Initial Setups for Connecting SUSI Smart Speaker with iPhone/iPad

You may have experienced Apple HomPad, Google Home, Alexa etc or read about smart speakers that offer interactive action over voice commands. The smart speaker uses the hot word for activation. They utilize Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and other wireless protocols.

SUSI.AI is also coming with Open Source smart speaker that can do various actions like playing music etc over voice commands. To use SUSI Smart Speaker, you have to connect it to the SUSI iOS or Android App. You can manage your connected devices in SUSI iOS, Android and Web clients. Here we will see initial setups for connecting SUSI Smart Speaker with iPhone/iPad (iOS Devices).

You may aware that iOS does not allow connecting to wifi within the app. To connect to a particular Wi-Fi, you have to go to phone settings, from there you can connect to Wi-Fi. SUSI Smart Speaker create a temporary Hotspot for initial setups. Follow the instruction below to connect to SUSI Smart Speaker hotspot –

  1. Tap to Home button, and go to your iPhone Settings > Wi-Fi
  2. Connect to the Wi-Fi hotspot for the device that you are setting up. It will have name “susi.ai”, like in the image below
  3. Come back to the SUSI app to proceed with setup.

These instruction is also available within the app when you are not connected to SUSI Smart Speaker hotspot and click `Setup a Device` or plus icon on Device Activity screen navigation bar.

Devices Activity and getting current Wi-Fi SSID:

Devices section in Settings screen shows the currently connected device. In Devices Activity screen, the user can manage the connected device. Only a logged-in user can access Devices Activity. When the user clicks on Device Accessories in setting, if the user is not logged-in, an alert is prompted with Login option. By clicking Login option, user directed to Login screen where the user can log in and come back to device section to proceed further.

If the user is already logged-in, Device Activity screen is presented. We use following method to scan if iPhone/iPad is connected to SUSI Smart Speaker:

func fetchSSIDInfo() -> String? {
var ssid: String?
if let interfaces = CNCopySupportedInterfaces() as? [String] {
for interface in interfaces {
if let interfaceInfo = CNCopyCurrentNetworkInfo(interface as CFString) as NSDictionary? {
ssid = interfaceInfo[kCNNetworkInfoKeySSID as String] as? String
break
}
}
}
return ssid
}

Apple’s SystemConfiguration API is used to get current Wi-Fi SSID. SystemConfiguration Allow applications to access a device’s network configuration settings. Determine the reachability of the device, such as whether Wi-Fi or cell connectivity is active.

import SystemConfiguration.CaptiveNetwork

The method above return the SSID of your device current Wi-Fi. SSID is simply the technical term for a network name. When you set up a wireless home network, you give it a name to distinguish it from other networks in your neighborhood. You’ll see this name when you connect your device to your wireless network.

If current Wi-Fi match with SUSI Smart Speaker hotspot, we display device in TableView, if not we display “No device connected yet”.

if let speakerSSID = fetchSSIDInfo(), speakerSSID == "susi.ai" {
cell.accessoryType = .disclosureIndicator
cell.textLabel?.text = speakerSSID
} else {
cell.accessoryType = .none
cell.textLabel?.text = "No device connected yet"
}

SUSI Smart Speaker is coming with very exciting features. Stay tuned.

Resources –

  1. SUSI iOS Link: https://github.com/fossasia/susi_iOS
  2. Apple’s SystemConfiguration Framework Documentation
  3. Bell’s article on What Do SSID and WPA2 mean

Creating Onboarding Screens for SUSI iOS

Onboarding screens are designed to introduce users to how the application works and what main functions it has, to help them understand how to use it. It can also be helpful for developers who intend to extend the current project.

When you enter in the SUSI iOS app for the first time, you see the onboarding screen displaying information about SUSI iOS features. SUSI iOS is using Material design so the UI of Onboarding screens are following the Material design.

There are four onboarding screens:

  1. Login (Showing the login features of SUSI iOS) – Login to the app using SUSI.AI account or else signup to create a new account or just skip login.
  2. Chat Interface (Showing the chat screen of SUSI iOS) – Interact with SUSI.AI asking queries. Use microphone button for voice interaction.
  3. SUSI Skill (Showing SUSI Skills features) – Browse and try your favorite SUSI.AI Skill.
  4. Chat Settings (SUSI iOS Chat Settings) – Personalize your chat settings for the better experience.

Onboarding Screens User Interface

 

There are three important components of every onboarding screen:

  1. Title – Title of the screen (Login, Chat Interface etc).
  2. Image – Showing the visual presentation of SUSI iOS features.
  3. Description – Small descriptions of features.

Onboarding screen user control:

  • Pagination – Give the ability to the user to go next and previous onboarding screen.
  • Swiping – Left and Right swipe are implemented to enable the user to go to next and previous onboarding screen.
  • Skip Button – Enable users to skip the onboarding instructions and go directly to the login screen.

Implementation of Onboarding Screens:

  • Initializing PaperOnboarding:
override func viewDidLoad() {
super.viewDidLoad()

UIApplication.shared.statusBarStyle = .lightContent
view.accessibilityIdentifier = "onboardingView"

setupPaperOnboardingView()
skipButton.isHidden = false
bottomLoginSkipButton.isHidden = true
view.bringSubview(toFront: skipButton)
view.bringSubview(toFront: bottomLoginSkipButton)
}

private func setupPaperOnboardingView() {
let onboarding = PaperOnboarding()
onboarding.delegate = self
onboarding.dataSource = self
onboarding.translatesAutoresizingMaskIntoConstraints = false
view.addSubview(onboarding)

// Add constraints
for attribute: NSLayoutAttribute in [.left, .right, .top, .bottom] {
let constraint = NSLayoutConstraint(item: onboarding,
attribute: attribute,
relatedBy: .equal,
toItem: view,
attribute: attribute,
multiplier: 1,
constant: 0)
view.addConstraint(constraint)
}
}

 

  • Adding content using dataSource methods:

    let items = [
    OnboardingItemInfo(informationImage: Asset.login.image,
    title: ControllerConstants.Onboarding.login,
    description: ControllerConstants.Onboarding.loginDescription,
    pageIcon: Asset.pageIcon.image,
    color: UIColor.skillOnboardingColor(),
    titleColor: UIColor.white, descriptionColor: UIColor.white, titleFont: titleFont, descriptionFont: descriptionFont),OnboardingItemInfo(informationImage: Asset.chat.image,
    title: ControllerConstants.Onboarding.chatInterface,
    description: ControllerConstants.Onboarding.chatInterfaceDescription,
    pageIcon: Asset.pageIcon.image,
    color: UIColor.chatOnboardingColor(),
    titleColor: UIColor.white, descriptionColor: UIColor.white, titleFont: titleFont, descriptionFont: descriptionFont),OnboardingItemInfo(informationImage: Asset.skill.image,
    title: ControllerConstants.Onboarding.skillListing,
    description: ControllerConstants.Onboarding.skillListingDescription,
    pageIcon: Asset.pageIcon.image,
    color: UIColor.loginOnboardingColor(),
    titleColor: UIColor.white, descriptionColor: UIColor.white, titleFont: titleFont, descriptionFont: descriptionFont),OnboardingItemInfo(informationImage: Asset.skillSettings.image,
    title: ControllerConstants.Onboarding.chatSettings,
    description: ControllerConstants.Onboarding.chatSettingsDescription,
    pageIcon: Asset.pageIcon.image,
    color: UIColor.iOSBlue(),
    titleColor: UIColor.white, descriptionColor: UIColor.white, titleFont: titleFont, descriptionFont: descriptionFont)]
    extension OnboardingViewController: PaperOnboardingDelegate, PaperOnboardingDataSource {
    func onboardingItemsCount() -> Int {
    return items.count
    }
    
    func onboardingItem(at index: Int) -> OnboardingItemInfo {
    return items[index]
    }
    }
    

     

  • Hiding/Showing Skip Buttons:
    func onboardingWillTransitonToIndex(_ index: Int) {
    skipButton.isHidden = index == 3 ? true : false
    bottomLoginSkipButton.isHidden = index == 3 ? false : true
    }
    

Resources:

Store User’s Personal Information with SUSI

In this blog, I discuss how SUSI.AI stores personal information of it’s users. This personal information is mostly about usernames/links to different websites like LinkedIn, GitHub, Facebook, Google/Gmail etc. To store such details, we have a dedicated API. Endpoint is :

https://api.susi.ai/aaa/storePersonalInfo.json

In this API/Servlet, storing the details and getting the details, both the aspects are covered. At the time of making the API call, user has an option either to ask the server for a list of available store names along with their values or request the server to store the value for a particular store name. If a store name already exists and a client makes a call with new/updated value, The servlet will update the value for that particular store name.

The reason you are looking at minimal user role as USER is quite obvious, i.e. these details correspond to a particular user. Hence neither we want someone writing such information anonymously nor we want this information to be visible to anonymous user until allowed by the user.

In the next steps, we start evaluating the API call made by the client. We look at the combination of the parameters present in the request. If the request is to fetch list of available stores, server first checks if Accounting object even has a JSONObject for “stores” or not. If not found, it sends an error message “No personal information is added yet.” and error code 420. Prior to all these steps, server first generates an accounting object for the user. If found, details are encoded as JSONObject’s parameter. Look at the code below to understand things fairly.

Accounting accounting = DAO.getAccounting(authorization.getIdentity());
        if(post.get("fetchDetails", false)) {
            if(accounting.getJSON().has("stores")){
                JSONObject jsonObject = accounting.getJSON().getJSONObject("stores");
                json.put("stores", jsonObject);
                json.put("accepted", true);
                json.put("message", "details fetched successfully.");
                return new ServiceResponse(json);
            } else {
                throw new APIException(420, "No personal information is added yet.");
            }
        }

If the request was not to fetch the list of available stores, It means client wants server to save a new field or update a previous value for that of a store name. A combination of If-else evaluates whether the call even contains required parameters.

if (post.get(“storeName”, null) == null) {
throw new APIException(422, “Bad store name encountered!”);
}

String storeName = post.get(“storeName”, null);
if (post.get(“value”, null) == null) {
throw new APIException(422, “Bad store name value encountered!”);
}

If request contains all the required data, then store name & value are extracted as key-value pair from the request.

In the next steps, since the server is expected to store list of the store names for a particular user, First the identity is gathered from the already present authorization object in “serviceImpl” method. If the server finds a “null” identity, It throws an error with error code 400 and error message “Specified User Setting not found, ensure you are logged in”.

Else, server first checks if a JSONObject with key “stores” exists or not. If not, It will create an object and will put the key value pair in the new JSONObject. Otherwise it would anyways do so.

Since these details are for a particular account (i.e. for a particular user), these are placed in the Accounting.json file. For better knowledge, Look at the code snippet below.

if (accounting.getJSON().has("stores")) {
                accounting.getJSON().getJSONObject("stores").put(storeName, value);
            } else {
                JSONObject jsonObject = new JSONObject(true);
                jsonObject.put(storeName, value);
                accounting.getJSON().put("stores", jsonObject);
            }

            json.put("accepted", true);
            json.put("message", "You successfully updated your account information!");
            return new ServiceResponse(json);

Additional Resources :

Showing “Get started” button in SUSI Viber bot

When we start a chat with SUSI.AI on Viber i.e. SUSI Viberbot, there should be an option on how to get started with the bot. The response to it are some options like “Visit repository”, “How to contribute” which direct the user to check how SUSI.AI bot is made and prompts him/her to contribute to it. Along with that an option of “start chatting” can be shown to add up some sample queries for the user to try.

To accomplish the task at hand, we will accomplish these sub tasks:

  1. To show the “Get started” button.
  2. To show the reply to “Get started” query.
  3. To respond to the queries, nested in the response of “Get started”

Showing “Get started”:

The Viber developers platform notifies us when a user starts a conversation with our bot. To be exact, a conversation_started event is sent to our webhook and can be handled accordingly. The Viberbot shows a welcome message to the user along with a Get started button to help him/her start.

To send just the welcome message:

if (req.body.event === 'conversation_started') {
       // Welcome Message
       var options = {
           method: 'POST',
           url: 'https://chatapi.viber.com/pa/send_message',
           headers: headerBody,
           body: {
               // some required body properties here
               text: 'Welcome to SUSI.AI!, ' + req.body.user.name + '.',
               // code for showing the get started button here.
        }
           json: true
       };
 
       request(options, function(error, res, body) {
           // handle error
       });
   }

The next step is to show the “Get started” button. To show that we use a keyboard tool, provided by Viber developers platform. So after the “text” key we have the “keyboard” key and a value for it:

keyboard: {
             "Type": "keyboard",
             "DefaultHeight": true,
             "Buttons": [{
                 "ActionType": "reply",
                 "ActionBody": "Get started",
             }]
         }

The action type as shown in the code, can be “reply” or “open-url”. The “reply” action type, triggers an automatic query sent back with “Get started” (i.e. the value of “ActionBody” key), when that button gets clicked.

Hence, this code helps us tackle our first sub task:

Reply to “Get started”:

We target to make each SUSI.AI bot generic. The SUSI FBbot and SUSI Tweetbot shows some options like “Visit repository”, “Start chatting” and “How to contribute?” for the “Get started” query. We render the same answer structure in Viberbot.

The “rich_media” type helps us send buttons in our reply message. As we ought to use three buttons in our message, the button rows are three in the body object:

if(message === "Get started"){
                   var options = {
                       method: 'POST',
                       url: 'https://chatapi.viber.com/pa/send_message',
                       headers: headerBody,
                       body: {
                           // some body object properties here
                           type: 'rich_media',
                           rich_media: {
                               Type: "rich_media",
                               ButtonsGroupColumns: 6,
                               ButtonsGroupRows: 3,
                               BgColor: "#FFFFFF",
                               Buttons: buttons
                           }
                       },
                       json: true
                   };
 
                   request(options, function(error, res, body) {
                       if (error) throw new Error(error);
                       console.log(body);
                   });

As said before, 2 type of Action types are available – “open-url” and “reply”. “Visit repository” button has an “open-url” action type and “How to contribute?” or “start chatting” has a “reply” action type.

Example of “Visit repository” button:

var buttons = [{
                Columns: 6,
                Rows: 1,
                Text: "Visit repository",
                "ActionType": "open-url",
                "ActionBody": "https://www.github.com/fossasia/susi_server",
                // some text styling properties here
             }];

To respond to the “reply” action type queries:

When the “reply” action type button gets clicked, it triggers an automatic query sent back to the bot with the value same as that of the “ActionBody” key. So we just need to apply a check if the message string recieved is “Start chatting” or “How to contribute?”

For the response to “Start chatting”, we plan to show sample queries for the user to try. This can be shown by using buttons with the action type as “reply”.

Code snippet to show a button with the text as “What is FOSSASIA?”:

var buttons = [{
                        Columns: 6,
                        Rows: 1,
                        Text: "What is FOSSASIA? ",
                        "ActionType": "reply",
                        "ActionBody": "What is FOSSASIA?",
                        // text styling here
                    }];

For the response to “How to contribute”, we show some messages to help the user contribute to SUSI.AI. These messages also just need buttons with it, to be able to apply the necessary action.

We respond with 2 messages to the user, both the messages have a button.

For example, a button to visit the SUSI.AI Gitter channel:

var buttons = [{
                    Columns: 6,
                    Rows: 1,
                       Text: "<font color=#323232><b>Chat on Gitter</b></font>",
                      ActionType: "open-url",
                      ActionBody: "https://www.gitter.im/fossasia/susi_server",
                      // text styling here
            }];

This way we have successfully added the “Get started” option to our Viberbot and handled all the subsequent steps.

Resources:

  1. Viber video managing chat extensions by Ingrid Lunden from Tech crunch.
  2. Develop a chat bot with node js by Slobodan Stojanović from smashing magazine.

Creating Settings Screen in SUSI Android Using PreferenceActivity and Kotlin

An Android application often includes settings that allow the user to modify features of the app. For example, SUSI Android app allows users to specify whether they want to use in built mic to give speech input or not. Different settings in SUSI Android app and their purpose are given below

Setting                                        Purpose
Enter As Send It allows users to specify whether they want to use enter key to send message or to add new line.
Mic Input It allows users to specify whether they want to use in built mic to give speech input or not.
Speech Always It allows users to specify whether they want voice output in case of speech input or not.
Speech Output It allows users to specify whether they want speech output irrespective of input type or not.
Language It allows users to set different query language.
Reset Password It allows users to change password.
Select Server It allows users to specify whether they want to use custom server or not.

Android provides a powerful framework, Preference framework, that allows us to define the way we want preferences. In this blog post, I will show you how Settings UI is created using Preference framework and Kotlin in SUSI Android.

Advantages of using Preference are:

  • It has own UI so we don‘t have to develop our own UI for it
  • It stores the string into the SharedPreferences so we don’t need to manage the values in SharedPreference.

First, we will add the dependency in build.gradle(project) file as shown below.

compile ‘com.takisoft.fix:preference-v7:25.4.0.3’

To create the custom style for our Settings Activity screen we can set

android:theme=“@style/PreferencesThemeLight”

as the base theme and can apply various other modifications and colour over this. By default, it has the usual Day and Night theme with NoActionBar extension.

Layout Design

I used PreferenceScreen as the main container to create UI of Settings and filled it with the other components. Different components used are following:

  • SwitchPreferenceCompat: This gives us the Switch Preference which we can use to toggle between two different modes in the setting.
<com.takisoft.fix.support.v7.preference.SwitchPreferenceCompat

android:defaultValue=”true”

  • PreferenceCategory: It is used for grouping the preference. For example, Chat Settings, Mic Settings, Speech Settings etc are different groups in settings.

  • ListPreference: This preference display list of values and help in selecting one. For example in setLanguage option ListPreference is used to show a list of query language. List of query language is provided via xml file array.xml (res/values). Attribute android:entries point to arrays languagentries and android:entryValue holds the corresponding value defined for each of the languages.
<ListPreference

android:title=“@string/Language”
android:key=“Lang_Select”

android:entries=“@array/languagentries”

android:entryValues=“@array/languagentry”

</ListPreference>

Implementation in SUSI Android

All the logic related to Preferences and their action is written in ChatSettingsFragment class. ChatSettingsFragment extends PreferenceFragmentCompat class.

class ChatSettingsFragment : PreferenceFragmentCompat()

Fragment populate the preferences when created. addPreferencesFromResource method is used to inflate view from xml.

addPreferencesFromResource(R.xml.pref_settings)

Reference

List all the Users Registered on SUSI.AI

In this blog, I’ll be telling on how SUSI admins can access list of all the registered users from SUSI-server. Following this, they may modify/edit user role of any registered user.

What is User Role?

A UserRole defines the servlet access right. Not all users are allowed to access all the data and services. For  example, To list all the users, minimal user role expected is ADMIN. This classification of users are inspired by the wikipedia User Access Levels, see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:User_access_levels.While querying SUSI, Users are classified into 7 different categories, namely :

  • BOT
  • ANONYMOUS
  • USER  
  • REVIEWER
  • ACCOUNTCREATOR
  • ADMIN
  • BUREAUCRAT

* Please see that these are as of the date of publish of this blog. These are subject to change, which is very unlikely.

All the users who are not logged in but interacting with SUSI are anonymous users. These are only subject to chat with SUSI, login, signup or may use forgot password service. Once a user login to the server, a token is generated and sent back to client to maintain the identity, hence acknowledging them. Privileged users are those who have special rights with them. These are more like moderators with much special rights than any other user. At the top level of the hierarchy are the admins. These users have more rights than anyone. They can change role of any other user, override decision of any privileged user as well.

Let us now look at the control flow of this.

First things first, make a component of User List in the project. Let us name it ListUsers and since it has to be accessible by those users who possess ADMIN rights, you will find it enclosed in Admin package in components folder. Open up

index.js file, import Listusers component  and add route to it in the following way :

...//other import statements
import ListUser from "./components/Admin/ListUser/ListUser";
...//class definition and other methods
<Route path="/listUser" component={ListUser}/>
//other routes defined

Find a suitable image for “List Users” option and add the option for List Users in static appbar component along with the image. We have used Material UI’s List image in our project.

...// other imports

import List from 'material-ui/svg-icons/action/list';

Class and method definition

<MenuItem primaryText="List Users"
          onTouchTap={this.handleClose}
          containerElement={<Link to="/listUser" />}
                rightIcon={<List/>}
      />

...//other options in top right corner menu

Above code snippet will add an option to redirect admins to ‘/listUsers’ route. Let us now have a closer look at functionality of both client and server. By now you must have known what ComponentDidMount does. {If not, I’ll tell you. This is a method which is given first execution after the page is rendered. For more information, visit this link}. As mentioned earlier as well that this list will be available only for admins and may be even extended for privileged users but not for anonymous or any other user, an AJAX call is made to server in ComponentDidMount of ‘listuser’ route which returns the base user role of current user. If user is an Admin, another method, fetchUsers() is called.

let url;
        url = "http://api.susi.ai/aaa/account-permissions.json";
        $.ajax({
            url: url,
            dataType: 'jsonp',
            jsonpCallback: 'py',
            jsonp: 'callback',
            crossDomain: true,
            success: function (response) {
                console.log(response.userRole)
                if (response.userRole !== "admin") {
                    console.log("Not an admin")
                } else {
                    this.fetchUsers();
                    console.log("Admin")
                }
            }.bind(this),
});

In fetchUsers method, an AJAX call is made to server which returns username in JSONArray. The response looks something likes this :

{
	"users" : {
		"email:""[email protected]",
...
},
"Username":["[email protected]", "[email protected]"...]
}

Now, only rendering this data in a systematic form is left. To give it a proper look, we have used material-ui’s table. Import Table, TableBody, TableHeader,

   TableHeaderColumn, TableRow, TableRowColumn from material-ui/table.

In fetchUsers method, response is catched in data Oblect. Now the keys are extracted from the JSON response and mapped with an array. Iterating through array received as username array, we get list of all the registered users. Now, popuulate the data in the table you generated.

return (
                        <TableRow key={i}>
                            <TableRowColumn>{++i}>
                            <TableRowColumn>{name}</TableRowColumn>
                            <TableRowColumn> </TableRowColumn>
                            <TableRowColumn> </TableRowColumn>
                            <TableRowColumn> </TableRowColumn>
                            <TableRowColumn> </TableRowColumn>
                        </TableRow>
                    )

Above piece of code may help you while populating the table. These details are returned from susi server which gets a list of all the registered in the following manner. First, it checks if base url of this user is something apart from admin. If not, it returns error which may look like this :

Failed to load resource: the server responded with a status of 401 (Base user role not sufficient. Your base user role is 'ANONYMOUS', your user role is 'anonymous')

Otherwise, it will generate a client identity, use to to get an authorization object which will loop through authorization.json file and return all the users encoded as JSONArray.

Additional Resources

  1. Official Material UI Documentation on Tables from marterial-ui
  2. Answer by Marco Bonelli on Stackoverflow on How to map JSON response in JavaScript?
  3. Answer by janpieter_z on Stackoverflow – on Render JSON data in ReactJS table

SUSI.AI User Roles and How to Modify Them

In this blog, I discuss what is ‘user-role’ in SUSI.AI, what are the various roles and how SUSI admins can modify/update a user’s roles.

What is User Role?

A UserRole defines the servlet access right. Not all users are allowed to access all the data and services. For  example, To list all the users, minimal user role expected is ADMIN. This classification of users are inspired by the wikipedia User Access Levels, see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:User_access_levels.While querying SUSI, Users are classified into 7 different categories, namely :

  • BOT
  • ANONYMOUS
  • USER  
  • REVIEWER
  • ACCOUNTCREATOR
  • ADMIN
  • BUREAUCRAT

* Please see that these are as of the date of publish of this blog. These are subject to change, which is very unlikely.

If SUSI is active as a bot on some bot integrated platform (like line or kik), the user role assigned to it will be that of BOT. This user role just has technical access to the server.

All the users who are not logged in but interacting with SUSI are ANONYMOUS users. These are only subject to chat, login and signup. They may use forgot password service and reset password services as well.

Once a user login to the server, a token is generated and sent back to client to maintain the identity, hence acknowledging them as USER(s).

Users with role assigned as “REVIEWERS” are expected to manage the Skill CMS. There might be some dispute or conflict in a skill. REVIEWERS then take the access of skill data and finalise the conflict there itself for smooth functionality.

ADMIN users are those who have special rights with them. These are more like moderators with much special rights than any other user.

At the top level of the hierarchy are the BUREAUCRATS. These users have more rights than anyone. They can change role of any other user, override decision of any ADMIN user as well. Both admins and bureaucrats have the access to all the settings file on the server. They not only can look at the list, but also download and upload them. Now these users also have right to upgrade or downgrade any other user as well.

All these user roles are defined in UserRole.java file.

In each request received by the server, the user role of user making the request is compared with the minimal user role in getMinimalUserRole() method. This method is defined in AbstractAPIHandler which validates if a user is allowed to access a particular servlet or not.

private void process(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response, Query query) throws ServletException, IOException {
	// object initialisation and comparsions
// user authorization: we use the identification of the user to get the assigned authorization
        Authorization authorization = DAO.getAuthorization(identity);

        if (authorization.getUserRole().ordinal() < minimalUserRole.ordinal()) {
        	response.sendError(401, "Base user role not sufficient. Your base user role is '" + authorization.getUserRole().name() + "', your user role is '" + authorization.getUserRole().getName() + "'");
			return;
        }
// evaluations based on other request parameters.
}

Now that we know about what User Roles actually are, let us look at how the servlet which allows the users {with at least ADMIN login} to change user role of some other user works.

In the request, 2 parameters are expected. These are :

  • user : email id of the user whose role has to be changed.
  • role : new role which will be assigned to this user.

Using a switch case, we identify the user role which is requested. If role is found to be null or any other value apart from “bot”, “anonymous”, “user”, “reviewer”, “accountcreator”, “admin” or “bureaucrat”, an error with error code 400 and error message “Bad User role” is thrown.

In the next steps, server generates client identity in order to get the corresponding Authorization object. If the user is not found in the database, again an error is thrown with error code 400 and error message “role not found

ClientCredential credential = new ClientCredential(ClientCredential.Type.passwd_login, userTobeUpgraded);
            ClientIdentity identity = new ClientIdentity(ClientIdentity.Type.email, credential.getName());
            if (!DAO.hasAuthorization(identity)) {
                throw new APIException(400, "Username not found");
            }

By now, server is clear with the user identity and new role to be assigned. Since the user role is defined in authorization.json file, we overwrite the existing user role and finally server sends back the new user role of the use

Authorization auth = DAO.getAuthorization(identity);
            try {
                auth.setUserRole(userRole);
            } catch (IllegalArgumentException e) {
                throw new APIException(400, "role not found");
            }

            // Print Response
            result.put("newDetails", auth.getJSON());
            result.put("accepted", true);
            result.put("message", "User role changed successfully!!");
            return new ServiceResponse(result);

 

Making Skill Display Cards Identical in SUSI.AI Skill CMS

SUSI.AI Skill CMS shows all the skills of SUSI.AI. The cards used to display all the skills follow flexbox structure and adjust their height according to content. This lead to cards of different sizes and this needed to be fixed. This needed to fix as the cards looked like this:

The cards display following things:

  • Image related to skill
  • An example query related to skill in double quotes
  • Name of skill
  • Short description of skill

Now to get all these, we make an ajax call to the following endpoint:

http://api.susi.ai/cms/getSkillList.json?model='+ this.state.modelValue + '&group=' + this.state.groupValue + '&language=' + this.state.languageValue

Explanation:

  • this.state.modelValue: This is the model of the skill, stored in state of component
  • this.state.groupValue: This represents the group to which skill belongs to. For example Knowledge, Communication, Music, and Audio, etc.
  • this.state.languageValue: This represents the ISO language code of language in which skill is defined

Now the response is in JSONP format and it looks like:

Now we parse the response to get the information needed and return the following Card(Material UI Component):

<Link key={el}
     to={{
        pathname: '/' + self.state.groupValue + '/' + el + '/' + self.state.languageValue,
            state: {
                        url: url,
                        element: el,
                        name: el,
                        modelValue: self.state.modelValue,
                        groupValue: self.state.groupValue,
                        languageValue: self.state.languageValue,
                       }
           }}>
           <Card style={styles.row} key={el}>
                <div style={styles.right} key={el}>
                       {image ? <div style={styles.imageContainer}>
                        <img alt={skill_name}
                          src={image}
                          style={styles.image} />
                          </div> :
                         <CircleImage name={el} size='48' />}
                             <div style={styles.titleStyle}>{examples}</div>
                             </div>
                             <div style={styles.details}>
                                 <h3 style={styles.name}>{skill_name}</h3>
                                 <p style={styles.description}>{description}</p>
                             </div>
         </Card>
</Link>

Now the information that leads to non-uniformity in these cards is the skill description. Now to solve this we decided to put a certain limit to the description length and if that limit is crossed, then we will show the following dots: “”. The height and width of the cards were fixed according to screen size and we modified the description as follows:

if (skill.descriptions) {
      if (skill.descriptions.length > 120) {
          description = skill.descriptions.substring(0, 119) + '...';
      }
      else {
          description = skill.descriptions;
      }
}

This way no content was being cut and all the skill cards looks identical:

Resources:

Implementing Author’s Skill Page in SUSI.AI CMS

SUSI.AI Skill CMS is improving every day and we keep adding new features to it. Recently a feature was added to display all the skills by an author. This feature only showed the list of skills. The user might want to visit the skill page to see the description so we linked the skills on the list to skill page. The list looked like this:

We need to link skill name and image to respective skill page. Now since this is react based app, we do not have different URL for different skills due to SPA. The description, images and other relevant details of skills were being passed as props. We needed to have routes through which we can directly access the skill. This was done by implementing child routes for Skill CMS. Earlier the description, images, and other relevant data was being passed as props from the BrowseSkill component, but now we need to derive this from the URL:

let baseUrl = 'http://api.susi.ai/cms/getSkillMetadata.json';           
let modelValue = "general";
this.name = this.props.location.pathname.split('/')[2];
this.groupValue = this.props.location.pathname.split('/')[1];
this.languageValue = this.props.location.pathname.split('/')[3];
url = baseUrl + '?model=' + modelValue + '&group=' + this.groupValue +        '&language=' + this.languageValue + '&skill=' + this.name;

We now make an ajax call to this URL for fetching the data:

$.ajax({
               url: url,
               jsonpCallback: 'pc',
               dataType: 'jsonp',
               jsonp: 'callback',
               crossDomain: true,
               success: function (data) {
                   self.updateData(data.skill_metadata)
               }
           });

This updates the skill page with the description, image, author and other relevant details of the skills. Now all left to do is link the skills on the list to their respective links. This is done by following code:

We define skillURL as:

let skillURL = 'http://skills.susi.ai/' + parse[6] + '/' + parse[8].split('.')[0] + '/' + parse[7];

Here parse is an array which contains model, group and ISO language code of the skill. We updated the Image and text component as:

<a
   href={skillURL} >
   <Img
     style={imageStyle}
     src={[
           image1,
           image2
          ]}
     unloader={<CircleImage name={name} size="40"/>}
                          />
</a>
<a
   href={skillURL}
   className="effect-underline" >
    {name}
</a>

Now after proper styling, we had the following looking skill list by author:

Resources