Modifying SUSI Skills using SUSI Skill CMS

SUSI Skill CMS is a complete solution right from creating a skill to modifying the skill. The skills in SUSI are well synced with the remote repository and can be completely modified using the Edit Skill feature of SUSI Skill CMS. Here’s how to Modify a Skill.

  1. Sign Up/Login to the website using your credentials in skills.susi.ai
  2. Choose the SKill which you want to edit and click on the pencil icon.
  3. The following screen allows editing the skill. One can change the Group, Language, Skill Name, Image and the content as well.
  4. After making the changes the commit message can be added to Save the changes.

To achieve the above steps we require the following API Endpoints of the SUSI Server.

  1. http://api.susi.ai/cms/getSkillMetadata.json – This gives us the meta data which populates the various Skill Content, Image, Author etc.
  2. http://api.susi.ai/cms/getAllLanguages.json – This gives us all the languages of a Skill Group.
  3. http://api.susi.ai/cms/getGroups.json – This gives us all the list of Skill Groups whether Knowledge, Entertainment, Smalltalk etc.

Now since we have all the APIs in place we make the following AJAX calls to update the Skill Process.

  1. Since we are detecting changes in all the fields (Group Value, Skill Name, Language Value, Image Value, Commit Message, Content changes and the format of the content), the AJAX call can only be sent when there is a change in the PR and there is no null or undefined value in them. For that, we make various form validations. They are as follows.
    1. We first detect whether the User is in a logged in state.
if (!cookies.get('loggedIn')) {
            notification.open({
                message: 'Not logged In',
                description: 'Please login and then try to create/edit a skill',
                icon: <Icon type="close-circle" style={{ color: '#f44336' }} />,
            });
        }
  1. We check whether the image uploaded matches the format of the Skill image to be stored which is ::image images/imageName.png
if (!new RegExp(/images\/\w+\.\w+/g).test(this.state.imageUrl)) {
            notification.open({
                message: 'Error Processing your Request',
                description: 'image must be in format of images/imageName.jpg',
                icon: <Icon type="close-circle" style={{ color: '#f44336' }} />,
            });
        }
  1. We check if the commit message is not null and notify the user if he forgot to add a message.
if (this.state.commitMessage === null) {
            notification.open({
                message: 'Please make some changes to save the Skill',
                icon: <Icon type="close-circle" style={{ color: '#f44336' }} />,
            });
        }
  1. We also check whether the old values of the skill are completely similar to the new ones, in this case, we do not send the request.
if (toldValues===newValues {
            notification.open({
                message: 'Please make some changes to save the Skill',
                icon: <Icon type="close-circle" style={{ color: '#f44336' }} />,
            });
        }

To check out the complete code, go to this link.

  1. Next, if the above validations are successful, we send a POST request to the server and show the notification to the user accordingly, whether the changes to the Skill Data have been updated or not. Here’s the AJAX call snippet.
// create a form object
let form = new FormData();       
/* Append the following fields from the Skill Component:- OldModel, OldLanguage, OldSkill, NewModel, NewGroup, NewLanguage, NewSkill, changelog, content, imageChanged, old_image_name, new_image_name, image_name_changed, access_token */  
if (image_name_changed) {
            file = this.state.file;
            // append file to image
        }

        let settings = {
            "async": true,
            "crossDomain": true,
            "url": "http://api.susi.ai/cms/modifySkill.json",
            "method": "POST",
            "processData": false,
            "contentType": false,
            "mimeType": "multipart/form-data",
            "data": form
        };
        $.ajax(settings)..done(function (response) {
         //show success
        }.
        .fail(function(response){
         // show failure
        }
  1. To verify all this we head to the commits section of the SUSI Skill Data repo and see the changes we made. The changes can be seen here https://github.com/fossasia/susi_skill_data/commits/master 

Resources

  1. AJAX POST Request – https://api.jquery.com/jquery.post/ 
  2. Material UI – http://material-ui.com 
  3. Notifications – http://www.material-ui.com/#/components/notification 

Reset SUSI.AI User Password & Parameter extraction from Link

In this blog I will discuss how does Accounts handle the incoming request to reset the password. If a user forgets his/her password, They can use forgot password button on http://accounts.susi.ai and It’s implementation is quite straightforward. As soon as a user enter his/her e-mail id and hits RESET button, an ajax call is made which first checks if the user email id is registered with SUSI.AI or not. If not, a failure message is thrown to user. But if the user is found to be registered in the database, An email is sent to him/her which contains a 30 characters long token. On the server token is hashed against the user’s email id and a validity of 7 days is set to it.
Let us have a look at the Reset Password link one receives.

http://accounts.susi.ai/?token={30 characters long token}

On clicking this link, what it does is that user is redirected to http://accounts.susi.ai with token as a request parameter. At the client side, A search is made which evaluates whether the URL has a token parameter or not. This was the overview. Since, http://accounts.susi.ai is based on ReactJS framework, it is not easy alike the native php functionality, but much more logical and systematic. Let us now take a closer look at how this parameter is searched for, token extracted and validated.

As you can see http://accounts.susi.ai and http://accounts.susi.ai/?token={token}, Both redirect the user to the same URL. So the first task that needs to be accomplished is check if a parameter is passed in the URL or not.
First import addUrlProps and UrlQueryParamTypes from react-url-query package and PropTypes from prop-types package. These will be required in further steps.
Have a look at the code and then we will understand it’s working.

const urlPropsQueryConfig = {
  token: { type: UrlQueryParamTypes.string },
};

class Login extends Component {
	static propTypes = {
    // URL props are automatically decoded and passed in based on the config
    token: PropTypes.string,
    // change handlers are automatically generated when given a config.
    // By default they update that single query parameter and maintain existing
    // values in the other parameters.
    onChangeToken: PropTypes.func,
  }

  static defaultProps = {
    token: "null",
  }

Above in the first step, we have defined by what parameter should the Reset Password triggered. It means, if and only if the incoming parameter in the URL is token, we move to next step, otherwise normal http://accounts.susi.ai page should be rendered. Also we have defined the data type of the token parameter to be UrlQueryParamTypes.string.
PropTypes are attributes in ReactJS similar to tags in HTML. So again, we have defined the data type. onChangeToken is a custom attribute which is fired whenever token parameter is modified. To declare default values, we have used defaultProps function. If token is not passed in the URL, by default it makes it null. This is still not the last step. Till now we have not yet checked if token is there or not. This is done in the componentDidMount function. componentDidMount is a function which gets called before the client renders the page. In this function, we will check that if the value of token is not equal to null, then a value must have been passed to it. If the value of token is not equal to null, it extracts the token from the URL and redirects user to reset password application. Below is the code snippet for better understanding.

componentDidMount() {
		const {
      token
    } = this.props;
		console.log(token)
		if(token !== "null") {
			this.props.history.push('/resetpass/?token='+token);
		}
		if(cookies.get('loggedIn')) {
			this.props.history.push('/userhome', { showLogin: false });
		}
	}

With this the first step of the process has been achieved. Again in the second step, we extract the token from the URL in the similar above fashion followed by an ajax request to the server which will validate the token and sends response to client accordingly {token might be invalid or expired}. Success is encoded in a JSON object and sent to client. Error is thrown as an error only and client shows an error of “invalid token”. If it is a success, it sends email id of the user against which the token was hashed and the client displays it on the page. Now user has to enter new password and confirm it. Client also tests whether both the fields have same values or not. If they are same, a simple ajax call is made to server with new password and the email id and token. If no error is caused in between (like connection timeout, server might be down etc), client is sent a JSON response again with “accepted” flag = true and message as “Your password has been changed!”.

Additional Resources:

(npmjs – official documentation of create-react-apps)

(Fortnox developer’s blog post)

(Dave Ceddia’s blog post for new ReactJS developers)

Implementing Login Functionality in SUSI Web Chat

SUSI Web Chat is fully equipped with all the accounting features which are being provided by the SUSI.AI API. This blog discloses all the API features one needs to know to embed the Login functionality in SUSI Web Chat.

  1. To embed the Login feature, first we create a form using material-ui.com components with the followng fields
    1. Email
    2. Password
    3. Note: We can also chose a Custom Server while logging in, here I have used the Standard Server ie. http://api.susi.ai to make the user Login

The form can be made with the help of the following fields

  • TextField for Email, props to be passed
    • Name – email
    • Value – this.state.email which gets the value of the current email
    • floatingLabelText is Email,
    • errorText is the message which we want to show when the email does not match the regex or its empty.

Code Snippet –

<TextField name="email" value={this.state.email} onChange={this.handleChange} errorText={this.emailErrorMessage}    floatingLabelText="Email" />
  • PasswordField for Password
    • Name – password
    • Value – this.state.password which gets the value of the current email
    • floatingLabelText is Password,
    • errorText is the message which we want to show when the password is not filled.

Code Snippet-

<PasswordField name='password' value={this.state.password} onChange={this.handleChange} errorText={this.passwordErrorMessage}   floatingLabelText='Password' />
  • The next elements are RadioButton groups taken from material-ui.com. This ensures the user signs into a standard server or even to a custom server. This is not compulsory as of now.
  • And lastly we need a submit button, which is disabled until all the fields are filled.

Code Snippet –

<RaisedButton label="Login" type="submit" labelColor="#fff" disable={!this.state.validForm} />

For the full form, check out this file at Login.react.js

  1. A Sample UI could be as shown in the image
  2. Next after creating the Login Screen, we make the onSubmit prop which is to be hooked up with another function called handleSubmit. An example code snippet from Login.react.js
 handleSubmit = (e) => {
        e.preventDefault();
        // Get the trimmed values from the fields
        var email = this.state.email.trim();
        var password = this.state.password.trim();
        // Set the default server to login
        let BASE_URL = defaults.Server;
            // handle all the details of the chosen server
        let serverUrl = this.state.serverUrl;
        if(serverUrl.slice(-1) === '/'){
            serverUrl = serverUrl.slice(0,-1);
        }
        if(serverUrl !== ''){
            BASE_URL = serverUrl;
        }
// if email and password is filled return true
        if (!email || !password) { return this.state.isFilled; }
// Check the regex of email
        let validEmail = /^[A-Z0-9._%+-][email protected][A-Z0-9.-]+\.[A-Z]{2,4}$/i.test(email); 
// Pass the parameters to the loginEndPoint
        let loginEndPoint =
            BASE_URL+'/aaa/login.json?type=access-token&login=' +
            this.state.email + '&password=' + this.state.password;
        // If email and password is filled and valid call AJAX
        if (email && validEmail) {
            // AJAX Calls
        }
    }
    1. Then we make the Ajax Calls and store the created token from hitting the URL at http://api.susi.ai/aaa/login.json?type=access-token&login=EMAIL&password=PASSWORD. We store the cookie in browser and generate a session for the user using a package ‘universal-cookies’.
$.ajax({
    url: loginEndPoint,
    dataType: 'jsonp',
    jsonpCallback: 'p',
    jsonp: 'callback',
    crossDomain: true,
    success: function (response) {
        cookies.set('serverUrl', BASE_URL, { path: '/' });
        let accessToken = response.access_token;
        let state = this.state;// Adding the current State
        let time = response.valid_seconds; // Get the valid time of the cookie
        state.isFilled = true; // Set isFilled to true
        state.accessToken = accessToken; // Get the token
        state.success = true; // Set Success to true
        state.msg = response.message; // Get the server message
        state.time = time; // Get the time in the state
        this.setState(state); // Set the  state with the values
/* Pass the token to the binding function handleOnSubmit passing the arguments - token and the valid time */
        this.handleOnSubmit(accessToken, time);
    }.bind(this),
    error: function (errorThrown) {
        let msg = 'Login Failed. Try Again';
        let state = this.state;
        state.msg = msg;
        this.setState(state);
    }.bind(this)
});

 

    1. We then fire up the handleOnSubmit(accessToken, time) which saves the token for the given expiration time from the server.

Here’s the sample code

handleOnSubmit = (loggedIn, time) => {
        let state = this.state;
        if (state.success) {
            cookies.set('loggedIn', loggedIn, { path: '/', maxAge: time }); // set the cookie in the browser to maintain the loggedIn state
            this.props.history.push('/', { showLogin: false });
            window.location.reload();// reload after the loggedIn cookie creation
        }
        else {
            this.setState({
                error: true,
                accessToken: '',
                success: false
            });
        }
    }
  1. We then check the access token and redirect him based on his login state. This is handled in MessageSection.react.js
import Cookies from 'universal-cookie';
const cookies = new Cookies();
if (cookies.get('loggedIn')) {
    //Show all functionalities of loggedIn state
}
else {
//Redirect user to login page
}

 

To have a look at the full project, visit https://github.com/fossasia/chat.susi.ai and feel free to contribute. To test the project visit http://chat.susi.ai

Resources