this.set('isLoading', true);
      let payload = {
        'data': {
          'old-password' : passwordData.passwordCurrent,
          'new-password' : passwordData.passwordNew
        }
      };
      this.get('loader')
        .post('/auth/change-password', payload)
        .then(() => {
          this.get('notify').success(this.l10n.t('Password updated successfully'));
        })
        .catch(error => {
          if (error.error) {
            this.get('notify').error(this.l10n.t(error.error));
          } else {
            this.get('notify').error(this.l10n.t('Unexpected error. Password did not change.'));
          }
        })
        .finally(() => {
          this.set('isLoading', false);
          this.setProperties({ 'passwordCurrent': '', 'passwordNew': '', 'passwordRepeat': '' });
        });
    }

Here, we are getting the old password and the new password passed from the form and making a POST to the endpoint:

v1/auth/change-password

If the old password check goes successful on the server side, the server returns a successful response:

{ 
 "email": "[email protected]",
 "id": "1",
 "name": "example",
 "password-changed": true
}

Thus, the user can change password in Open Event Frontend.
Resources: Docs on loader service in Ember JS

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