Making Zoom View in PSLab Android app

This blog demonstrates how to make a zoom view in an Android app by taking example from one made in PSLab Android app. It will mainly reflect the work done under PR #1117 in PSLab Android repository. The demonstration shown in this blog is for zooming a complete layout. But individual components of a layout can also be given this zoom effect.

How to make a zoom view?

Below is a step by step guide on how to implement a zoom view in an Android app :

  • First make a  Zoom Layout class in Android Project which will further include GestureDetector, MotionEvent, etc.
  • Now extend the Zoom Layout class from a base layout provided by Android i.e. Relative Layout, Linear Layout, etc. as per need because we need to give zoom effect to a complete layout. In this demonstration, I will use the Relative Layout class as my base class.
  • Also to detect the gestures made by a user, we need to implement the ScaleGestureDetector.OnScaleGestureListener class. So, finally, the class implementation will look like this
public class ZoomLayout extends RelativeLayout implements ScaleGestureDetector.OnScaleGestureListener {
}
  • Now make default constructors and declare variables to define the range of the minimum and maximum possible zoom, coordinates before drag, coordinates after drag, etc.
private static final float MIN_ZOOM = 1.0f;
private static final float MAX_ZOOM = 4.0f;
private Mode mode = Mode.NONE;
private float scale = 1.0f;
private float lastScaleFactor = 0f;
private float startX = 0f;
private float startY = 0f;
private float dx = 0f;
private float dy = 0f;
private float prevDx = 0f;
private float prevDy = 0f;

public ZoomLayout(Context context) {
   super(context);
   init(context);
}

Here startX and startY are the initial coordinates of the layout, dx and dy are the new coordinates of the layout and prevDx and prevDy are the coordinates of the previous location of the layout. Also, mode is the current mode of the gesture which will be further elaborated upon in coming steps, and all other remaining variables are for scaling the screen on gesture movements. Also, init(context) is a method which will be explained in step 5.

  • Now, we will make a method named init() to initiate the process of scaling the layout on gesture detection.
public void init(Context context) {
        final ScaleGestureDetector scaleDetector = new ScaleGestureDetector(context, this);
        this.setOnTouchListener(new OnTouchListener() {
            @Override
            public boolean onTouch(View view, MotionEvent motionEvent) {
                switch (motionEvent.getAction() & MotionEvent.ACTION_MASK) {
                    case MotionEvent.ACTION_DOWN:
                        if (scale > MIN_ZOOM) {
                            mode = Mode.DRAG;
                            startX = motionEvent.getX() - prevDx;
                            startY = motionEvent.getY() - prevDy;
                        }
                        break;
                    case MotionEvent.ACTION_MOVE:
                        if (mode == Mode.DRAG) {
                            dx = motionEvent.getX() - startX;
                            dy = motionEvent.getY() - startY;
                        }
                        break;
                    case MotionEvent.ACTION_POINTER_DOWN:
                        mode = Mode.ZOOM;
                        break;
                    case MotionEvent.ACTION_POINTER_UP:
                        mode = Mode.DRAG;
                        break;
                    case MotionEvent.ACTION_UP:
                        mode = Mode.NONE;
                        prevDx = dx;
                        prevDy = dy;
                        break;
                    default:
                        mode = Mode.NONE;
                        prevDx = dx;
                        prevDy = dy;
                        break;
                }
                scaleDetector.onTouchEvent(motionEvent);

                if ((mode == Mode.DRAG && scale >= MIN_ZOOM) || mode == Mode.ZOOM) {
                    getParent().requestDisallowInterceptTouchEvent(true);
                    float maxDx = (child().getWidth() - (child().getWidth() / scale)) / 2 * scale;
                    float maxDy = (child().getHeight() - (child().getHeight() / scale)) * scale;
                    dx = Math.min(Math.max(dx, -maxDx), maxDx);
                    dy = Math.min(Math.max(dy, -maxDy), maxDy);
                    applyScaleAndTranslation();
                }
                return true;
            }
        });
    }

The detailed explanation of the above code snippet is as follows:

  1. scaleDetector – A gesture detector variable to store the scaling of the screen i.e. how much the screen is zoomed
  2. onTouch() – It is the main method handling the calculations for zooming the layout and setting the position of the zoomed layout. The view attribute is the current view of the layout and the motionEvent attribute handles the different task for different gestures made by a user.

Here the mode variable is used to define one of the three gestures i.e. NONE, DRAG or ZOOM where

  1. NONE – No gesture detected on the screen
  2. DRAG – Sliding gestures are made
  3. ZOOM – Pinch gesture is made

Also, a detailed explanation of the motion events used in the switch case can be found out in the resources [1].

After the switch case, the if statement is used to do calculations based on the current child in focus and the previous coordinates if and only if the zoom hasn’t reached the maximum limit and the view is dragged to see the zoomed contents. Method getParent().requestDisallowInterceptTouchEvent(true) is used to disable the scroll effect of the parent layout if any. In this case, the zoomed layout is inside a bottom sheet and so by using this method, the bottom sheet isn’t closed on swipe down gesture.

  • Now create applyScaleAndTransition() method and child() method used in step 5.
private View child() {
        return getChildAt(0);
    }

This method is used to return the current child layout in focus i.e. visible on the screen.

private void applyScaleAndTranslation() {
        child().setScaleX(scale);
        child().setScaleY(scale);
        child().setTranslationX(dx);
        child().setTranslationY(dy);
    }

This method is used to apply the final calculations that are done in step 5 to the child layout in focus.

So, now the Zoom Layout is ready for use and can be used as same as we use the Relative Layout in the XML files. The final output produced by using the Zoom Layout as a child of bottom sheet in PSLab Android app is as shown in figure 1.

Figure 1. Demonstration of Zoom Layout made in PSLab Android app

Resources

  1. https://developer.android.com/reference/android/view/MotionEvent – Documentation of motion event gestures in android

Working with Logic Analyzer in PSLab Android app

This blog demonstrates the working of Logic Analyzer instrument available in PSLab Android app. It also includes a detailed description of the features available in the Logic Analyzer instrument along with a step by step guide on how to work with it which will be beneficial to first-time users of the PSLab application.

The functionality of the Logic Analyzer available in PSLab Android app is same as that in PSLab Desktop App. So, it would be easy for a user of PSLab Desktop Application to get acquainted with this Logic Analyzer. The only difference in this instrument is the changed and attractive UI which makes working with it very easy.

Why use Logic Analyzer?

The Logic Analyzer instrument provides the functionality of capturing and plotting the digital waves on the screen so that it would be easy for a user to determine the time relationship between different waves. So, this instrument would be very useful while working with timing diagrams, protocol decodes, state machines traces, assembly language, or with source-level software.

How to generate different digital pulses in the PSLab app?

Logic Analyzer needs to be provided with some input of digital pulses among whom time relationship is to be found out. Digital pulses generated from different systems can be directly provided as input to the Logic Analyzer for analyzing. But PSLab provides a functionality to generate digital pulses up to some constrained frequency.

Following are the steps to generate different digital waves in PSLab Android application :

  • Open PSLab Android application and click on the Wave Generator tile as shown in figure 1. After opening the instrument, the screen will look as shown in figure 2.

Figure 1. Wave Generator instrument tile available in PSLab Android app

Figure 2. The main screen of the Wave Generator instrument

  • Click on the MODE button to change the mode to PWM. The screen will look as shown in figure 3.

Figure 3. PWM mode in Wave Generator

  • PSLab device provides generation of maximum four digital waves at once. In this example, I will proceed by utilizing only two pins i.e. SQR1and SQR2 (where SQR = Acronym of square wave generator and the number next to it is the pin ID available on the PSLab device) to demonstrate the working of Two Channel Mode in Logic Analyzer. Set the duty cycles and frequency for the selected pins as desired (try to keep all the duty cycles different from each other to understand the process of measurement easily).

NOTE: User can also set phase angle for different waves but I will proceed with defaults.

How to analyze the generated waves in Logic Analyzer?

  • Now go back and select the Logic Analyzer tile as shown in figure 4 from the list of available instruments. A screen as shown in figure 5 should open.

Figure 4. Tile of Logic Analyzer instrument available in the PSLab app

Figure 5. The main screen of the Logic Analyzer instrument

On the right-hand side, you can see a slider whose initial value is SELECT which shows the information on how to use the slider below it. Below the Channel Selection area is the Analyze button used to fetch and plot the data which is generated or provided to the respective Logic Analyzer pins i.e. ID1, ID2, ID3, and ID4.

The blank area on the left is where the graph will be plotted after fetching data points. Below it is the Axis Indicator used to indicate the position of the highlighter so that time measurement can be done easily. To the right of the Axis Indicator is a small light which indicates the status of the device. It turns GREEN if the device is connected else it remains in RED.

  • In this blog, I will demonstrate the Two Channel Mode. But all the other available modes need the same implementation by only varying the number of pins in use. So, slide to 2 in the Carousel View and a screen as shown in figure 6 will pop up.

Figure 6. Two Channel Mode in Logic Analyzer

  • Connect the wires on the PSLab device as shown in Figure 7.

Figure 7. Connecting wires on PSLab

NOTE: The Logic Analyzer pins used in this demonstration are ID1 and ID2. But any IDx pin can be chosen for analysis. But try to maintain the selected choice throughout the implementation.

  • Now from the Channel Selection area, select the channel for the first card to  ID1 (default) and that for the second card to ID2. For Edges Selection, maintain the defaults.

NOTE: There are several options available for plotting the digital waves besides the default selected i.e.

  1. Every Edge – Plot every edge of the signal
  2. Falling Edges – Plot only falling edges of the signal (When a signal comes from 1 to 0 state)
  3. Rising Edges Only – Plot only rising edges of the signal (When a signal comes from 0 to 1 state)
  4. Disabled – Don’t plot the selected wave
  • After Channel Selection, press the Analyze button to plot the data. On pressing the Analyze button, a circular loading sign will appear showing that the data is being fetched and converted to data that can be plotted. As soon as the data is ready to be plotted, the loading sign vanishes and the graph appears as shown in figure 8.

Figure 8. GIF showing the loading and analyzing processes

  • The time relationship between the plotted data can be found out by clicking over the rising/falling edges and noting the time shown in the Axis Indicator as shown in figure 8.
  • An example of Edge Selection is shown in figure 9.

Figure 9. Example of Edge Selection option

Here, EVERY FALLING EDGE option is selected for the ID1 channel and EVERY RISING EDGE option is selected for the ID2 channel.

So in this way, the Logic Analyzer instrument available in PSLab Android application can be used to ease out the process of calculating the time interval between different edges for different/same digital pulse/s.

Resources

  1. PSLab Android Application – https://github.com/fossasia/pslab-android (Link to repo)
  2. PSLab device pins sticker – https://github.com/fossasia/pslab-artwork/blob/master/Sticker/pslabdesign.png

Implementing Carousel Slider in PSLab Android App

This blog is a demonstration for creating a Carousel Picker in Android by taking an example of the Carousel Picker made in PSLab Android app under PR #1007. Some improvement to this would be to add custom animation to the ViewPager and adjusting the ViewPager sliding speed. So first let’s start with the basics and terminology of Carousel.

What is Carousel?

Carousel according to the dictionary means roundabout or merry-go-round. The term was mainly used for the traditional amusement ride of a merry-go-round in amusement parks with seats of horses. The same is the working of Carousel View in Android. It gives a smooth sliding effect to slide between a variety of options available.

How to implement Carousel View in the app?

Following are the steps to implement a basic Carousel View in the app. Further effects and upgrades can be given as per the need.

  • The first step is to add jitpack to your app’s gradle file
maven { url 'https://jitpack.io '}
  • Now add a library dependency in your project level gradle file
compile 'com.github.Vatican-Cameos:CarouselPicker:v1.0

The above dependency uses the View Pager and Gesture Detector functionality provided by Android. The Gesture Detector class detects the swipe gesture made by the user and the View Pager highlights the relevant label in the Carousel box according to the swipe done i.e left or right.

  • Now Carousel Picker is ready to be added directly to layouts. So, add the Carousel by adding the following layout code at a proper section in layouts file.
<in.goodiebag.carouselpicker.CarouselPicker
	android:id="@+id/carouselPicker"
	android:layout_width="match_parent"
	android:layout_height="wrap_content"
	android:layout_marginTop="20dp"
	android:layout_marginBottom="20dp"
	android:background="#DDD"
	apps:items_visible="three" />

Here, the items_visible is used to provide the Carousel Picker with the number of max items to be seen at a time on screen where only one item will be in focus. Other items are adjusted on the side and can be viewed by scrolling.

  • Now as we have implemented the layouts, so now’s the time to set adapter and resource type for Carousel to hold in Java files. First, find the Carousel View with its id.
CarouselPicker carouselPicker = findViewById(R.id.carouselPicker);
  • Now set a list of items to be added in the Carousel Picker. The items can be both images and texts.
List<CarouselPicker.PickerItem> items = new ArrayList<>();

To add images :

items.add(new CarouselPicker.DrawableItem(R.mipmap.ic_launcher));

To add texts/strings :

items.add(new CarouselPicker.TextItem("Example", 10));

Here, the integer that is added after the text indicates the size in sp of the text that is to be displayed in Carousel View.

  • Now after creating a list of items, make an adapter which provides this list of information to Carousel Picker.
CarouselPicker.CarouselViewAdpater adapter = new CarouselPicker.CarouselViewAdpater(this, items);
  • Now set the adapter for the Carousel View :
carouselPicker.setAdapter(adapter);
  • To dynamically add items to the Carousel View, simply change the list of items in the list provided to the adapter and then use
adapter.notifyDataSetChanged();
  • Now to change the functionality of the app with every Carousel item, implement the onPageChangeListener as Carousel View implements ViewPager class.
carouselPicker.setOnPageChangeListener(new ViewPager.OnPageChangeListener() {
        	@Override
        	public void onPageScrolled(int position, float positionOffset, int positionOffsetPixels) {
        	}

        	@Override
        	public void onPageSelected(int position) {
        	}

        	@Override
        	public void onPageScrollStateChanged(int state) {
          }

Following GIF shows how Carousel View looked after implementation in PSLab app. Each option provided in the view was used to provide user with a different channel selection mode.

Figure 1. GIF of implemented Carousel View in PSLab app

So in this way, a Carousel Picker or Carousel View can be implemented in the app. Further functionalities of animations, mirroring, shadow effect, all can be done with just minor changes in the above code. And to fully customize the look of the Carousel or to enable infinite scrolling feature, a local Carousel Picker can be implemented by just making a custom adapter and a class that extends ViewPager class. Below are the resources to implement both custom and dependency based Carousel View.

Resources

  1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sTJm1Ys9jMI – Youtube Video for dependency based Carousel View
  2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ct0oPf_u2o – Youtube Video for implementing infinite scrolling
  3. http://www.codexpedia.com/android/android-carousel-view-using-viewpager/ – An article to implement custom Carousel View

 

 

 

 

 

Working with Logic Analyzer in PSLab application

This blog demonstrates the working of Logic Analyzer instrument available in PSLab Desktop Application. It also includes a detailed description of the features available in the Logic Analyzer instrument. Also, it provides a step by step guide on how to work with the Logic Analyzer provided by PSLab which will be beneficial to first-time users.

What is a Logic Analyzer?

A Logic Analyzer is an electronic instrument used to capture and display digital signals with an added functionality of providing the time difference between different edges of different pulses. It is mainly used to observe the time relationship between different digital signals. An example of a standard Logic Analyzer available in the market is as shown in figure 1.

Figure 1. Standard Logic Analyzer

How to generate different digital pulses in PSLab?

Logic Analyzer needs to be provided with some input of digital pulses among whom time relationship is to be found out. Digital pulses generated from different systems can be directly provided as input to the logic analyzer for analyzing. But PSLab provides a functionality to generate digital pulses up to some constrained frequency.

Following are the steps to generate different digital waves in the PSLab desktop application :

  • Go to Advanced Control Section of PSLab app. The screen should look like one as shown in Figure 2.

Figure 2.  Advanced Control Section

  • PSLab device provides generation of maximum four digital waves at once. In this example, I will proceed by utilizing all the four pins i.e. SQR1, SQR2, SQR3, SQR4 (where SQR = Acronym of square wave generator and the number next to it is the pin ID available on the PSLab device). Set the duty cycles for each of the pins as desired (try to keep all the duty cycles different from each other to understand the process of measurement easily). After setting it should look something like Figure 3.

Figure 3. Configuring PWM

NOTE: User can also set phase angle for different waves but I will proceed keeping all without any phase difference.

  • Now set the frequency of the digital waves in the tab provided next to text Frequency and then press the SET button. This should generate desired digital waves when connected.

How to analyze the generated waves in Logic Analyzer?

  • Now go to the Experiments section and click on the Logic Analyzer instrument as shown in Figure 4.

Figure 4. Test and Measurement Page

  • Now a screen as shown in Figure 5 should open which is the main screen for Logic Analyzer Instrument.

Figure 5. Logic Analyzer Main Page

On the right, you can see three buttons i.e Start, Plot Data and Raw Data. Below that selection for the number of channels is provided. And at last, the time measurement tool is provided which can measure the time difference between different edges of different digital waves. The graph at the center is the place where all the waves generated will be plotted.

  • Now as we have generated four different waves, we need to navigate to Four Channel Mode in the Channel Selection section. There you can observe four pins i.e. ID1, ID2, ID3, and ID4 are selected by default as shown in Figure 6. So, we need to connect the pins SQR1, SQR2, SQR3 and SQR4 with pins ID1, ID2, ID3 and ID4 on the PSLab device.

Figure 6. Channel Selection Section

NOTE: There are several options available for plotting the digital waves besides the one selected in the above image i.e.

  1. Every Edge – Plot every edge of the signal
  2. Falling Edges – Plot only falling edges of the signal (When a signal comes from 1 to 0 state)
  3. Rising Edges Only – Plot only rising edges of the signal (When a signal comes from 0 to 1 state)
  4. Disabled – Don’t plot the selected wave

Figure 7. Connecting wires on PSLab device

  • Connect the wires on the PSLab device as shown in Figure 7.
  • Now, as the device is connected, we can use the three buttons located at the top right corner to plot the digital waves. The functionalities of all the three buttons are as follows:
  1. Start – It collects exactly 2500 sample points from the wave generated to be plotted
  2. Plot Data – It plots the data on the graph if the samples are collected successfully
  3. Raw Data – It provides a sheet containing time at particular intervals and the difference between the data points at that particular time
  • Press the Start button and as soon as the samples are collected, press the Plot Data button. Then the screen should look something like Figure 8.

Figure 8. Final graph of input provided

Zoom in further, and the screen will look like Figure 9.

Figure 9. Zoomed In graph for better visualization

  • So now, the waves are plotted and are ready to be analyzed. Time difference between any two edges for any two distinct or a similar wave can be found out by using the TIME INTERVAL MEASUREMENT TOOL which is as shown in Figure 10.

Figure 10. Time Interval Measurement Tool

  • The working of this tool can be explained by taking an example as follow :

Figure 11. Configuring the Time Interval Measurement Tool

Suppose time difference between the rising edge of ID1 and falling edge of ID3 is to be measured. So, set the parameters as shown in Figure 11 for the following situation.

The timeout of the Logic Analyzer can be set to any desired value from 10mS to 9999 mS. Here, I will proceed with 10mS of the timeout. Now, press the measure button to see the result. It will be same as the Figure 12 shown below if all the configurations are set as the one in the  example :

Figure 12. Calculated time difference displayed

So in this way, many calculations can be taken out very easily and can be viewed at once at a single place without manually doing any calculations. Also, the data generated can be stored in the local system by pressing the Save Data button located at the bottom right corner.

Resources

  1. PSLab Desktop Application – https://github.com/fossasia/pslab-desktop-apps (Link to repo)
  2. PSLab device pins sticker – https://github.com/fossasia/pslab-artwork/blob/master/Sticker/pslabdesign.png

 

Implementing Card View in PSLab app

Card View was announced by Google in I/O ‘14 conference. Although it started a bit slow, but now we can see most of the apps like Snapchat, Google, Facebook, etc. using this widget. So, this blog is solely contributed on how to implement Card View in your own app by taking example of PSLab application.

What is Card View ?

CardView is a view container or ViewGroup that inherits its nature from FrameLayout which further inherits from ViewGroup itself. The only thing that separates a CardView from any other ViewGroups is its nature to behave like a card, more specifically the shadow and rounded corners. The basic customization that a CardView provides includes CornerRadius, Elevation, MaxElevation, ContentPadding, CompatPadding, PreventCornerOverlap, and a dedicated CardBackgroundColor or say Card Background which is the most necessary feature for a card to look cool.

Step by Step description how CardView was implemented in PSLab

  • First step is to add dependencies in your project as widgets like Card View, Recyclerview, etc. are not included in a common repository of widgets provided by Google.

App level dependency :

compile 'com.android.support:cardview-v7:26.0.0'
compile 'com.android.support:recyclerview-v7:+'

If you are using Android Studio 3.0+ than add the following dependency instead of above :

implementation 'com.android.support:cardview-v7:26.0.0'
implementation 'com.android.support:recyclerview-v7:27.1.1'
  •  Now we can use Card View widget in our app. So, first make add card view in layout section like this :
<android.support.v7.widget.CardView
    	android:id="@+id/card_view"
    	android:layout_width="match_parent"
    	android:layout_height="@dimen/total_height_card"
    	android:layout_gravity="center"
    	android:layout_margin="@dimen/card_margin"
    	card_view:cardCornerRadius="@dimen/card_radius">
 </android.support.v7.widget.CardView>

These are the basic attributes that are used while declaring a card view. Other possible attributes can be :

  1. Elevation – Used to elevate card to give a depth effect
  2. MaxElevation – Used to give constraint to the depth effect
  3. ContentPadding – Used to provide padding between content and the card
  4. PreventCornerOverlap – To prevent different corners to overlap as shown in figure 1.

Figure 1. Image showing corner overlapping in CardView

  • Now to set the objects inside the Card View, mostly RelativeLayout is preferred as it gives the freedom to place objects in reference of others whereas LinearLayout provides freedom to place them in only one direction. Other layouts such as FrameLayout, Tables, etc. can be used as per the need of the app.
  • Now we will create a layout that will hold all the cards using RecyclerView.
<android.support.v7.widget.RecyclerView
        android:id="@+id/recycler_view"
        android:scrollbars="vertical"
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"/>
  • Now after setting the layouts, it’s time to make adapter which inflates the information in the cards which is then represented using RecyclerView.
public class ApplicationAdapter extends RecyclerView.Adapter<ApplicationAdapter.Holder> {

	private List<ApplicationItem> applicationList;
	private final OnItemClickListener listener;
	/**
 	* View holder for application list item
 	*/
	public class Holder extends RecyclerView.ViewHolder {

    	TextView header, description;
    	ImageView applicationIcon; //Background Image

    	public Holder(View itemView) {
        super(itemView);
        this.header = itemView.findViewById(R.id.heading_card);
        this.description = itemView.findViewById(R.id.description_card);
        this.applicationIcon = itemView.findViewById(R.id.application_icon);
    	}

    	public void setup(final ApplicationItem applicationItem, final OnItemClickListener listener) {
      header.setText(applicationItem.getApplicationName());
      description.setText(applicationItem.getApplicationDescription());
      applicationIcon.setImageResource(applicationItem.getApplicationIcon());
         }
	}

	public ApplicationAdapter(Context mContext, List<ApplicationItem> applicationList, OnItemClickListener listener) {
    	this.mContext = mContext;
    	this.applicationList = applicationList;
    	this.listener = listener;
	}

     @Override
	public Holder onCreateViewHolder(ViewGroup parent, int viewType) {
    	View itemView = LayoutInflater.from(parent.getContext())
            	.inflate(R.layout.application_list_item, parent, false);
    	return new Holder(itemView);
	}

Following is the detailed explanation of each and every method :

  1. Holder(View ) – As name suggests, it holds all the items that are included in a single card together
  2. setup() – This method can contain any number of parameters as per requirement. It basically sets the data in the views in the card
  3. ApplicationAdapter() – Constructor
  4. onCreateViewHolder() – It inflates the layout containing CardView as soon as the data gets ready to be fed in it
  • Now as adapter is ready, we can declare RecyclerView in Java code to implement CardView. The main reason to use RecyclerView is that it provides the feature of scrollability so that a number of cards can be adjusted on the screen. ScrollView can also be used but it slows down the app as it tries to load all the card at once rather than loading cards as per use like RecyclerView.
RecyclerView listView = view.findViewById(R.id.applications_recycler_view);
    	RecyclerView.LayoutManager mLayoutManager = new GridLayoutManager(context, rows);
    	listView.setLayoutManager(mLayoutManager);
    	listView.setItemAnimator(new DefaultItemAnimator());
    	listView.setAdapter(applicationAdapter);

Here, we have used GridLayoutManager to use grids along with RecyclerView. It is optional and can be used as per requirement. Also, before setting adapter, fill the adapter with relevant data or else no card will be seen in actual app.

  • Now the app is ready to be built and tested on mobile device. This is how it looks in the PSLab application after implementing the above guide :

Figure 2. Screenshot of CardView implemented in PSLab app

So, in this way great user experience can be given by using this very basic widget. But great attention should be given while designing the objects inside the card as the selection and position of the objects is what makes the card look good. Objects used in making cards for PSLab very well suited the app and so are designed like that. Practice should be done by taking reference of some very good apps like Snapchat, Google, etc. and from Material Designs provided by Google before implementing them in actual project.

Resources

  1. https://www.androidhive.info/2016/05/android-working-with-card-view-and-recycler-view/ – This article gives a better practice by implementing a real world example
  2. https://developer.android.com/reference/android/support/v7/widget/CardView – Official documentation by Google on CardView
  3. https://developer.android.com/guide/topics/ui/layout/recyclerview – Official documentation by Google on RecyclerView

Implementing Leak Canary in PSLab Android App

This post discusses the issue of memory leaks and how to handle them efficiently and what are the tools available which help developers in managing the memory leaks. After working on PR #824 opened under PSLab – Android repository I have got a greater idea about how to manage the memory efficiently and what are the tools that should be used to ease the work.

What are memory leaks and how it affects the quality of app?

In simple words, memory leaks happen when you hold on to an item for long after its purpose have been served. It is as simple as that. But let us dive in further to understand more about this topic. Programming languages like C and C++ need memory management done by user whereas in higher level languages like Java, Python, etc. low-level memory management and garbage collection is done automatically by the system. But it is due to programming faults that memory leaks happen and so care needs to be taken with higher level languages too in handling memory efficiently.

In Android or say in any OS (operating system), every item has to be destroyed or say deleted or freed from the memory after its purpose is served. But if the reference of this object is passed on to any other object which has a greater time of importance than this, then it will try to hold this object for long and so the garbage collector won’t be able to collect it and so there will be memory leaks in the code. This is how memory leaks occurs inside an app.

Now, the issue of memory leaks is utmost important among developers as due to it, the app becomes slow, laggy, eats up a lot of memory and the app crashes after some time of use which creates a very bad user experience. As the user keeps on using the app, the heap memory also keeps on increasing and due to memory leaks, this heap can’t be freed by the garbage collector. Thus, all these issues contribute to making the threads or processes running inside the app slower and it can result in a lag of time from microseconds to milliseconds too!!

How can you detect these memory leaks?

This blog is mostly for Android developers and so I will use the environment of Android Studio for reference. For controlling memory leaks, Android Studio has a very powerful tool named Monitors. There are individual monitors not only for memory usage but for CPU, GPU, and network usage as well. An example of it is shown in figure 1 below.

Figure 1. Monitor in Android Studio

Now how to observe the graphs that are produced by Monitors to see if there are any memory leaks? The first alarming case is when the memory usage graph constantly increases and doesn’t come down as time passes and even not decreases when you put the app in the background. The tools which are used to undo memory leaks as soon as they are found are:

  1. Allocation Tracker: The allocation tracker comes with an indicator to show the percentage of memory allocated to different types of objects in your app. The developer can have a clear idea about which object is taking what amount of memory and which objects are exceeding the memory limit. But it is itself not enough as the developer needs other tools to dump the extra memory.
  2. Leak Canary Library: It is the most used library by developers to check for memory leaks in an app. This library runs along with app and dumps memory when needed, looks for potential memory leaks  and gives a notification for a memory leak with a clean trace to find the root of the leak with sub-roots attached to it as shown in figure 2 :

Figure 2. Screenshot from Leaks application made by Leak Canary for PSLab app

It is clearly visible from the image that the applications show the root of the memory leak with an indication of how much memory is leaked in the toolbar.

Explanation of leak shown in figure 2 :

In the PSLab app, there is a navigation drawer consisting of all main functionalities in it. It is as shown in figure 3 :

Figure 3. Navigation drawer in PSLab

The memory leak as shown in figure 2 originated in the following steps :

  • It started with ArrayList which is here the list of items as shown in figure 3.
  • After it comes to the ScrollContainer which helps in scrolling this list on small screens.
  • Then comes the Drawer Layout which is the actual layout seen in figure 3 that slides over the main layout which is here the Instruments layout.
  • At last, comes the InputMethodManager which is introduced by Leak Canary library which watches the activity that is being opened.
  • Here, InputMethodManager kept watching on Drawer Layout but after closing the layout too it referenced it which is due to the source code of LeakCanary Library and so memory Leak occurred.

How to stop this leak from occurring ?

A simple way is to add a transparent activity as soon as the layout is closed for a very small time i.e. 500 ms so that the reference watcher gets shifted from the actual layout. This solution is based on the article published on Medium [5].

How to implement Leak Canary in your app?

Below is the step-by-step guide on implementing Leak Canary library in your app to implement a watcher for memory leaks :

    • Add dependencies (App Level) in your project to implement Leak Canary
debugImplementation 'com.squareup.leakcanary:leakcanary-android:1.5.4'
releaseImplementation 'com.squareup.leakcanary:leakcanary-android-no-op:1.5.4'
testImplementation 'com.squareup.leakcanary:leakcanary-android-no-op:1.5.4'
      1. debugImplementation – For debug flavor of app
      2. releaseImplementation – For release flavor of app
      3. testImplementation – For testing the current flavor of the app

Add dependencies according to the need for the application.

Add Realm dependencies (Project Level) in your app to create a database which can be used by Leak Canary to maintain and provide crash reports as shown in the figure above.

NOTE: Any database can be used here according to the need of the app

buildscript {
            repositories {
                     jcenter()
                         }
            dependencies {
                classpath "io.realm:realm-gradle-plugin:0.88.2"
           }
       }
 apply plugin: 'realm-android'

App-level dependency :

compile 'io.realm:android-adapters:2.0.0'
  • Add an activity class in your application to construct the Leak Canary for your entire application. In PSLab Android application, it was made as under :
package org.fossasia.pslab;

import android.app.Application;

import com.squareup.leakcanary.LeakCanary;
import com.squareup.leakcanary.RefWatcher;

import io.realm.Realm;

public class PSLabApplication extends Application {

	public RefWatcher refWatcher;

	@Override
	public void onCreate() {
    	super.onCreate();
    	Realm.init(this);

    	initializeLeakCanary();
	}

	private void initializeLeakCanary() {
    	if (LeakCanary.isInAnalyzerProcess(this)) {
        	return;
    	}
    	refWatcher = LeakCanary.install(this);
	}
}

Explanation of the above-implemented code :

  1. First import all the necessary libraries
  2. Realm.init(this) is used to initiate the database as soon as the layout of the Leak Canary is ready to work so that before any crashes, the database is ready to accept the entry
  3. initializeLeakCanary() method first checks if the analyzer is in the process i.e. if the Leak Canary is already initiated so that there’s no need to again initiate it else a reference watcher is initiated with variable refWatcher which looks out for any potential memory leaks

After this, you can provide a watcher with an object to watch by writing :

refWatcher.watch(object);

Now your app is ready to handle any case of memory leaks and thus the developer can find the root of the issue if any and can solve it with ease. The app will now work 94% more efficiently than what it used to be with memory leaks. Thus, a greater user experience can be provided now but in the backend!!

Resources

  1. How to use Leak Canary – Article on Stack Overflow
  2. Everything you need to know about memory leaks – Article on medium.com
  3. Leak Canary: Detect all memory leaks -Another great article on medium.com
  4. https://github.com/square/leakcanary – Actual GitHub repo of Leak Canary library
  5. https://medium.com/@amitshekhar/android-memory-leaks-inputmethodmanager-solved-a6f2fe1d1348 – Medium article on how to solve InputMethodManager related leaks

 

Implementing search bar in PSLab app

PSLab offers a large range of functions with a large field of applications. This results in the long access path to certain information and functionality in the app, which affects the user experience (UX) negatively. In this blog post, I will show how the UX in Android applications with many functions can be improved by implementing a ‘Search Bar’. Further, I have created a screencast that follows the step-by-step description shown in this blog post [1].

Search Bar is the functionality which can be seen nowadays in almost all the apps. It is a handy widget for users to navigate the app. PSLab’s Android app was lacking this functionality and so I added it using an external library from Mirrajabi called ‘search-dialog’ [3]. I decided to use this library as it provides a search bar with built-in functionality of highlighting the text that’s selected or written down in the ‘Edit Text’ field by the user and also it overlays on the screen which provides a good user experience rather than other search bars which overlap on the text provided on the screen with a ListView. Further working with this dependency was easier than working with others as it seems well designed.

The Search Bar was added in the Saved Experiments section which contains a lot of default experiments along with their respective manuals. The search bar was intended to provide the user with a greater UI so that they don’t need to navigate through sections every time to find an experiment.

This blog is a step by step guide on how to implement it in any app.

  1. First, add dependencies in the gradle at both project level and app level. By adding these dependencies, we don’t need to worry about writing code for how the Search Bar will filter searches and how it will be placed on the screen.

App Level :

'com.github.mirrajabi:search-dialog:1.1'

Project Level :

maven { url "https://jitpack.io" }
  1.  Create a SearchModel class which will help to carry out the search operations.
public class SearchModel implements Searchable {

	private String mTitle;

	public SearchModel(String mTitle) {
    	this.mTitle = mTitle;
	}

	public void setTitle(String mTitle) {
    	this.mTitle = mTitle;
	}

	@Override
	public String getTitle() {
    	return mTitle;
	}
}

The SearchModel class helps to communicate with the filtered search results by returning the string which is selected:

  • SearchModel(String string) – It is a default constructor
  • setTitle(String string) – It is a method used to set the string provided in the search results
  • getTitle() – It is also a method to get the string selected by the user from the filtered search result provided
  1.  Now provide some data which needs to be searched using an ArrayList or by using StringArrays and then converting it to Search Model Object.
private ArrayList<SampleSearchModel> createSampleData(){
        ArrayList<SampleSearchModel> items = new ArrayList<>();
        items.add(new SampleSearchModel("First item"));
        items.add(new SampleSearchModel("Second item"));
        items.add(new SampleSearchModel("Third item"));
        items.add(new SampleSearchModel("Fourth item"));

        return items;
    }
  1.  At last add the constructor in MainActivity to make the search bar.
SimpleSearchDialogCompat(Context context, String title, String searchHint, @Nullable Filter filter, ArrayList<T> items,
SearchResultListener<T> searchResultListener)

All the parameters can be given according to requirement. The function of each and every parameter are as under :

  • Context – Provide context of the current activity
  • String title – To provide title to Search Bar
  • String searchHint – To provide hint text to the user
  • Filter – To provide any additional filters to the search made by the user
  • ArrayList<T> – To provide data that can be searched
  • SearchResultListener<T> – The method which handles what to do when a user clicks on the filtered searches provided

Let’s try to search for the Piezo Buzzer and UltraSonic Range Finder Experiments in the Search Bar :

Figure 1. GIF of implemented Search Bar

So, in this way, I have implemented the Search Bar functionality in the PSLab application. One last note that try to practice this widget before implementing it in the main project as it requires some practice of filters as per requirements and also its location needs to be defined as per the requirement of an organization as it can be placed anywhere from the main screen to the toolbar to navigation drawer. Below are some of the useful resources to get best practice.

Resources

  1. https://youtu.be/QyqbRHt1NUE – How to make a search bar like above (By – Harsh Patel (me))
  2. https://github.com/mirrajabi/search-dialog – This is the GitHub Page of the library which I used in making an attractive screen overlaying search bar rather than the old one with the list view placed in the toolbar