Showing location response in SUSI.AI bots

SUSI.AI has a capability to tell the basic information about a location, it is asked for. Along with the basic information about that place, it shows a map (i.e. open street map) pointing to that location. The task at hand is to inculcate this “location” feature to the SUSI.AI messenger bots. The SUSI Tweetbot and SUSI Fbbot are used as examples in this blog.

Let’s first check on what response do we get, when a person asks a query like “where is london” to the SUSI API. Along with the basic information about that location, the result as shown below has the type of reply (i.e. map), latitude, longitude and a link to the open street map.

"actions": [
      {
        "type": "answer",
        "language": "en",
        "expression": "Ludhiana is a city and a municipal corporation in Ludhiana district in the Indian state of Punjab, and is the largest city north of Delhi."
      },
      {
        "type": "anchor",
        "link": "https://www.openstreetmap.org/#map=13/30.912040570244187/75.85379021980509",
        "text": "Here is a map",
        "language": "en"
      },
      {
        "type": "map",
        "latitude": "30.912040570244187",
        "longitude": "75.85379021980509",
        "zoom": "13",
        "language": "en"
      }
    ]

The response for a location type query has these 3 main parts:

  1. Clickable static map image.
  2. A basic information of the place asked about.
  3. The link i.e. when the static map image is clicked it should redirect to the corresponding map location.

Let’s try to make up with the 1st part of the response i.e. Static map image.

The map quest API is used to result in a static map image of the location. We need an API key to access the map quest API, which can be requested from their developer site.

Along with that we need the latitude and longitude of the location at hand.

The SUSI API’s response helps us to get the latitude value:

// if body represents the response object 
var lat = body.answers[0].actions[2].latitude;

And the longitude value:

var lon = body.answers[0].actions[2].longitude;

Using the three values that are API key, latitude and longitude, the static image is rendered by this link:

var static_image_url = "https://open.mapquestapi.com/staticmap/v4/getmap?key=API_KEY&size=600,400&zoom=13&center="+lat+","+lon;

The second part is, basic information about the place asked, can be fetched from:

// if body is the JSON response object from SUSI API
var mapMessage = body.answers[0].actions[0].expression;

The link to the map location can be easily fetched from the SUSI API’s response:

var link = body.answers[0].actions[1].link;

As all the three parts are ready, let’s look on how to render them on the SUSI.AI bot’s screen.

Facebook:

Sending a generic template message object:

message = {
        "type":"template",
        "payload":{
                    "template_type":"generic",
                    "elements":[{
                        "title": mapMessage,
                       "image_url": static_image_url,
                       "Item_url": link
                    }]
        }
};

sendTextMessage(sender, message, 1);

Twitter:

The Twitter API does not need a static image of the map to be rendered. It does that work for us. We just need to send an event to the Twitter API with the message data object constituting of the map message, the latitude and longitude values:

"message_data": {
            "text": mapMessage,
            "attachment": {
                "type": "location",
                "location": {
                    "type": "shared_coordinate",
                    "shared_coordinate": {
                        "coordinates": {
                            "type": "Point",
                            "coordinates": [lon, lat]
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
}

Resources:

  1. Speed up customer service with quick replies and welcome messages by Ian Cairns from Twitter blog.
  2. Drive discovery of bots and other customer experiences in direct messages by By Travis Lull from Twitter blog.
  3. By Seth Rosenberg from Facebook developers blogLink Ads to Messenger, Enhanced Mobile Websites, Payments and More.
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Showing sample queries in SUSI.AI Bots

We need to give the user a good start to their chat with SUSI.AI. Engaging the users with some good skills at the start of the conversation, can leave a good impression about SUSI.AI. In SUSI messenger bots, we show up with some sample queries to try, during the conversation with SUSI.AI. In this blog, SUSI_Tweetbot and SUSI_FBbot are used as examples.

These queries are shown as quick replies i.e. the user can click on any of these sample queries and get an answer from SUSI.AI.  

Facebook:

When the user clicks on the “Start chatting” button, we send a descriptive message on what can the user ask to SUSI.AI .

Code snippet used for this step is:

var queryUrl = 'http://api.susi.ai/susi/chat.json?q='+'Start+chatting';
var startMessage = '';
// Wait until done and reply
request({
        url: queryUrl,
        json: true
}, function (error, response, body) {
if (!error && response.statusCode === 200) {
        startMessage = body.answers[0].actions[0].expression;
    }
else{
    startMessage = errMessage;
    }
sendTextMessage(sender, startMessage, 0);

Just a text message is not much engaging. To further enhance the experience of the user, we show some quick reply options to the user. We have finalized some skills to show to the user:

Due to the character limit for the text shown on buttons, we try to show short queries as shown in the above picture. This way the user gets an idea about what type of queries can be asked.

Generic template, help us achieve this feature in SUSI_FBbot.

The code snippet used:

var messageT = {
               "type": "template",
               "payload": {
                "template_type": "generic",
                "elements": [{
                                    "title": 'You can try the following:',
                                    "buttons": [{                                               
                                               "type":"postback",
                                               "title":"What is FOSSASIA?",                                  
                                               "payload":"What is FOSSASIA?"            
                                            }]
                            }]
                }
            };
sendTextMessage(sender, messageT, 1);

As seen in the code above, each button has a corresponding postback text. So that whenever that button is clicked the postback text is sent to our chat automatically:

This postback text acts as a query to SUSI API which fetches the response from the server and shows it back to the user.

Twitter:

As SUSI.AI bots must be generic among all the messenger platforms available , we will inculcate the same skills available in SUSI_FBbot to SUSI_Tweetbot. The quick reply feature provided by Twitter devs help us to accomplish this task at hand.

As in SUSI_FBbot a descriptive message is shown to the users first and then some quick reply options following it.

Message_create event helps in adding quick replies:

var msg = {
               "event": {
               "type": "message_create",
               "message_create": {
                   "target": {
                       "recipient_id": senderId
                    },
                    "message_data": {
                        "text": "You can try the following:",
                        "quick_reply": {
                            "type": "options",
                            "options": [{
                                "label": "What is FOSSASIA?",
                                "metadata": "external_id_4"
                            }]
                        }
                    }
                }
           }
    };
T.post('direct_messages/events/new', msg, sent);

One thing to keep in mind while coding is to send the quick reply message after the initial descriptive message i.e. the code used to send quick replies should be written inside the function, which sends the descriptive message first and aafter that step is complete it runs the code for quick replies. If we accidentally write quick reply code outside that function, it’s highly likely to find bugs in the replies by SUSI.AI.

Resources

  1. Speed up customer service with quick replies and welcome messages by Ian Cairns from Twitter blog.
  2. Link Ads to Messenger, Enhanced Mobile Websites, Payments and More by Seth Rosenberg from Facebook developers blog
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Making SUSI.AI reach more users through messenger bots

SUSI.AI learns from the queries asked to it by the users. More are the number of queries asked, the better is the learning by SUSI.AI. More are the number of users involved with SUSI.AI, better is the amount of content available to SUSI to learn from. Now, the challenge in front of us is to indulge more users with SUSI.AI. In this blog post, SUSI Tweetbot and SUSI FBbot are used as examples to show how we increase our user base through messenger bots.

Twitter:

Twitter has a 328 million user base according to this article’s data. Integration of SUSI.AI to just Twitter makes it available to around 300 million users. Even if some percentage of these users start using SUSI.AI, increase in the user base of SUSI.AI could be exponential. Increasing the user base is advantageous as it provides with more training data for SUSI.AI to learn from.

Sharing by public tweet:

Integrating to it is just the first step towards increasing SUSI.AI’s user base. Next step is to reach the users and indulge them into chatting with SUSI.AI.

Suppose a user asked something to SUSI.AI and really liked the reply from it. He/she wants to share it with his/her followers. This can prove to be a golden opportunity for us, to increase the reach of SUSI.AI. This way we can indulge their friends to try SUSI.AI and have an amazing time with it.

It becomes clear that sharing messages is an indispensable feature and can help us a lot. Twitter doesn’t provide sharing with friends through direct messages but with a feature much better than it. We can share that message as a public tweet and cover more users including the followers of the user.

 

To show this button we use Call to action support by twitter:

"message_data": {
          "text": txt,
          "ctas": [{
                      "type": "web_url",
                      "label": "Share with your followers",
                      "url": ""
          }]
}

The url key in the above code must have a value that redirects to a U.I. that allows to publicly tweet this reply by SUSI.AI.

Using this “https://twitter.com/intent/tweet?text=” as the url value shows a new page with an empty tweet message, as the text query in the url has no value. We set the text field with a value such that we end up like this:

and after tweeting it:

Sending a direct message link with the tweet:

Twitter provides with a lot of features when sending direct messages. Shifting a user from tweets to direct messages is beneficial in a way that we can efficiently tell the user about the capabilities of SUSI.AI and show important links to him/her like of its repository, web chat client etc.

When a user tweets to the SUSI.AI page with a query, we reply with a tweet back to the user. Along with that, we provide a link to privately message SUSI.AI account if the user wants to.

This way if user ends up visiting SUSI.AI in a chat window:

To achieve this in SUSI Tweetbot, Twitter provides with a direct message url. This url – https://twitter.com/messages/compose?recipient_id= redirects us to the chat window of the account having that recipient id, passed as a query string. In our case the url turns out to be – https://twitter.com/messages/compose?recipient_id=871446601000202244 as “871446601000202244” is the recipient id of @SusiAI1 account on twitter.

If we send this url as a text in our “tweet back” to the user, Twitter beautifully shows it as a clickable button with the label as “send a private message” as shown above.

Hence we call the tweet function like this:

tweetIt('@' + from + ' ' + message + date +"\nhttps://twitter.com/messages/compose?recipient_id=871446601000202244");

Facebook:

As we all know Facebook is the giant of social networking sites. Integrating SUSI.AI to Facebook is beneficial for us.

Unlike Twitter, in Facebook we can share messages with other friends through direct messaging to them. The last topic of this blog post walks you through on adding sharing feature in SUSI FBbot:

We also take advantage from the SUSI FBbot to make SUSI.AI better. We can direct the users using SUSI messenger bots to SUSI.AI repository and show them all the required information on how to contribute to the project.

The best way to do this is by showing a “How to contribute” button when the user clicks on “Get started” in the messenger bot.

This blog post will help you showing buttons along with the replies (by SUSI.AI).

When the user clicks this button, we send two messages back to the user as shown:

This way through bots, we have somehow got the user to visit SUSI.AI repository and contribute to it or indulge him/her in the discussion, through our Gitter channel on what can be the next steps in improving SUSI.AI.

Resources:

  1. Link Ads to Messenger, Enhanced Mobile Websites, Payments and More by Seth Rosenberg from Facebook developers blog.
  2. Drive discovery of bots and other customer experiences in direct messages by  Travis Lull from Twitter blog.
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Advanced functionality in SUSI Tweetbot

SUSI AI is integrated to Twitter (blog). During the initial phase, SUSI Tweetbot had basic UI and functionalities like just “plain text” replies. Twitter provides with many more features like quick replies i.e. presenting to the user with some choices to choose from or visiting SUSI server repository by just clicking buttons during the chat etc.

All these features are provided to enhance the user experience with our chatbot on Twitter.

This blog post walks you through on adding these functionalities to the SUSI Tweetbot:

  1. Quick replies
  2. Buttons

    Quick replies:

    This feature provides options to the user to choose from.

    The user doesn’t need to type the next query but rather select a quick reply from the options available. This speeds up the process and makes it easy for the user. Also, it helps developers know all the possible queries which can come next, from the user. Hence, it helps in efficient coding on how to handle those queries.In SUSI Tweetbot this feature is used to welcome a new user to the SUSI A.I.’s chat window, as shown in the image above. The user can select any option among “Get started” and “Start chatting”.The “Get started” option is basically for introduction of SUSI A.I. to the user. While, “Start chatting” when clicked shows the user of what all queries the user can try.Let’s come to the code part on how to show these options and what events happen when a user selects one of the options.

    To show the Welcome message, we call SUSI API with the query as string “Welcome” and store the reply in message variable. The code snippet used:

var queryUrl = 'http://api.susi.ai/susi/chat.json?q=Welcome';
var message = '';
request({
    url: queryUrl,
    json: true
}, function (err, response, data) {
    if (!err && response.statusCode === 200) {
        message = data.answers[0].actions[0].expression;
    } 
    else {
        // handle error
    }
});

To show options with the message:

var msg =  {
        "welcome_message" : {
                    "message_data": {
                        "text": message,
                        "quick_reply": {
                              "type": "options",
                              "options": [
                                {
                                  "label": "Get started",
                                  "metadata": "external_id_1"
                                },
                                {
                                  "label": "Start chatting",
                                  "metadata": "external_id_2"
                                }
                              ]
                            }
                    }
                      }
       };
T.post('direct_messages/welcome_messages/new', msg, sent);

The line T.post() makes a POST request to the Twitter API, to register the welcome message with Twitter for our chatbot. The return value from this request includes a welcome message id in it corresponding to this welcome message.

We set up a welcome message rule for this welcome message using it’s id. By setting up the rule is to set this welcome message as the default welcome message shown to new users. Twitter also provides with custom welcome messages, information about which can be found in their official docs.

The welcome message rule is set up by sending the welcome message id as a key in the request body:

var welcomeId = data.welcome_message.id;
var welcomeRule = {
            "welcome_message_rule": {
                "welcome_message_id": welcomeId
            }
};
T.post('direct_messages/welcome_messages/rules/new', welcomeRule, sent);

Now, we are all set to show the new users with a welcome message.

Buttons:

Let’s go a bit further. If the user clicks on the option “Get started”, we want to show a basic introduction of SUSI A.I. to the user. Along with that we provide some buttons to visit the SUSI A.I. repository or experience chatting with SUSI A.I. on the web client.

The procedure followed to show buttons is almost the same as followed in case of options.This doc by Twitter proves to be helpful to get familiar with buttons.

As soon as a person clicks on “Get started” option, Twitter sends a message to our bot with the query as “Get started”.

For the message part, we call SUSI API with the query as string “Get started” and store the reply in a message variable. The code snippet used:

var queryUrl = 'http://api.susi.ai/susi/chat.json?q=Get+started';
var message = '';
request({
    url: queryUrl,
    json: true
}, function (err, response, data) {
    if (!err && response.statusCode === 200) {
        message = data.answers[0].actions[0].expression;
    } 
    else {
        // handle error
    }
});

Both the buttons to be shown with the message should have a corresponding url. So that after clicking the button a person is redirected to that url in a new browser tab.

To show buttons a simple message won’t help, we need to create an event. This event constitutes of our message and buttons. The buttons are referred to as call-to-action i.e. CTAs by Twitter dev’s. The maximum number of buttons in an event can not be more than three in number.

The code used to make an event in our case:

var msg = {
        "event": {
                "type": "message_create",
                "message_create": {
                              "target": {
                                "recipient_id": sender
                              },
                              "message_data": {
                                "text": message,
                                "ctas": [
                                  {
                                    "type": "web_url",
                                    "label": "View Repository",
                                    "url": "https://www.github.com/fossasia/susi_server"
                                  },
                                  {
                                    "type": "web_url",
                                    "label": "Chat on the web client",
                                    "url": "http://chat.susi.ai"
                                  }
                                ]
                              }
                            }
            }
        };

T.post('direct_messages/events/new', msg, sent);

The line T.post() makes a POST request to the Twitter API, to send this event to the concerned recipient guiding them on how to get started with the bot.

Resources:

  1. Speed up customer service with quick replies and welcome messages by Ian Cairns from Twitter blog.
  2. Drive discovery of bots and other customer experiences in direct messages by Travis Lull from Twitter blog.
Continue Reading

Integration of SUSI AI in Twitter

We will be making a Susi messenger bot on Twitter. The messenger bot will tweet back to your tweets and reply instantly when you chat with it. Feel free to tweet to the already made SUSI AI account (mentioning @SusiAI1 in it). Follow it, to have a personal chat.

Make a new account, which you want to use as the bot account. You can make one from sign up option from https://www.twitter.com.

Prerequisites

To create your account on -:
1. Twitter
2. Github
3. Heroku
4. Node js

Setup your own Messenger Bot

1. Make a new app here, to know the access token and other properties for our application. These properties will help us communicate with Twitter.

Click “modify the app permissions” link, as shown here:

Select the Read, Write and Access direct messages option:

Don’t forget to click the update settings button at the bottom.

Click the Generate My Access Token and Token Secret button.

3. Create a new heroku app here.

This app will accept the requests from Twitter and Susi api.

4. Create a config variable by switching to settings page of your app.
  
  The name of your first config variable should be HEROKU_URL and its value is the url address of the heroku app created by you.
 

The other config variables that need to be created will be these:
 

The corresponding names of these variables in the same order are:
  i) Access token
  ii) Access token secret
  iii) Consumer key
  iv) Consumer secret
  
We need to visit our app from here, the keys and access tokens tab will help us with the values of these variables.

  1. Let’s start with the code part of the integration of SUSI AI to Twitter. We will be using Node js to achieve this integration.

First we need to require some packages:

Now using the Twit module, we need to authenticate our requests, by using our environment variables as set up in step 4:

Now let’s make a user stream:

var stream = T.stream('user');

We will be using the capabilities of this stream, to catch events of getting tweeted or receiving a direct message by using:

stream.on('tweet', functionToBeCalledWhenTweeted);
stream.on('follow', functionToBeCalledWhenFollowed);
stream.on('direct_message', functionToBeCalledWhenDirectMessaged);

So, when a person tweets to our account like this:

We can catch it with ‘tweet’ event and execute a set of instructions:

stream.on('tweet', tweetEvent);

    function tweetEvent(eventMsg) {
        var replyto = eventMsg.in_reply_to_screen_name;     

       // to store the message tweeted excluding '@SusiAI1' substring
        var text = eventMsg.text.substring(9);

        // to store the name of the tweeter
        var from = eventMsg.user.screen_name;
        
        if (replyto === 'SusiAI1') {
            var queryUrl = 'http://api.asksusi.com/susi/chat.json?q=' + encodeURI(text);
            var message = '';
            request({
                url: queryUrl,
                json: true
            }, function (err, response, data) {
                if (!err && response.statusCode === 200) {
                    // fetching the answer from the data object returned
                                        message = data.answers[0].actions[0].expression + data;


                }
                else {
                    message = 'Oops, Looks like Susi is taking a break';    
                    console.log(err);
                }
                console.log(message);
                // If the message length is more than tweet limit
                if(message.length > 140){
                    tweetIt('@' + from + ' Sorry due to tweet word limit, I have sent you a personal message. Check inbox'+date);
                    sendMessage(from, message);
                }
                else{
                    tweetIt('@' + from + ' ' + message + date);
                }
            });
        }
    }
  • When we a person follows this SUSI AI account, we can thank him/her by making use of the “follow” event. Also, we need to follow him/her back, to enable personal chat between Susi and that person (according to the rules of twitter):
stream.on('follow',followed);

function followed(eventMsg) {
        console.log('Follow event !');
        var name = eventMsg.source.name;
        var screenName = eventMsg.source.screen_name;
        var user_id1 = eventMsg.source.id_str;

        // To follow back the person.
        T.post('friendships/create', {user_id : user_id1},  function(err, tweets, response){
            if (err) {
                console.log("Couldn't follow back!");
            } 
            else {    
tweetIt('@' + screenName + ' Thank you for following me! I followed you back, you can also direct message me now! ');
                console.log("Followed back!");
            } 
        }); 
    }

When we personally message this SUSI AI account

This can be handled through the ‘direct_message’ event:

stream.on('direct_message', reply);
    function reply(directMsg) {
        console.log('You receive a message!');
        // If its our own bot messaging, ignore it, as this can lead to an infinite loop when we answer a user.
        if (directMsg.direct_message.sender_screen_name === 'SusiAI1') {
            return;
        }

        // code to fetch the reply from SUSI API
        
        // reply the user with the SUSI API's message
        sendMessage(directMsg.direct_message.sender_screen_name, message);
        });
    }
  • The tweetIt and sendMessage function code can be seen from the repo code.

6. Connect the heroku app to the forked repository.

Connect the app to Github by selecting the name of this forked repository.

7. Deploy on development branch. If you intend to contribute, it is recommended to Enable Automatic Deploys.

Branch Deployment.

Successful Deployment.

  1. Visit your own personal account and tweet to this new bot account with your query and enjoy a tweet back from the bot account! Also, you can enjoy personal chatting with Susi.

    Feel free to play around with the already made SUSI AI account on twitter here. Follow it, to have a personal chat with it.

    Resources
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