How to Store Mobile Settings in the Server from SUSI Web Chat Settings Page

While we are adding new features and capabilities to SUSI Web Chat application, we wanted to provide settings changing capability to SUSI users. SUSI team decided to maintain a settings page to give that capability to users.

This is how it’s interface looks like now.

In this blog post I’m going to add another setting category to our setting page. This one is for  saving mobile phone number and dial code in the server.

UI Development:

First we need to  add new category to settings page and it should be invisible when user is not logged in. Anonymous users should not get mobile phone category in settings page.

     let menuItems = cookies.get('loggedIn') ?
            <div>
                <div className="settings-list">
                    <Menu
                        onItemTouchTap={this.loadSettings}
                        selectedMenuItemStyle={blueThemeColor}
                        style={{ width: '100%' }}
                        value={this.state.selectedSetting}
                    >
                       <MenuItem value='Mobile' className="setting-item" leftIcon={<MobileIcon />}>Mobile<ChevronRight className="right-chevron" /></MenuItem>
                        <hr className="break-line" />
                    </Menu>
                </div>
            </div>

 

Next we have to show settings UI when user clicks on the category name.

 if (this.state.selectedSetting === 'Mobile' && cookies.get('loggedIn')) {}
                currentSetting = (
  <Translate text="Country/region : " />
                            <DropDownMenu maxHeight={300}
               value={this.state.countryCode?this.state.countryCode:'US'}

 

Show US if the state does not deines the country code

                                onChange={this.handleCountryChange}>
                                {countries}
                            </DropDownMenu>
<Translate text="Phone number : " />
                            <TextField name="selectedCountry"
                            disabled={true}
                            value={countryData.countries[this.state.countryCode?this.state.countryCode:'US'].countryCallingCodes[0] }
                         	/>
                            <TextField name="serverUrl"
                                onChange={this.handleTelephoneNoChange}
                                value={this.state.phoneNo }
 />
)}

 

Then we need to get list of country names and country dial codes to show in the above drop down. We used country-data node module for that.

To install country-data module use this  command.

npm install --save country-data

 

We have used it in the settings page as below.

import countryData from 'country-data';
    	countryData.countries.all.sort(function(a, b) {
            if(a.name < b.name){ return -1};
            if(a.name > b.name){ return 1};
            return 0;
        });
        let countries = countryData.countries.all.map((country, i) => {
         	return (<MenuItem value={countryData.countries.all[i].alpha2} key={i} primaryText={ countryData.countries.all[i].name+' '+ countryData.countries.all[i].countryCallingCodes[0] } />);
        });

 

First we sort the country data list from it’s name. After that we made a list of “”s from this list of data.
Then we have to check whether the user changed or added the phone number and region (dial code).
It handles by this function mentioned above. ( onChange={this.handleCountryChange}> and
onChange={this.handleTelephoneNoChange} )

    handleCountryChange = (event, index, value) => {
        this.setState({'countryCode': value });
    }

 

Then we have to get the phone number using below function.

    handleTelephoneNoChange = (event, value) => {
        this.setState({'phoneNo': value});
    }

 

Next we have to update the function that triggers when user clicks the save button.

    handleSubmit = () => {
        let newCountryCode = !this.state.countryCode?
        this.intialSettings.countryCode:this.state.countryCode;
        let newCountryDialCode = !this.state.countryDialCode?
        this.intialSettings.countryDialCode:this.state.countryDialCode;
        let newPhoneNo = this.state.phoneNo;
        let vals = {
            countryCode: newCountryCode,
            countryDialCode: newCountryDialCode,
            phoneNo: newPhoneNo
}
let settings = Object.assign({}, vals);
cookies.set('settings', settings);
 this.implementSettings(vals);
 }

 

This code snippet stores Country Code, Country Dial code and phone no in the server.
Now we have to update the Store. Here we are going to change UserPreferencesStore “UserPreferencesStore” .
First we have to setup default values for things we are going to store.

let _defaults = {
	  CountryCode: 'US',
   	  CountryDialCode: '+1',
   	  PhoneNo: ''
}

 

Finally we have to update the dispatchToken to change and get these new data

UserPreferencesStore.dispatchToken = ChatAppDispatcher.register(action => {
   switch (action.type) {
       case ActionTypes.SETTINGS_CHANGED: {
           let settings = action.settings;
           if(settings.hasOwnProperty('theme')){
                   _defaults.Theme = settings.theme;
           }
           if(settings.hasOwnProperty('countryDialCode')){
               _defaults.countryDialCode = settings.countryDialCode;
           }
           if(settings.hasOwnProperty('phoneNo')){
               _defaults.phoneNo = settings.phoneNo;
           }
           if(settings.hasOwnProperty('countryCode')){
               _defaults.countryCode = settings.countryCode;
           }
           UserPreferencesStore.emitChange();
           break;
}
}

 

Finally application is ready to store and update Mobile phone number and region code in the server.

Resources:

Adding Tweet Streaming Feature in World Mood Tracker loklak App

The World Mood Tracker was added to loklak apps with the feature to display aggregated data from the emotion classifier of loklak server. The next step in the app was adding the feature to display the stream of Tweets from a country as they are discovered by loklak. With the addition of stream servlet in loklak, it was possible to utilise it in this app.

In this blog post, I will be discussing the steps taken while adding to introduce this feature in World Mood Tracker app.

Props for WorldMap component

The WorldMap component holds the view for the map displayed in the app. This is where API calls to classifier endpoint are made and results are displayed on the map. In order to display tweets on clicking a country, we need to define react props so that methods from higher level components can be called.

In order to enable props, we need to change the constructor for the component –

export default class WorldMap extends React.Component {
    constructor(props) {
        super(props);
        ...
    }
    ...
}

[SOURCE]

We can now pass the method from parent component to enable streaming and other components can close the stream by using props in them –

export default class WorldMoodTracker extends React.Component {
    ...
    showStream(countryName, countryCode) {
        /* Do something to enable streaming component */
        ...
    }
 
    render() {
        return (
             ...
                <WorldMap showStream={this.showStream}/>
             ...
        )
    }
}

[SOURCE]

Defining Actions on Clicking Country Map

As mentioned in an earlier blog post, World Mood Tracker uses Datamaps to visualize data on a map. In order to trigger a piece of code on clicking a country, we can use the “done” method of the Datamaps instance. This is where we use the props passed earlier –

done: function(datamap) {
    datamap.svg.selectAll('.datamaps-subunit').on('click', function (geography) {
        props.showStream(geography.properties.name, reverseCountryCode(geography.id));
    })
}

[SOURCE]

The name and ID for the country will be used to display name and make API call to stream endpoint respectively.

The StreamOverlay Component

The StreamOverlay components hold all the utilities to display the stream of Tweets from loklak. This component is used from its parent components whose state holds info about displaying this component –

export default class WorldMoodTracker extends React.Component {
    ...
    getStreamOverlay() {
        if (this.state.enabled) {
            return (<StreamOverlay
                show={true} channel={this.state.channel}
                country={this.state.country} onClose={this.onOverlayClose}/>);
        }
    }

    render() {
        return (
            ...
                {this.getStreamOverlay()}
            ...
        )
    }
}

[SOURCE]

The corresponding props passed are used to render the component and connect to the stream from loklak server.

Creating Overlay Modal

On clicking the map, an overlay is shown. To display this overlay, react-overlays is used. The Modal component offered by the packages provides a very simple interface to define the design and interface of the component, including style, onclose hook, etc.

import {Modal} from 'react-overlays';

<Modal aria-labelledby='modal-label'
    style={modalStyle}
    backdropStyle={backdropStyle}
    show={true}
    onHide={this.close}>
    <div style={dialogStyle()}>
        ...
    </div>
</Modal>

[SOURCE]

It must be noted that modalStyle and backdropStyle are React style objects.

Dialog Style

The dialog style is defined to provide some space at the top, clicking where, the overlay is closed. To do this, vertical height units are used –

const dialogStyle = function () {
    return {
        position: 'absolute',
        width: '100%',
        top: '5vh',
        height: '95vh',
        padding: 20
        ...
    };
};

[SOURCE]

Connecting to loklak Tweet Stream

loklak sends Server Sent Events to clients connected to it. To utilise this stream, we can use the natively supported EventSource object. Event stream is started with the render method of the StreamOverlay component –

render () {
    this.startEventSource(this.props.channel);
    ...
}

[SOURCE]

This channel is used to connect to twitter/country/<country-ID> channel on the stream and then this can be passed to EventStream constructor. On receiving a message, a list of Tweets is appended and later rendered in the view –

startEventSource(country) {
    let channel = 'twitter%2Fcountry%2F' + country;
    if (this.eventSource) {
        return;
    }
    this.eventSource = new EventSource(host + '/api/stream.json?channel=' + channel);
    this.eventSource.onmessage = (event) => {
        let json = JSON.parse(event.data);
        this.state.tweets.push(json);
        if (this.state.tweets.length > 250) {
            this.state.tweets.shift();
        }
        this.setState(this.state);
    };
}

[SOURCE]

The size of the list is restricted to 250 here, so when a newer Tweet comes in, the oldest one is chopped off. And thanks to fast DOM actions in React, the rendering doesn’t take much time.

Rendering Tweets

The Tweets are displayed as simple cards on which user can click to open it on Twitter in a new tab. It contains basic information about the Tweet – screen name and Tweet text. Images are not rendered as it would make no sense to load them when Tweets are coming at a high rate.

function getTweetHtml(json) {
    return (
        <div style={{padding: '5px', borderRadius: '3px', border: '1px solid black', margin: '10px'}}>
            <a href={json.link} target="_blank">
            <div style={{marginBottom: '5px'}}>
                <b>@{json['screen_name']}</b>
            </div>
            <div style={{overflowX: 'hidden'}}>{json['text']}</div>
            </a>
        </div>
    )
}

[SOURCE]

They are rendered using a simple map in the render method of StreamOverlay component –

<div className={styles.container} style={{'height': '100%', 'overflowY': 'auto',
    'overflowX': 'hidden', maxWidth: '100%'}}>
    {this.state.tweets.reverse().map(getTweetHtml)}
</div>

[SOURCE]

Closing Overlay

With the previous setup in place, we can now see Tweets from the loklak backend as they arrive. But the problem is that we will still be connected to the stream when we click-close the modal. Also, we would need to close the overlay from the parent component in order to stop rendering it.

We can use the onclose method for the Modal here –

close() {
    if (this.eventSource) {
        this.eventSource.close();
        this.eventSource = null;
    }
    this.props.onClose();
}

[SOURCE]

Here, props.onClose() disables rendering of StreamOverlay in the parent component.

Conclusion

In this blog post, I explained how the flow of props are used in the World Mood Tracker app to turn on and off the streaming in the overlay defined using react-overlays. This feature shows a basic setup for using the newly introduced stream API in loklak.

The motivation of such application was taken from emojitracker by mroth as mentioned in fossasia/labs.fossasia.org#136. The changes were proposed in fossasia/apps.loklak.org#315 by @singhpratyush (me).

The app can be accessed live at https://singhpratyush.github.io/world-mood-tracker/index.html.

Resources

Displaying Blog Posts on SUSI AI Web Chat’s Blog Page and Share Posts

FOSSASIA is maintaining a superior blog and it contains blog posts about projects and programs run by FOSSASIA. While we were implementing SUSI Web Chat Application we got a requirement to implement a blog page. Speciality of this blog page is it is not a separate blog page, it fetches blog posts and other related data by filtering the FOSSASIA’s main blog.

In this blog post I’ll discuss how we fetched and managed those data on front-end and how we made the appearance same as the FOSSASIA main blog.

First we get blog posts as a JSON. For that we used rss2json API. we can get the RSS feed as a JSON by sending our RSS feed URL to the rss2json API. Check the rss2json API documentation here.

It produces all posts as items array. Next we store this array of responses in our application as a state.

This response contains blog post titles featured images’ details and post content and other metadata such as tags, author name and published date.

We had few requirements to fulfill. First one is to show full content of the blogpost in a new blog page.

We can take the full content from response like this,

this.state.posts.slice(this.state.startPage, this.state.startPage + 10).map((posts, i) => {
        let content = posts.content;
})

We can use “cintent” variable to show content but it contains the featured image. We have to skip that image. For that,

let htmlContent = content.replace(/<img.*?>/, '');

Now we have to render this string value as HTML. For that we have to install “test-to-html” package using below command.

npm install html-to-text --save

Now we can convert text into html like this

htmlContent = renderHTML(htmlContent);

We used this HTML content inside the “CardText” tag.

<CardText> {htmlContent}
</CardText>

At the bottom of the post we needed to show author name, tags list and categories list.
Since tags and categories come in one array, we have to separate them.
First we defined an array which contains all the categories in Fossasia blog. Then we compared that array with the categories we got like this.

       const allCategories = ['FOSSASIA','GSoC','SUSI.AI']

Compare two arrays,

          posts.categories.map((cat) => {
                let k = 0;
                for (k = 0; k < allCategories.length; k++) {
                              if (cat === allCategories[k]) {
                                  category.push(cat);
                              }
              	}
          });

we defined this “arrDiff” simple function to get the difference of two arrays.

     var tags=arrDiff(category,posts.categories)

Make the list of categories

let fCategory=category.map((cat) =>
<span key={cat} ><a className="tagname" href={'https://blog.fossasia.org/category/' + cat.replace(/\s+/g, '-').toLowerCase()} rel="noopener noreferrer">{cat}</a></span>
   );

We can use above step to make tags list.

Then after used it in the “CardActions”

<span className='categoryContainer'>
    <i className="fa fa-folder-open-o tagIcon"></i>
    {fCategory}
</span>

 

According to the final requirement we needed to add social media share buttons for Facebook and Twitter.

If we need to make a twitter share button we have to follow up this method. But we can use “react-share” npm package to make these kind of share buttons.

This is how we made Facebook and Twitter share buttons. First of all we have to install “react-share” package using below command.

npm install react-share --save

Then we have to import the installed package.

import { ShareButtons, generateShareIcon } from 'react-share';

Then after we defined Button and Icon like this.

      const {FacebookShareButton,TwitterShareButton} = ShareButtons;
      const FacebookIcon = generateShareIcon('facebook');
      const TwitterIcon = generateShareIcon('twitter');

Now we can use these components.

<TwitterShareButton url={posts.guid} title={posts.title} via='asksusi' hashtags={posts.categories.slice(0, 4)} >                                                                                <TwitterIcon size={32} round={true} />
</TwitterShareButton>
<FacebookShareButton url={posts.link}>
     <FacebookIcon size={32} round={true} />
</FacebookShareButton>

We have to send URL and title of the post with the tweet and tags as hashtags. So we have to pass them into the component as above.
Above code produces this model of tweets.

That’s how “text-to-htm”l and “react-share” works on react. If you would like to contribute to SUSI project or any other FOSSASIA project please fork our repositories on github.

Resources:

Skill Editor in SUSI Skill CMS

SUSI Skill CMS is a web application built on ReactJS framework for creating and editing SUSI skills easily. It follows an API centric approach where the SUSI Server acts as an API server. In this blogpost we will see how to add a component which can be used to create a new skill SUSI Skill CMS.

For creating any skill in SUSI we need four parameters i.e model, group, language, skill name. So we need to ask these 4 parameters from the user. For input purposes we have a common card component which has dropdowns for selecting models, groups and languages, and a text field for skill name input.

<SelectField
    floatingLabelText="Model"
    value={this.state.modelValue}
    onChange={this.handleModelChange}
>
    {models}
</SelectField>
<SelectField
    floatingLabelText="Group"
    value={this.state.groupValue}
    onChange={this.handleGroupChange}
>
    {groups}
</SelectField>
<SelectField
    floatingLabelText="Language"
    value={this.state.languageValue}
    onChange={this.handleLanguageChange}
>
    {languages}
</SelectField>
<TextField
    floatingLabelText="Enter Skill name"
    floatingLabelFixed={true}
    hintText="My SUSI Skill"
    onChange={this.handleExpertChange}
/>
<RaisedButton label="Save" backgroundColor="#4285f4" labelColor="#fff" style={{marginLeft:10}} onTouchTap={this.saveClick} />

This is the card component where we get the user input. We have API endpoints on SUSI Server for getting the list of models, groups and languages. Using those APIs we inflate the dropdowns.
Then the user needs to edit the skill. For editing of skills we have used Ace Editor. Ace is an code
editor written in pure javascript. It matches the features native editors like Sublime and TextMate.

To use Ace we need to install the component.

npm install react-ace --save                        

This command will install the dependency and update the package.json file in our project with this dependency.

To use this editor we need to import AceEditor and place it in the render function of our react class.

<AceEditor
    mode=" markup"
    theme={this.state.editorTheme}
    width="100%"
    fontSize={this.state.fontSizeCode}
    height= "400px"
    value={this.state.code}
    name="skill_code_editor"
    onChange={this.onChange}
    editorProps={{$blockScrolling: true}}
/>

Now we have a page that looks something like this

Now we need to handle the click event when a user clicks on the save button.

First we check if the user is logged in or not. For this we check if we have the required cookies and the access token of the user.

 if(!cookies.get('loggedIn')) {
            notification.open({
                message: 'Not logged In',
                description: 'Please login and then try to create/edit a skill',
                icon: <Icon type="close-circle" style={{ color: '#f44336' }} />,
            });
            return 0;
        }

If the user is not logged in then we show him a error notification and asks him to login.

Then we check if he has filled all the required fields like name of the skill etc. and after that we call an API Endpoint on SUSI Server that will finally store the skill in the skill_data_repo.

let url= “http://api.susi.ai/cms/modifySkill.json”
$.ajax({
    url:url,
    dataType: 'jsonp',
    jsonp: 'callback',
    crossDomain: true,
    success: function (data) {
        console.log(data);
        if(data.accepted===true){
            notification.open({
                message: 'Accepted',
                description: 'Your Skill has been uploaded to the server',
                icon: <Icon type="check-circle" style={{ color: '#00C853' }} />,
            });
           }
    }
});

In the success function of ajax call we check if accepted parameter is true from the server or not. If accepted is true then we show user a notification with a message that “Your Skill has been uploaded to the server”.

To see this component running please visit http://skills.susi.ai/skillEditor.

Resources

Material-UI: http://www.material-ui.com/

Ace Editor: https://github.com/securingsincity/react-ace

Ajax: http://api.jquery.com/jquery.ajax/

Universal Cookies: https://www.npmjs.com/package/universal-cookie

Adding Map and RSS Action Type Support to SUSI MagicMirror Module with React

SUSI being an interactive personal assistant, answers questions in a variety of formats. This includes maps, RSS, table, and pie-chart. SUSI MagicMirror Module earlier provided support for only Answer Action Type. So, if you were to ask about a location, it could not show you a map for that location. Support for a variety of formats was added to SUSI Module for MagicMirror so that users can benefit from rich responses by SUSI.AI.

One problem that was faced while adding UI components is that in the MagicMirror Module structure, each module needs to supply its DOM by overriding the getDom() method. Therefore, you need to manage all the UI programmatically. Managing UI programmatically in Javascript is a cumbersome task since you need to create DOM nodes, manually apply styling to them, and add them to parent DOM object which is needed to be returned. We need to write UI for each element like below:

getDom: function () {
        .... 
        ....
        const moduleDiv = document.createElement("div");

        const visualizerCanvas = document.createElement("canvas");
        moduleDiv.appendChild(visualizerCanvas);

        const mapDiv = document.createElement("div");
        loadMap(mapDiv,lat, long);
        moduleDiv.appendChild(mapDiv);
        ...
        ...
}

As you can see, manually managing the DOM is neither that easy nor a recommended practice. It can be done in a more efficient way using the React Library by Facebook.  React is an open source UI library by Facebook. It works on the concept of Virtual DOM i.e. the whole DOM object gets created in the memory and only the changed components are reflected on the document.

Since the SUSI MagicMirror Module is primarily written in open-source TypeScript Lang (a typed superset of JavaScript), we also need to write React in TypeScript. To add React to a Typescript Project, we need to add some dependencies. They can be added using:

$ yarn add react react-dom @types/react @types/react

Now, we need to change our Webpack config to build .tsx files for React. TSX like JSX can contain HTML like syntax for representing DOM object in a syntactic sugar form. This can be done by changing resolve extensions and loaders config so that awesome typescript loaded compiles that TSX files. It is needed to be modified like below

resolve: {
   extensions: [".js", ".ts", ".tsx", ".jsx"],
},

module: {
   loaders: [{
       test: /\.tsx?$/,
       loaders: ["awesome-typescript-loader"],
   },
       {
           test: /\.json$/,
           loaders: ["json-loader"],
       }],
},

This will allow webpack to build and load both .tsx and .ts files. Now that project is setup properly, we need to add UI for Map and RSS Action Type.

The UI for Map is added with the help of React-Leaflet library. React-Leaflet module is a module build on top of Leaflet Map library for loading maps in Browser. We add the React-Leaflet library using

$ yarn add react-leaflet

Now, we declare a MapView Component in React and render Map in it using the React-Leaflet Library. Custom styling can be applied to it. The render function for MapView React Component is defined as follows.

import * as React from "react";
import {Map, Marker, Popup, TileLayer} from "react-leaflet";
interface IMapProps {
   latitude: number;
   longitude: number;
   zoom: number;
}

export class MapView extends React.Component<IMapProps, any> {

   public constructor(props: IMapProps) {
       super(props);
   }

   public render(): JSX.Element | any | any {
       const center = [this.props.latitude, this.props.longitude];
       console.log(center);
       return <Map center={center} zoom={this.props.zoom} style={{height: "300px"}}>
           <TileLayer url="http://{s}.tile.osm.org/{z}/{x}/{y}.png"/>
           <Marker position={center}>
               <Popup>
                   <span> Here </span>
               </Popup>
           </Marker>
       </Map>;
   }
}

For making the UI for RSS Action Type, we define an RSS Card Component. An RSS feed is constituted by various RSS Cards. An RSS Card is defined as follows.

import * as React from "react";

export interface IRssProps {
   title: string;
   description: string;
   link: string;
}

export class RSSCard extends React.Component <IRssProps, any> {

   constructor(props: IRssProps) {
       super(props);
   }

   public render(): JSX.Element | any | any {
       return <div className="card">
           <div className="card-title">{this.props.title}</div>
           <div className="card-description">{this.props.description}</div>
       </div>;
   }
}

Now, we define an RSS feed which is constituted by various RSS Information Cards. Since screen size is limited and there is no option available to the user to scroll, we limit the number of cards displayed to 5 with slice operation on data array.

import * as React from "react";
import {IRssProps, RSSCard} from "./rss-card";

export interface IRSSFeedProps {
   feeds: Array<IRssProps>;
}

export class RSSFeed extends React.Component <IRSSFeedProps, any> {

   public constructor(props: IRSSFeedProps) {
       super(props);
   }

   public render(): JSX.Element | any | any {
       return <div className="rss-div">
           {this.props.feeds.map((feed: IRssProps) => {
                   return <RSSCard key={feed.title} title={feed.title} description={feed.description} link={feed.link}/>;
               }
           ).slice(0, 5)}
       </div>;
   }
}

Now, we can add these components to UI easily and render it with ReactDOM like:

ReactDOM.render(<TableView data={tableData} columns={action.columns}/>, tableDiv);

Below is an example screenshot of RSS and Map View in SUSI MagicMirror.

Resources:

Use of Flux Architecture to Switch between Themes in SUSI Web Chat

While we were developing the SUSI Web Chat we got a requirement to build a dark theme. And to build a way that user can switch between dark and light theme.

SUSI Web Chat application is made according to the Flux architecture, So we had to build sub components according to that architecture.

What is flux:

Flux is not a framework. It is an Architecture/pattern that we can use to build applications using react and some other frameworks. Below figure shows the way how that architecture works and how it communicate.

How flux works:

Flux has four types of components. Those are views, actions, dispatcher and stores. We use JSX to build and integrate views into our JavaScript code.

When someone triggers an event from view, it triggers an action and that action sends particular action details  such as Actiontype, action name  and data to dispatcher. Dispatcher broadcasts those details to every store which are registered with the particular dispatcher. That means every store gets all the action details and data which are broadcasting from dispatchers which they are registered.

Let’s say we have triggered an action from view that is going to change the value of the store. Those action details are coming to dispatcher. Then dispatcher broadcasts those data to every store that registered with it. Matching action will trigger and update its value. If there is any change happened in store, view automatically updates corresponding view.

How themes are changing:

We have a store called “SettingStore.js”. This “SettingStore” contains theme values like current theme. We store other settings of the application such as: Mic input settings, Custom server details, Speech Output details, Default Language, etc.it is responsible to provide these details to corresponding view.

let CHANGE_EVENT = 'change';
class SettingStore extends EventEmitter {
   constructor() {
       super();
       this.theme = true; 
   }

We use “this.theme = true” in constructor to switch light theme as the default theme.

getTheme() { //provides current value of theme
       return this.theme;
   }

This method returns the value of the current theme when it triggers.

   changeTheme(themeChanges) {
       this.theme = !this.theme;
       this.emit(CHANGE_EVENT);
   }

We use “changeTheme” method to change the selected theme.

   handleActions(action) {
       switch (action.type) {
           case ActionTypes.THEME_CHANGED: {
               this.changeTheme(action.theme);
               break;
           }
           default: {
               // do nothing
           }
       }
   }
}

This switch case is the place that store gets actions distributed from the dispatcher and executes relevant method.

const settingStore = new SettingStore();
ChatAppDispatcher.register(settingStore.handleActions.bind(settingStore));
export default settingStore;

Here we registered our store(SettingStore) to “ChatAppDispatcher” .

This is how Store works.
Now we need to get the default light theme to the view. For that we have to call ”getTheme()” function. We can use the value it returns to update the state of the application.
Now we are going to change the theme. To do that we have to trigger “changeTheme” method of “Settingstrore” from view ( MessageSection.react.js ).
We trigger below method on click of the “Change Theme” button. It triggers the action called “themeChanged”.

 themeChanger(event) {
   Actions.themeChanged(!this.state.darkTheme);
 }

Previous method executes “themeChanged()” function of the actions.js file.

export function themeChanged(theme) {
 ChatAppDispatcher.dispatch({
   type: ActionTypes.THEME_CHANGED,
   theme //data came from parameter
 });
};

In above function we collect data from the view and send those data, method details to dispatcher.
Dispatcher sends those details to each and every registered store. In our case we have “SettingStore” and update the state to new dark theme.
This is how themes are changing in SUSI AI Web Chat application. Check this link to see the preview.

Resources:

  • Read About Flux: https://facebook.github.io/flux/
  • GitHub repository: https://github.com/fossasia/chat.susi.ai
  • Live Web Chat: http://chat.susi.ai/

Adding React based World Mood Tracker to loklak Apps

loklak apps is a website that hosts various apps that are built by using loklak API. It uses static pages and angular.js to make API calls and show results from users. As a part of my GSoC project, I had to introduce the World Mood Tracker app using loklak’s mood API. But since I had planned to work on React, I had to go off from the track of typical app development in loklak apps and integrate a React app in apps.loklak.org.

In this blog post, I will be discussing how I introduced a React based app to apps.loklak.org and solved the problem of country-wise visualisation of mood related data on a World map.

Setting up development environment inside apps.loklak.org

After following the steps to create a new app in apps.loklak.org, I needed to add proper tools and libraries for smooth development of the World Mood Tracker app. In this section, I’ll be explaining the basic configuration that made it possible for a React app to be functional in the angular environment.

Pre-requisites

The most obvious prerequisite for the project was Node.js. I used node v8.0.0 while development of the app. Instead of npm, I decided to go with yarn because of offline caching and Internet speed issues in India.

Webpack and Babel

To begin with, I initiated yarn in the app directory inside project and added basic dependencies –

$ yarn init
$ yarn add webpack webpack-dev-server path
$ yarn add babel-loader babel-core babel-preset-es2015 babel-preset-react --dev

 

Next, I configured webpack to set an entry point and output path for the node project in webpack.config.js

module.exports = {
    entry: './js/index.js',
    output: {
        path: path.resolve('.'),
        filename: 'index_bundle.js'
    },
    ...
};

This would signal to look for ./js/index.js as an entry point while bundling. Similarly, I configured babel for es2015 and React presets –

{
  "presets":[
    "es2015", "react"
  ]
}

 

After this, I was in a state to define loaders for module in webpack.config.js. The loaders would check for /\.js$/ and /\.jsx$/ and assign them to babel-loader (with an exclusion of node_modules).

React

After configuring the basic presets and loaders, I added React to dependencies of the project –

$ yarn add react react-dom

 

The React related files needed to be in ./js/ directory so that the webpack can bundle it. I used the file to create a simple React app –

import React from 'react';
import ReactDOM from 'react-dom';

ReactDOM.render(
    <div>World Mood Tracker</div>,
    document.getElementById('app')
);

 

After this, I was in a stage where it was possible to use this app as a part of apps.loklak.org app. But to do this, I first needed to compile these files and bundle them so that the external app can use it.

Configuring the build target for webpack

In apps.loklak.org, we need to have a file by the name of index.html in the app’s root directory. Here, we also needed to place the bundled js properly so it could be included in index.html at app’s root.

HTML Webpack Plugin

Using html-webpack-plugin, I enabled auto building of project in the app’s root directory by using the following configuration in webpack.config.js

...
const HtmlWebpackPlugin = require('html-webpack-plugin');
const HtmlWebpackPluginConfig = new HtmlWebpackPlugin({
    template: './js/index.html',
    filename: 'index.html',
    inject: 'body'
});
module.exports = {
    ...
    plugins: [HtmlWebpackPluginConfig]
};

 

This would build index.html at app’s root that would be discoverable externally.

To enable bundling of the project using simple yarn build command, the following lines were added to package.json

{
  ..
  "scripts": {
    ..
    "build": "webpack -p"
  }
}

After a simple yarn build command, we can see the bundled js and html being created at the app root.

Using datamaps for visualization

Datamaps is a JS library which allows plotting of data on map using D3 as backend. It provides a simple interface for creating visualizations and comes with a handy npm installation –

$ yarn add datamaps

Map declaration and usage as state

A map from datamaps was used a state for React component which allowed fast rendering of changes in the map as the state of React component changes –

export default class WorldMap extends React.Component {
    constructor() {
        super();
        this.state = {
            map: null
        };
    render() {
        return (<div className={styles.container}>
                <div id="map-container"></div></div>)
    }
    componentDidMount() {
        this.setState({map: new Datamap({...})});
    }
    ...
}

 

The declaration of map goes in componentDidMount method because it would not be possible to start the map until we have the div with id=”map-container” in the DOM. It was necessary to draw the map only after the component has mounted otherwise it would fail due to no id=”map-container” in the DOM.

Defining data for countries

Data for every country had two components –

data = {
    positiveScore: someValue,
    negativeScore: someValue
}

 

This data is used to generate popup for the counties –

this.setState({
    map: new Datamap({
        ...
        geographyConfig: {
            ...
            popupTemplate: function (geo, data) {
                // Configure variables pScore so that it gives “No Data” when data.positiveScore is not set (similar for negative)
                return [
                    // Use pScore and nScore to generate results here
                    // geo.properties.name would give current country name
                ].join('');
            }
        }
    })
});

The result for countries with unknown data values look something like this –

Conclusion

In this blog post, I explained about introducing a React based app in app.loklak.org’s angular based environment. I discussed the setup and bundling process of the project so it becomes available from the project’s external HTTP server.

I also discussed using datamaps as a visualisation tool for data about Tweets. The app was first introduced in pull request fossasia/apps.loklak.org#189 and was improved step by step in subsequent patches.

Resources

Test SUSI Web App with Facebook Jest

Jest is used by Facebook to test all Javascript codes specially React code snippets. If you need to setup jest on your react application you can follow up these simple steps. But if your React application is made with “create-react-app”, you do not need to setup jest manually. Because it comes with Jest. You can run test using “react-scripts” node module.

Since SUSI chat is made with “create-react-app” we do not need to install and run Jest directly. We executed our test cases using “npm test” it executes “react-scripts test” command. It executes all “.js” files under “__tests__” folders. And all other files with “.spec.js” and “.test.js” suffixes.

React apps that are made from “create-react-app” come with sample test case (smoke test) and that checks whether whole application is built correctly or not. If it passes the smoke test then it starts to run further test cases.

import React from 'react';
import ReactDOM from 'react-dom';
import ChatApp from '../../components/ChatApp.react';
it('renders without crashing', () => {
 const div = document.createElement('div');
 ReactDOM.render( < ChatApp / > , div);
});

This checks all components which are inside of the “<ChatApp />” component and it check whether all these components integrate correctly or not.

If we need to check only one component in isolated environment. We can use shallow rendering API. we have used shallow rendering API to check each and every component in isolated environment.

We have to install enzyme and test renderer before use it.

npm install --save-dev enzyme react-test-renderer

import React from 'react';
import MessageSection from '../../components/MessageSection.react';
import { shallow } from 'enzyme';
it('render MessageListItem without crashing',()=>{
  shallow(<MessageSection />);
})

This test case tests only the “MessageListItem”, not its child components.

After executing “npm test” you will get the passed and failed number of test cases.

If you need to see the coverage you can see it without installing additional dependencies.

You just need to run this.

npm test -- --coverage

It will show the output like this.

This view shows how many lines, functions, statements, branches your program has and this shows how much of those covered from the test cases you have.

If we are going to write new test cases for susi chat, we have to make separate file in “__tests__” folder and name it with corresponding file name that we are going to test.

it('your test case description',()=>{
 //test what you need 
})

Normally test cases looks like this.in test cases you can use “test” instead of “it” .after test case description, there is a fat arrow function. In side this fat arrow function you can add what you need to test

In below example I have compared returned value of the function with static value.

function funcName(){
 return 1;
}

it('your test case description',()=>{
 expect(funcName()).toBe(1);
})

You have to add your function/variable that need to be tested into “expect()” and value you expect from that function or variable into “toBe()”.  Instead of “toBe()” you can use different functions according to your need.

If you have a long list of test cases you can group them ( using describe()).

describe('my beverage', () => {
  test('is delicious', () => {
    expect(myBeverage.delicious).toBeTruthy();
  });

  test('is not sour', () => {
    expect(myBeverage.sour).toBeFalsy();
  });
});

This post covers only few things of testing . You can learn more about jest testing from official documentation here.