Adding Number of Sessions Label in Open Event Android App

The Open Event Android project has a fragment for showing tracks of the event. The Tracks Fragment shows the list of all the Tracks with title and TextDrawable. But currently it is not showing how many sessions particular track has. Adding TextView with rounded corner and colored background showing number of sessions for track gives great UI. In this post I explain how to add TextView with rounded corner and how to use Plurals in Android.

1. Create Drawable for background

Firstly create track_rounded_corner.xml Shape Drawable which will be used as a background of the TextView. The <shape> element must be the root element of Shape drawable. The android:shape attribute defines the type of the shape. It can be rectangle, ring, oval, line. In our case we will use rectangle.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<shape xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:shape="rectangle">

    <corners android:radius="360dp" />

    <padding
        android:bottom="2dp"
        android:left="8dp"
        android:right="8dp"
        android:top="2dp" />
</shape>

 

Here the <corners> element creates rounded corners for the shape with the specified value of radius attribute. This tag is only applied when the shape is a rectangle. The <padding> element adds padding to the containing view. You can modify the value of the padding as per your need. You can feel shape with appropriate color using <solid> as we are setting color dynamically we will not set color here.

2. Add TextView and set Drawable

Now add TextView in the track list item which will contain number of sessions text. Set  track_rounded_corner.xml drawable we created before as background of this TextView using background attribute.

<TextView
        android:id="@+id/no_of_sessions"
        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:background="@drawable/track_rounded_corner"
        android:textColor="@color/white"
        android:textSize="@dimen/text_size_small"/>

 

Set color and text size according to your need. Here don’t add padding in the TextView because we have already added padding in the Drawable. Adding padding in the TextView will override the value specified in the drawable.

3.  Create TextView object in ViewHolder

Now create TextView object noOfSessions and bind it with R.id.no_of_sessions using ButterKnife.bind() method.

public class TrackViewHolder extends RecyclerView.ViewHolder {
    ...

    @BindView(R.id.no_of_sessions)
    TextView noOfSessions;

    private Track track;

    public TrackViewHolder(View itemView, Context context) {
        super(itemView);
        ButterKnife.bind(this, itemView);

    public void bindTrack(Track track) {
        this.track = track;
        ...
    }   
}

 

Here TrackViewHolder is a RecycleriewHolder for the TracksListAdapter. The bindTrack() method of this view holder is used to bind Track with ViewHolder.

4.  Add Quantity Strings (Plurals) for Sessions

Now we want to set the value of TextView. Here if the number of sessions of the track is zero or more than one then we need to set text  “0 sessions” or “2 sessions”. If the track has only one session than we need to set text “1 session” to make text meaningful. In android we have Quantity Strings which can be used to make this task easy.

<resources>
    <!--Quantity Strings(Plurals) for sessions-->
    <plurals name="sessions">
        <item quantity="zero">No sessions</item>
        <item quantity="one">1 session</item>
        <item quantity="other">%d sessions</item>
    </plurals>
</resources>

 

Using this plurals resource we can get appropriate string for specified quantity like “zero”, “one” and  “other” will return “No sessions”, “1 session”, and “2 sessions”. accordingly. 2 can be any value other than 0 and 1.

Now let’s set background color and test for the text view.

int trackColor = Color.parseColor(track.getColor());
int sessions = track.getSessions().size();

noOfSessions.getBackground().setColorFilter(trackColor, PorterDuff.Mode.SRC_ATOP);
noOfSessions.setText(context.getResources().getQuantityString(R.plurals.sessions,
                sessions, sessions));

 

Here we are setting background color of textview using getbackground().setColorFilter() method. To set appropriate text we are using getQuantityString() method which takes plural resource and quantity(in our case no of sessions) as parameters.

Now we are all set. Run the app it will look like this.

Conclusion

Adding TextView with rounded corner and colored background in the App gives great UI and UX. To know more about Rounded corner TextView and Quantity Strings follow the links given below.

Using ThreeTenABP for Time Zone Handling in Open Event Android

The Open Event Android project helps event organizers to organize the event and generate Apps (apk format) for their events/conferences by providing API endpoint or zip generated using Open Event server. For any Event App it is very important that it handles time zone properly. In Open Event Android App there is an option to change time zone setting. The user can view date and time of the event and sessions in Event Timezone and Local time zone in the App. ThreeTenABP provides a backport of the Java SE 8 date-time classes to Java SE 6 and 7. In this blog post I explain how to use ThreeTenABP for time zone handling in Android.

Add dependency

To use ThreeTenABP in your application you have to add the dependency in your app module’s build.gradle file.

dependencies {
      compile    'com.jakewharton.threetenabp:threetenabp:1.0.5'
      testCompile   'org.threeten:threetenbp:1.3.6'
}

Initialize ThreeTenABP

Now in the onCreate() method of the Application class initialize ThreeTenABP.

AndroidThreeTen.init(this);

Create getZoneId() method

Firstly create getZoneId() method which will return ZoneId according to user preference. This method will be used for formatting and parsing dates Here showLocal is user preference. If showLocal is true then this function will return Default local ZoneId otherwise ZoneId of the Event.

private static ZoneId geZoneId() {
        if (showLocal || Utils.isEmpty(getEventTimeZone()))
            return ZoneId.systemDefault();
        else
            return ZoneId.of(getEventTimeZone());
}

Here  getEventTimeZone() method returns time zone string of the Event.

ThreeTenABP has mainly two classes representing date and time both.

  • ZonedDateTime : ‘2011-12-03T10:15:30+01:00[Europe/Paris]’
  • LocalDateTime : ‘2011-12-03T10:15:30’

ZonedDateTime contains timezone information at the end. LocalDateTime doesn’t contain timezone.

Create method for parsing and formating

Now create getDate() method which will take isoDateString and will return ZonedDateTime object.

public static ZonedDateTime getDate(@NonNull String isoDateString) {
        return ZonedDateTime.parse(isoDateString).withZoneSameInstant(getZoneId());;
}

 

Create formatDate() method which takes two arguments first is format string and second is isoDateString. This method will return a formatted string.

public static String formatDate(@NonNull String format, @NonNull String isoDateString) {
        return DateTimeFormatter.ofPattern(format).format(getDate(isoDateString));
}

Use methods

Now we are ready to format and parse isoDateString. Let’s take an example. Let “2017-11-09T23:08:56+08:00” is isoDateString. We can parse this isoDateString using getDate() method which will return ZonedDateTime object.

Parsing:

String isoDateString = "2017-11-09T23:08:56+08:00";

DateConverter.setEventTimeZone("Asia/Singapore");
DateConverter.setShowLocalTime(false);
ZonedDateTime dateInEventTimeZone = DateConverter.getDate(isoDateString);

dateInEventTimeZone.toString();  //2017-11-09T23:08:56+08:00[Asia/Singapore]


TimeZone.setDefault(TimeZone.getDefault());
DateConverter.setShowLocalTime(true);
ZonedDateTime dateInLocalTimeZone = DateConverter.getDate(dateInLocalTimeZone);

dateInLocalTimeZone.toString();  //2017-11-09T20:38:56+05:30[Asia/Kolkata]

 

Formatting:

String date = "2017-03-17T14:00:00+08:00";
String formattedString = formatDate("dd MM YYYY hh:mm:ss a", date));

formattedString // "17 03 2017 02:00:00 PM"

Conclusion

As you can see, ThreeTenABP makes Time Zone handling so easy. It has also support for default formatters and methods. To learn more about ThreeTenABP follow the links given below.

Adding Sticky Headers for Grouping Sponsors List in Open Event Android App

The Open Event Android project has a fragment for showing sponsors of the event. Each Sponsor model has a name, url, type and level. The SponsorsFragment shows list according to type and level. Each sponsor list item has sponsor type TextView. There can be more than one sponsors with the same type. So instead of showing type in the Sponsor item we can add Sticky header showing type at the top which will group the sponsors with the same type and also gives the great UI. In this post I explain how to add the Sticky headers in the RecyclerView using StickyHeadersRecyclerView library.

1. Add dependency

In order to use Sticky Headers in your app add following dependencies in your app module’s build.gradle file.

dependencies {
	compile 'com.timehop.stickyheadersrecyclerview:library:0.4.3'
}

2. Create layout for header

Create recycler_view_header.xml file for the header. It will contain LinearLayout and simple TextView which will show Sponsor type.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<LinearLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="wrap_content"
    android:orientation="vertical">

    <TextView
        android:id="@+id/recyclerview_view_header"
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:padding="@dimen/padding_medium" />

</LinearLayout>

Here you can modify layout according to your need.

3.  Implement StickyRecyclerHeadersAdapter

Now implement StickyRecyclerHeadersAdapter in the List Adapter. Override getHeaderId(), onCreateHeaderViewHolder(), onBindHeaderViewHolder
() methods of the StickyRecyclerHeadersAdapter.

public class SponsorsListAdapter extends BaseRVAdapter<Sponsor, SponsorViewHolder> implements StickyRecyclerHeadersAdapter {
    ...

    @Override
    public long getHeaderId(int position) {...}

    @Override
    public RecyclerView.ViewHolder onCreateHeaderViewHolder(ViewGroup parent) {...}

    @Override
    public void onBindHeaderViewHolder(RecyclerView.ViewHolder holder, int position) {...}
}

 

The getHeaderId() method is used to give an id to the header. It is the main part of the implementation here all the sponsors with the same type should return the same id. In our case we are returning sponsor level because all the sponsor types have corresponding levels.

String level = getItem(position).getLevel();
return Long.valueOf(level);

 

The onCreateHeaderViewHolder() returns Recycler ViewHolder for the header. Here we will use in the inflate() method of  LayoutInflater to get View object of recycler_view_header.xml file. Then return new RecyclerView.ViewHolder object using View object.

View view = LayoutInflater.from(parent.getContext())
                .inflate(R.layout.recycler_view_header, parent, false);
return new RecyclerView.ViewHolder(view) {};

 

The onBindHeaderViewHolder() binds the sponsor to HeaderViewHolder. In this method we sets the sponsor type string to the TextView we have created in the recycler_view_header.xml file.

TextView textView = (TextView) holder.itemView.findViewById(R.id.recyclerview_view_header);
textView.setGravity(Gravity.CENTER_HORIZONTAL);

String sponsorType = getItem(position).getType();
if (!Utils.isEmpty(sponsorType))  
   textView.setText(sponsorType.toUpperCase());

Here you can also modify TextView according to your need. We are centering text using setGravity() method.

4.  Setup RecyclerView

Now create RecyclerView and set adapter using setAdapter() method. Also as we want the linear list of sponsors so set the LinearLayoutManager using setLayoutManager() method.

SponsorsListAdapter sponsorsListAdapter = new SponsorsListAdapter(getContext(), sponsors);
sponsorsRecyclerView.setAdapter(sponsorsListAdapter);
sponsorsRecyclerView.setLayoutManager(new LinearLayoutManager(getActivity()));

 

Create StickyRecyclerHeadersDecoration object and add it in the RecyclerView using addItemDecoration() method.

final StickyRecyclerHeadersDecoration headersDecoration = new StickyRecyclerHeadersDecoration(sponsorsListAdapter);

sponsorsRecyclerView.addItemDecoration(headersDecoration);
sponsorsListAdapter.registerAdapterDataObserver(new RecyclerView.AdapterDataObserver(){
    @Override
    public void onChanged {
            headersDecoration.invalidateHeaders();
    }
});

Now add AdapterDataObserver using registerAdapterDataObserver() method. The onChanged() method in this observer is called whenever dataset changes. So in this method invalidate headers using invalidateHeaders() method of HeaderDecoration.

Now we are all set. Run the app it will look like this.

Conclusion

Sticky headers in the App gives great UI and UX. You can also add a click listener to the headers. To know more about Sticky Headers follow the links given below.

Adding TextDrawable as a PlaceHolder in Open Event Android App

The Open Event Android project has a fragment for showing speakers of the event. Each Speaker model has image-url which is used to fetch the image from server and load in the ImageView. In some cases it is possible that image-url is null or client is not able to fetch the image from the server because of the network problem. So in these cases showing Drawable which contains First letters of the first name and the last name along with a color background gives great UI and UX. In this post I explain how to add TextDrawable as a placeholder in the ImageView using TextDrawable library.

1. Add dependency

In order to use TextDrawable in your app add following dependencies in your app module’s build.gradle file.

dependencies {
	compile 'com.amulyakhare:com.amulyakhare.textdrawable:1.0.1'
}

2. Create static TextDrawable builder

Create static method in the Application class which returns the builder object for creating TextDrawables. We are creating static method so that the method can be used all over the App.

private static TextDrawable.IShapeBuilder textDrawableBuilder;

public static TextDrawable.IShapeBuilder getTextDrawableBuilder()
 {
        if (textDrawableBuilder == null) {
            textDrawableBuilder = TextDrawable.builder();
        }
        return textDrawableBuilder;
}

This method first checks if the builder object is null or not and then initialize it if null. Then it returns the builder object.

3.  Create and initialize TextDrawable object

Now create a TextDrawable object and initialize it using the builder object. The Builder has methods like buildRound(), buildRect() and buildRoundRect() for making drawable round, rectangle and rectangle with rounded corner respectively. Here we are using buildRect() to make the drawable rectangle.

TextDrawable drawable = OpenEventApp.getTextDrawableBuilder()
                    .buildRect(Utils.getNameLetters(name), ColorGenerator.MATERIAL.getColor(name));

The buildRect() method takes two arguments one is String text which will be used as a text in the drawable and second is int color which will be used as a background color of the drawable. Here ColorGenerator.MATERIAL returns material color for given string.

4.  Create getNameLetters()  method

The getNameLetters(String name) method should return the first letters of the first name and last name as String.

Example, if the name is “Shailesh Baldaniya” then it will return “SB”.

public static String getNameLetters(String name) {
        if (isEmpty(name))
            return "#";

        String[] strings = name.split(" ");
        StringBuilder nameLetters = new StringBuilder();
        for (String s : strings) {
            if (nameLetters.length() >= 2)
                return nameLetters.toString().toUpperCase();
            if (!isEmpty(s)) {
                nameLetters.append(s.trim().charAt(0));
            }
        }
        return nameLetters.toString().toUpperCase();
}

Here we are using split method to get the first name and last name from the name. The charAt(0) gives the first character of the string. If the name string is null then it will return “#”.   

5.  Use Drawable

Now after creating the TextDrawable object we need to load it as a placeholder in the ImageView for this we are using Picasso library.

Picasso.with(context)
        .load(image-url)
        .placeholder(drawable)
        .error(drawable)
        .into(speakerImage);

Here the placeholder() method displays drawable while the image is being loaded. The error() method displays drawable when the requested image could not be loaded when the device is offline. SpeakerImage is an ImageView in which we want to load the image.

Conclusion

TextDrawable is a great library for generating Drawable with text. It has also support for animations, font and shapes. To know more about TextDrawable follow the links given below.

Email and Password Validation in Open Event Android

The Open Event API Server exposes a well documented JSONAPI compliant REST API that can be used in The Open Even Android and Frontend. The Open Event API Server enables the Android and web clients to add the user authentication (sign up/login) in the project. In the process of signing up or logging in user it is needed to validate email and password entered by the user and show the error to give better user experience. In this post I explain how to validate email and password entered by the user using TextInputLayout.

1. Add TextInputLayout

TextInputLayout wraps an EditText (or descendant) to show a floating label when the hint is hidden due to the user inputting text. Add TextInputLayout for email field in the layout as given below.

<android.support.design.widget.TextInputLayout
            android:id="@+id/text_input_layout_email"
            android:layout_width="match_parent"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content">

            <android.support.v7.widget.AppCompatEditText
                android:layout_width="match_parent"
                android:layout_height="wrap_content"
                android:hint="@string/email"
                android:inputType="textEmailAddress" />
</android.support.design.widget.TextInputLayout>

Here the hint attribute is used to display hint in the floating label. Specify the input type so the system displays the appropriate soft input method (such as an on-screen keyboard) for the field. For email EditText we are using textEmailAddress input type. Similarly add TextInputLayout for the password field. The input type for the password is textPassword.

2.  Create and initialize object

Now in the activity create and initialize TextInputLayout and EditText objects for email and password.

@BindView(R.id.text_input_layout_email)
TextInputLayout mTextInputLayoutEmail;
@BindView(R.id.text_input_layout_password)
TextInputLayout mTextInputLayoutPassword;

@Override
protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    ButterKnife.bind(this);

    private AppCompatEditText mEditTextEmail = (AppCompatEditText) mTextInputLayoutEmail.getEditText();
    private AppCompatEditText mEditTextPassword = (AppCompatEditText) mTextInputLayoutPassword.getEditText();
}

Here we are using ButterKnife for binding views with fields. The getEditText() method returns the EditText view used for text input inside the TextInputLayout.

3.  Create validate() method

Create validate() method which takes two arguments. The first is email and the second password. It will return true if the email and password are valid else false.

private boolean validate(String email, String password) {

        // Reset errors.
        mTextInputLayoutEmail.setError(null);
        mTextInputLayoutPassword.setError(null);

        if (Utils.isEmpty(email)) {
            mTextInputLayoutEmail.setError("Email is required");
            return false;
        } else if (!Utils.isEmailValid(email)) {
            mTextInputLayoutEmail.setError("Enter a valid email");
            return false;
        }

        if (Utils.isEmpty(password)) {
            mTextInputLayoutPassword.setError("Password is required");
            return false;
        } else if (!Utils.isPasswordValid(password)) {
            mTextInputLayoutPassword.setError("Password must contain at least 6 characters");
            return false;
        }

        return true;
}

Here it first resets the error for the TextInputLayout by setting it to null. Then it checks email string if it is empty then it will show “Email is required” error using setError() method.

4.  Create isEmailValid() and isPasswordValid() method

Now create isEmailValid() and isPasswordvalid() method which is used by validate() method. The isEmailValid() method should take email string as an argument and return boolean indicating whether the email is valid or not. The isEmailValid() method uses Pattern and Matcher class to determine if the pattern of input is email or not. The isPasswordValid() method should take password string as an argument and return true if the password is satisfying minimum condition. Here in our case length of the password should be minimum 6.

public static boolean isEmailValid(String email){
        Pattern pattern = Patterns.EMAIL_ADDRESS;
        Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(email);
        return matcher.matches();
}

//Check password with minimum requirement here(it should be minimum 6 characters)
public static boolean isPasswordValid(String password){
        return password.length() >= 6;
}

5.  Use validate() method

Now we are ready to use validate() method when signing up or logging in the user. The getText() method of EditText will return text input.

String email = mEditTextEmail.getText().toString();
String password = mEditTextPassword.getText().toString();

if (validate(email, password)) {
    //Sign up or login User
}

Conclusion

Using TextInputLayout with floating hint label and error handling gives awesome UI and UX.

Using Lombok to Reduce Boilerplate Code in Open Event Android App

The Open Even App Android project contains data/model classes like Event, Track, Session, Speaker etc which are used to fetch data from the server and store data in the database. Each model contains private fields, getters, setters and toString() method which are used to change data of the object, access data of the object, logging and debugging. Adding all these methods manually makes the code boilerplate.

In this blog post I explain how to use Lombok to reduce boilerplate code in the model class.

Add dependency

To set up Lombok for your application you have to add the dependency in your app module’s build.gradle file.

dependencies {
	provided   "org.projectlombok:lombok:1.16.18"
}

Install Lombok plugin

In addition to setting up your gradle project correctly, you need to add the Lombok IntelliJ plugin to add Lombok support to Android Studio

  1. Go to File > Settings > Plugins
  2. Click on Browse repositories
  3. Search for Lombok Plugin
  4. Click on Install plugin
  5. Restart Android Studio

Write model class

Lombok has annotations to generate Getters, Setters, Constructors, toString(), Equal() and hashCode() methods.

@Getter,  @Setter, @ToString, @EqualsAndHashCode

@Data is a shortcut annotation that bundles the features of @Getter, @Setter, @ToString and @EqualsAndHashCode

Here I am only defining track model because of its simplicity and less complexity.

@Data
public class Track {

    private int id;
    private String name;
    private String description;
    private String color;
    private String fontColor;
    private RealmList<Session> sessions;
}

Create and use object

After defining models you can create an instance of the object and you will notice that you can access all the getters and setters.

Track track = new Track();
track.setName("Android");

String name = track.getName(); // here value of name will be "Android" 

You can also specify which fields to include and exclude in the toString(), equals() and hashCode() methods using @ToString, @EqualsAndHashCode annotation.

@ToString(of={"id", "name"})

@ToString(exclude="color")

@EqualsAndHashCode(of={"id", "name"})

@EqualsAndHashCode(exclude={"color", "fontColor"})

Constructors

Lombok has three methods to generator constructors

  • @NoArgsConstructor: It generates constructor with no parameters
  • @RequiredArgsConstructor: It generates a constructor with 1 parameter for each field that requires special handling.
  • @AllArgsConstructor: It generates a constructor with 1 parameter for each field in your class.

Conclusion

As you can see, Lombok uses succinct annotations to generate methods such as getters, setters, and constructors. It can easily help you get rid of hundreds of lines of boilerplate code. Lombok also allows you to make your code more expressive, concise and can help you avoid some bugs. To learn more about Lombok project follow the links given below.

Creating SharedPreferences Util in Open Event Android

In the Open Event Android we have the fragment for schedule, speakers which has the option to sort the list. Schedule Fragment have the option to sort by Title, Tracks and  Start Time. Speakers Fragment has the option to sort by Name, Organization and Country. If the user preferred to sort by name then it should always sort the list by name whenever the user uses the app. For this we need to store user preference for sorting list. Another part of the app like Live feed, About fragment also needs to store event id, facebook page id/name etc.

In Android there is a SharedPreferences class to store key value pair in the App specific storage. To store data in SharedPreferences we need to create SharedPreferences Object in different activities and fragment. In this post I explain how to create SharedPreferences Util which can be used to store key value pairs from all over the App.

1. Create SharedPreferencesUtil Class

The first step is to create SharedPreferncesUtil.java file which will contain static SharedPreferences object.

public class SharedPreferencesUtil {
    ...
}

2. Create static objects

Create static SharedPreferences and SharedPreferences.Editor object in the SharedPreferncesUtil.java file.

private static SharedPreferences sharedPreferences;
private static SharedPreferences.Editor editor;

3. Initialize objects

Now after creating objects initialize them in the static block. The code inside static block is executed only once: The first time you make an object of that class or the first time you access a static member of that class.

static {
        sharedPreferences = OpenEventApp.getAppContext().getSharedPreferences(ConstantStrings.FOSS_PREFS, Context.MODE_PRIVATE);
        editor = sharedPreferences.edit();
}

 

Here make sure to use the Application context to avoid a memory leak. The getSharedPreferences() method takes two arguments name of the shared preference and mode. Here we are using Context.MODE_PRIVATE File creation mode where the created file can only be accessed by the calling application.

4. Add methods

Now create static methods to store data so that we can use these methods directly from the other activities or classes. Here I am only adding methods for integer you can add more methods for String, long, boolean etc.

public static void putInt(String key, int value) {
        editor.putInt(key, value).apply();
}

public static int getInt(String key, int defaultValue) {
        return sharedPreferences.getInt(key, defaultValue);
}

5. Use SharedPreferencesUtil class

Now we are ready to use this Util class to store key value pair in SharedPreferences.

SharedPreferencesUtil.putInt(ConstantStrings.PREF_SORT, sortType);

Here the putInt() methods take two arguments one the key and second the value. To get the stored value use getInt() method.

SharedPreferencesUtil.getInt(ConstantStrings.PREF_SORT, 0);

To know more how I solved this issue in Open Event Project visit this link.

Adding JSONAPI Support in Open Event Android App

The Open Event API Server exposes a well documented JSONAPI compliant REST API that can be used in The Open Even App Generator and Frontend to access and manipulate data. So it is also needed to add support of JSONAPI in external services like The Open Even App Generator and Frontend. In this post I explain how to add JSONAPI support in Android.

There are many client libraries to implement JSONAPI support in Android or Java like moshi-jsonapi, morpheus etc. You can find the list here. The main problem is most of the libraries require to inherit attributes from Resource model but in the Open Event Android App we already inherit from a RealmObject class and in Java we can’t inherit from more than one model or class. So we will be using the jsonapi-converter library which uses annotation processing to add JSONAPI support.

1. Add dependency

In order to use jsonapi-converter in your app add following dependencies in your app module’s build.gradle file.

dependencies {
	compile 'com.github.jasminb:jsonapi-converter:0.7'
}

2.  Write model class

Models will be used to represent requests and responses. To support JSONAPI we need to take care of followings when writing the models.

  • Each model class must be annotated with com.github.jasminb.jsonapi.annotations.Type annotation
  • Each class must contain a String attribute annotated with com.github.jasminb.jsonapi.annotations.Id annotation
  • All relationships must be annotated with com.github.jasminb.jsonapi.annotations.Relationship annotation

In the Open Event Android we have so many models like event, session, track, microlocation, speaker etc. Here I am only defining track model because of its simplicity and less complexity.

@Type("track")
public class Track extends RealmObject {

        	@Id(IntegerIdHandler.class)
        	private int id;
        	private String name;
        	private String description;
        	private String color;
        	private String fontColor;
        	@Relationship("sessions")
        	private RealmList<Session> sessions;

        	//getters and setters
}

Jsonapi-converter uses Jackson for data parsing. To know how to use Jackson for parsing follow my previous blog.

Type annotation is used to instruct the serialization/deserialization library on how to process given model class. Each resource must have the id attribute. Id annotation is used to flag an attribute of a class as an id attribute. In above class the id attribute is int so we need to specify IntegerIdHandler class which is ResourceHandler in the annotation. Relationship annotation is used to designate other resource types as a relationship. The value in the Relationship annotation should be as per JSONAPI specification of the server. In the Open Event Project each track has the sessions so we need to add a Relationship annotation for it.

3.  Setup API service and retrofit

After defining models, define API service interface as you would usually do with standard JSON APIs.

public interface OpenEventAPI {
    @GET("tracks?include=sessions&fields[session]=title")
    Call<List<Track>> getTracks();
}

Now create an ObjectMapper & a retrofit object and initialize them.

ObjectMapper objectMapper = OpenEventApp.getObjectMapper();
Class[] classes = {Track.class, Session.class};

OpenEventAPI openEventAPI = new Retrofit.Builder()
                    .client(okHttpClient)
                    .baseUrl(Urls.BASE_URL)
                    .addConverterFactory(new JSONAPIConverterFactory(objectMapper, classes))
                    .build()
                    .create(OpenEventAPI.class);

 

The classes array instance contains a list of all the model classes which will be supported by this retrofit builder and API service. Here the main task is to add a JSONAPIConverterFactory which will be used to serialize and deserialize data according to JSONAPI specification. The JSONAPIConverterFactory constructor takes two parameters ObjectMapper and list of classes.

4.  Use API service  

Now after setting up all the things according to above steps, you can use the openEventAPI instance to fetch data from the server.

openEventAPI.getTracks();

Conclusion

JSON API is designed to minimize both the number of requests and the amount of data transmitted between clients and servers

Adding Unit Test For Local JSON Parsing in Open Event Android App

The Open Event project uses JSON format for transferring event information like tracks, sessions, microlocations and other. The event exported in the zip format from the Open Event server also contains the data in JSON format. The Open Event Android application uses this JSON data. Before we use this data in the app, we have to parse the data to get Java objects that can be used for populating views. There is a chance that the model and the JSON format changes in future. It is necessary that the models are able to parse the JSON data and the change in the model or JSON format don’t break JSON parsing.  In this post I explain how to unit test local JSON parsing so that we can ensure that the models are able to parse the local JSON sample data successfully.

Firstly we need to access assets from the main source set into the unit test. There is no way to directly access assets from main source set. We need to first add assets in test/resources directory. If assets are present in test/resources directory then we can use it using ClassLoader in the unit test. But we can’t just copy assets from the main source set to resources directory. If there is any change in sample JSON then we need to maintain both resources and it may make the sample inconsistent. We need to make assets shared.

Add the following code in the app level build.gradle file.

android {
    ...
    sourceSets.test.resources.srcDirs += ["src/main/assets"]
}

It will add src/main/assets as a source directory for test/resources directory.So after building the project the test will have access to the assets.

Create readFile() method

Now create a method readFile(String name) which takes a filename as a parameter and returns data of the file as a string.

private String readFile(String name) throws IOException {
        String json = "";
        try {
            InputStream inputStream = this.getClass().getClassLoader().getResourceAsStream(name);
            int size = inputStream.available();
            byte[] buffer = new byte[size];
            inputStream.read(buffer);
            inputStream.close();
            json = new String(buffer, "UTF-8");
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        return json;
}

Here the getResourceAsStream() function is used to open file as a InputStream. Then we are creating byte array object of size same as inputStream data. Using read function we are storing data of file into byte array. After this we are creating a String object using a byte array.

Create ObjectMapper object

Create and initialize an ObjectMapper object in the Test class.

private ObjectMapper objectMapper;

    @Before
    public void setUp() {
        objectMapper = OpenEventApp.getObjectMapper();
        objectMapper.configure(DeserializationFeature.FAIL_ON_UNKNOWN_PROPERTIES, true);
}

Here setting DeserializationFeature.FAIL_ON_UNKNOWN_PROPERTIES to true is very important. It will fail the test for any unrecognized fields in the sample.

Create doModelDeserialization() method

In the Open Event Android App we are using Jackson for JSON serialization and deserialization. Converting JSON data to java is called deserialization or parsing.

Now create doModelDeserialization() method which takes three parameters,

  • Class<T> type: Model Class type of the data
  • String name: Name of the JSON data file
  • boolean isList: true if JSON string contains the list of object else false

This method returns true if parsing is successful and false if there is any error in parsing.

private <T> boolean doModelDeserialization(Class<T> type, String name, boolean isList) throws IOException {
        if (isList) {
            List<T> items = objectMapper.readValue(readFile(name), objectMapper.getTypeFactory().constructCollectionType(List.class, type));
            if (items == null)
                return false;
        } else {
            T item = objectMapper.readValue(readFile(name), type);
            if (item == null)
                return false;
        }
        return true;
}

Here ObjectMapper is doing the main work of parsing data and returns parsed object using readValue() method.

Add Test

Now all the setup is done we just need to assert value returned by doModelDeserialization() method by passing appropriate parameters.

@Test
public void testLocalJsonDeserialization() throws IOException {
        assertTrue(doModelDeserialization(Event.class, "event", false));
        assertTrue(doModelDeserialization(Microlocation.class, "microlocations", true));
        assertTrue(doModelDeserialization(Sponsor.class, "sponsors", true));
        assertTrue(doModelDeserialization(Track.class, "tracks", true));
        assertTrue(doModelDeserialization(SessionType.class, "session_types", true));
        assertTrue(doModelDeserialization(Session.class, "sessions", true));
        assertTrue(doModelDeserialization(Speaker.class, "speakers", true));
}

Here only event JSON file doesn’t have a list of the objects so passing false as isList parameter for others we are passing true because its data contains a list of objects.

Conclusion:

Running unit tests after every build helps you to quickly catch and fix software regressions introduced by code changes to your app

Generic Social Links Implementation in Open Event Android App

The Open Event Android App has an About Fragment which displays all the info about the event like name, time, location etc. It also shows social media buttons for the event. The problem was that the implementation of showing the social media buttons was not generic. The implementation was working fine for current FOSSASIA sample. If we generate the app for other events it creates a problem. It shows static buttons without proper mapping from social media button to social media link which creates a problem like on clicking GitHub button it opens Facebook link (issue #1792).

One solution to this problem is to implement recyclerview with social media buttons. In this post I explain how I have made social links implementation generic using RecyclerView.

Add RecyclerView in layout

The first step to do is to add recyclerview in the layout xml file and to create a list item for recyclerview which holds the image for the social link button. Then in the About Fragment find recyclerview element added in the xml file using findFragmentById() method.

1. Add recyclerview in xml file

In the layout xml file of About Fragment add recyclerview element. Define id, width, height, and gravity of recyclerview. Then specify list item for recyclerview using listitem attribute.

<android.support.v7.widget.RecyclerView
            android:id="@+id/list_social_links"
            android:layout_width="wrap_content"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content"
            android:layout_gravity="center"
            android:overScrollMode="never"
            android:clipToPadding="false"
            tools:listitem="@layout/item_social_link" />

2. Create item_social_link.xml

Now create a item_social_link.xml file and add a FrameLayout element. Inside the FrameLayout add an ImageView with appropriate id, width, height and padding.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<FrameLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:id="@+id/layout_social_link_parent"
    android:layout_width="wrap_content"
    android:layout_height="wrap_content">

    <ImageView
        android:id="@+id/img_social_link"
        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:background="?attr/selectableItemBackgroundBorderless"
        android:contentDescription="@string/social_link"
        android:padding="@dimen/padding_large"
        android:tint="@color/white" />
</FrameLayout>

Add and initialize RecyclerView

After adding recyclerview in xml file we need to add RecyclerView field in the About Fragment java file. Now add and initialize SocialLinksListAdapter which extends RecyclerView.Adapter and will be used for populating the recyclerview with the social links.

@BindView(R.id.list_social_links)
protected RecyclerView socialLinksRecyclerView;

private SocialLinksListAdapter socialLinksListAdapter;
private List<SocialLink> mSocialLinks = new ArrayList<>();

Here mSocialLinks is the list of social links which is fetched from the Event object.

Create ViewHolder for social link button

Now create SocialLinkViewHolder which extends RecyclerView.ViewHolder and holds one social link item defined in item_social_link.xml file. This file is where the magic happens. Add ImageView, FrameLayout, SocialLink and context fields in it.

public class SocialLinkViewHolder extends RecyclerView.ViewHolder {

    @BindView(R.id.img_social_link)
    protected ImageView imageView;

    @BindView(R.id.layout_social_link_parent)
    protected FrameLayout layout;

    private SocialLink socialLink;
    private Context context;

    public SocialLinkViewHolder(View itemView, Context context) {
        super(itemView);
        ButterKnife.bind(this, itemView);
        this.context = context;
    }

    public void bindSocialLink(@NonNull SocialLink socialLink) {...}

    private void setImageDrawable(@NonNull String name,@NonNull String link) {...}

    private Drawable getDrawable(@DrawableRes int id) {...}

    private void showView(boolean show) {...}
}

The bindSocialLink(SocialLink socialLink) method is called in the onBindViewHolder() method of the SocialLinksListAdapter. In this method initialize socialLink field and set drawable for ImageView according to SocialLink name using setImageDrawable() method.

public void bindSocialLink(@NonNull SocialLink socialLink) {
        this.socialLink = socialLink;
        setImageDrawable(socialLink.getName(), socialLink.getLink());
}

The setImageDrawable() method finds and sets appropriate image for social link button using the name of the social link. If the image for the social link is not found then it sets the visibility of the image view to GONE using showView(boolean show).

private void setImageDrawable(@NonNull String name,@NonNull String link) {

        if (Utils.isEmpty(name) || Utils.isEmpty(link) || Utils.getSocialLinkDrawableId(name) == 1) {
            showView(false);
            return;
        }
        imageView.setImageDrawable(getDrawable(Utils.getSocialLinkDrawableId(name)));
}

The showView(boolean show) method handles visibility of ImageView and ImageView’s parent FrameLayout using setVisibility() method.

private void showView(boolean show) {
        if (show) {
            imageView.setVisibility(View.VISIBLE);
            layout.setVisibility(View.VISIBLE);
        } else {
            imageView.setVisibility(View.GONE);
            layout.setVisibility(View.GONE);
        }
}

Set onClickListener to ImageView

Now it’s time to set the onClickListener in the constructor of the SocialLinkViewHolder to define what to do when user clicks on the ImageView.

imageView.setOnClickListener(view -> {
            if (socialLink != null && !Utils.isEmpty(socialLink.getLink())) {
                Utils.setUpCustomTab(context, socialLink.getLink());
            }
        });

Here we are setting custom tab for the social link using the setUpCustomTab() util method which will open the link.

Now run the app on the device or emulator. Here’s how it looks like,

Conclusion

The SocialLink impementation using the RecyclerView gives the great user experience in the application.

Additional resources