Connecting SUSI iOS App to SUSI Smart Speaker

SUSI Smart Speaker is an Open Source speaker with many exciting features. The user needs an Android or iOS device to set up the speaker. You can refer this post for initial connection to SUSI Smart Speaker. In this post, we will see how a user can connect SUSI Smart Speaker to iOS devices (iPhone/iPad).

Implementation –

The first step is to detect whether an iOS device connects to SUSI.AI hotspot or not. For this, we match the currently connected wifi SSID with SUSI.AI hotspot SSID. If it matches, we show the connected device in Device Activity to proceed further with setups.

Choosing Room –

Room name is basically the location of your SUSI Smart Speaker in the home. You may have multiple SUSI Smart Speaker in different rooms, so the purpose of adding the room is to differentiate between them.

When the user clicks on Wi-Fi displayed cell, it starts the initial setups. We are using didSelectRowAt method of UITableViewDelegate to get which cell is selected. On clicking the displayed Wi-Fi cell, a popup is open with a Room Location Text field.

override func tableView(_ tableView: UITableView, didSelectRowAt indexPath: IndexPath) {
if indexPath.row == 0, let speakerSSID = fetchSSIDInfo(), speakerSSID == ControllerConstants.DeviceActivity.susiSSID {
// Open a popup to select Rooms
presentRoomsPopup()
}
}

When the user clicks the Next button, we send the speaker room location to the local server of the speaker by the following API endpoint with room name as a parameter:

http://10.0.0.1:5000/speaker_config/

Refer this post for getting more detail about how choosing room work and how it is implemented in SUSI iOS.

Sharing Wi-Fi Credentials –

On successfully choosing the room, we present a popup that asks the user to enter the Wi-Fi credentials of previously connected Wi-Fi so that we can connect our Smart Speaker to the wifi which can provide internet connection to play music and set commands over the speaker.

We present a popup with a text field for entering wifi password.

When the user clicks the Next button, we share the wifi credentials to wifi by the following API endpoint:

http://10.0.0.1:5000/wifi_credentials/

With the following params-

  1. Wifissid – Connected Wi-Fi SSID
  2. Wifipassd – Connected Wi-Fi password

In this API endpoint, we are sharing wifi SSID and wifi password with Smart Speaker. If the credentials successfully accepted by speaker than we present a popup for user SUSI account password, otherwise we again present Enter Wifi Credentials popup.

Client.sharedInstance.sendWifiCredentials(params) { (success, message) in
DispatchQueue.main.async {
self.alertController.dismiss(animated: true, completion: nil)
if success {
self.presentUserPasswordPopup()
} else {
self.view.makeToast("", point: self.view.center, title: message, image: nil, completion: { didTap in
UIApplication.shared.endIgnoringInteractionEvents()
self.presentWifiCredentialsPopup()
})
}
}
}

 

Sharing SUSI Account Credentials –

In the method above we have seen that when SUSI Smart Speaker accept the wifi credentials, we proceed further with SUSI account credentials. We open a popup to Enter user’s SUSI account password:

When the user clicks the Next button, we use following API endpoint to share user’s SUSI account credentials to SUSI Smart Speaker:

http://10.0.0.1:5000/auth/

With the following params-

  1. email
  2. password

User email is already saved in the device so the user doesn’t have to type it again. If the user credentials successfully accepted by speaker then we proceed with configuration process otherwise we open up Enter Password popup again.

Client.sharedInstance.sendAuthCredentials(params) { (success, message) in
DispatchQueue.main.async {
self.alertController.dismiss(animated: true, completion: nil)
if success {
self.setConfiguration()
} else {
self.view.makeToast("", point: self.view.center, title: message, image: nil, completion: { didTap in
UIApplication.shared.endIgnoringInteractionEvents()
self.presentUserPasswordPopup()
})
}
}
}

 

Setting Configuration –

After successfully sharing SUSI account credentials, following API endpoint is using for setting configuration.

http://10.0.0.1:5000/config/

With the following params-

  1. sst
  2. tts
  3. hotword
  4. wake

The success of this API call makes successfully connection between user iOS Device and SUSI Smart Speaker.

Client.sharedInstance.setConfiguration(params) { (success, message) in
DispatchQueue.main.async {
if success {
// Successfully Configured
self.isSetupDone = true
self.view.makeToast(ControllerConstants.DeviceActivity.doneSetupDetailText)
} else {
self.view.makeToast("", point: self.view.center, title: message, image: nil, completion: { didTap in
UIApplication.shared.endIgnoringInteractionEvents()
})
}
}
}

After successful connection-

 

Resources –

  1. Apple’s Documentation of tableView(_:didSelectRowAt:) API
  2. Initial Setups for Connecting SUSI Smart Speaker with iPhone/iPad
  3. SUSI Linux Link: https://github.com/fossasia/susi_linux
  4. Adding Option to Choose Room for SUSI Smart Speaker in iOS App
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Implementing Volume Action in SUSI Smart Speaker

We all know that a Smart Speaker to excel above its competitors has to excel in first being a good “Speaker” and a speaker has a basic and essential feature which is “volume control”. But things get better if you can control your volume with your voice.

So, we have implemented a feature that allows the user to control the volume of the audio with his/her voice.

Below are the steps we had to follow to implement this feature

 

Step 1: Creating the Skills

The skills required to implement the ‘volume-action’ is implemented in the SUSI Server repo itself.

The skill is located in

susi_server/conf/system_skills/general/en/en_0001_foundation.txt

 

And below are the skills required

 

set audio volume to *|set audio volume to * percent|set audio volume to * points|set volume to *|set volume to * percent|set volume to * points
!console:Audio volume is now $1$ percent.
{“actions”:[
{“type”:“audio_volume”, “volume”:$1$}
]}
eol

 

We get the following response from the server

 

“actions”: [
     {
       “volume”: “80”,
       “type”: “audio_volume”
     },
     {
       “type”: “answer”,
       “expression”: “Audio volume is now 80 percent.”
     }

 

Step 2: Finding Volume Action in the server response

Now that our Server responds to our queries regarding the voice change action , we must implement it in our Smart Speaker Client.


We first create a custom class in our in the SUSI API Wrapper repo which has only one member

 

class VolumeAction(BaseAction):
   def __init__(self , volume):
       super().__init__()
       self.volume = volume

 

We check through the actions in the server’s response

 

elif isinstance(action, VolumeAction):
           result[‘volume’] = action.volume

 

Step 3: Implementing it in the client

Now to implement the action in our client we use a library called ‘alsaaudio’ to control the master volume of our RaspberryPi

 

              m = alsaaudio.Mixer()
               m.setvolume(int(reply[‘volume’]))
               os.system(‘play {0} &’.format(self.components.config[‘detection_bell_sound’]))  # nosec #pylint-disable type: ignore                m = alsaaudio.Mixer()
               m.setvolume(int(reply[‘volume’]))
               os.system(‘play {0} &’.format(self.components.config[‘detection_bell_sound’]))  # nosec #pylint-disable type: ignore

 

Now the user can easily change the speaker using the voice commands

References

 

Tags

GSoC, GSoC’18, SUSI.AI, SUSI Linux, Smart Speaker , SUSI API Wrapper, SUSI Server, FOSSASIA, Volume Action

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Using a Flask Server to Connect to SUSI smart speaker

A smart speaker becomes significantly smarter when it is connected to a Smart-Phone.

So, we added a way to connect the Smart-Phone to the Smart Speaker and initiate the first way towards a Smart Home.

Use a simple HTTP connection protocol and deploy a light-weight server on the Raspberry Pi to allow connection from a mobile phone.

Step 1: Setting Up the server

Use flask to deploy a light-weight server on the raspberry pi. We’ll install flask using raspbian repos.

 

1>Install Flask by using the following command

sudo apt-get install python3-flask

 

2> Setting up the boilerplate code.

Open the terminal and type the following commands

`

mkdir server_app
cd server_app

touch app.py

`

 

Add the following code to your app.py file. This create a server at localhost:5000

 

from flask import Flask

app = Flask(__name__)

@app.route(‘/’)
def index():
   return ‘Hello world’

if __name__ == ‘__main__’:
   app.run(debug=False, host=‘0.0.0.0’)  #This will allow the server to be accessible on all devices

 

Step 2: Adding Endpoints

Now , add endpoints which will trigger the scripts during initialisation of the raspberry Pi. This will trigger the respective endpoints

@app.route(‘/auth/<auth>/<email>/<passwd>’)
def login(auth, email, passwd):
os.system(‘sudo ./login.sh {} {} {}’.format(auth, email,passwd)) #nosec #pylint-disable type: ignore
return ‘Authenticated’ # [email protected](‘/wifi_credentials/<wifissid>/<wifipassd>’)
def wifi_config(wifissid,wifipassd):
wifi_ssid = wifissid
wifi_password = wifipassd
os.system(‘sudo ./home/pi/SUSI.AI/susi_linux/access_point/wifi_search.sh {} {}’.format(wifi_ssid,wifi_password))  #nosec #pylint-disable type: ignore
return ‘Wifi Configured’ # pylint-enable

 

Step 3: Connecting to the endpoints

Now, try and hit the API endpoints to get the response.

eg.As shown in the above example, you will be getting a single line response and will execute a bash script behind the scenes

Now you can access the other endpoints and configure the clients with the SUSI Smart Speaker

References

 

Tags

fossasia,GSoC,Python, Flask , raspberryPi, SUSI,smart-speaker,FOSSASIA

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Creating an Update Daemon for SUSI Smart Speaker

A daemon in reference of operating systems is a computer program that runs as a background process rather than under direct control of the user. Various daemons are being used in SUSI smart speaker.

The following daemons have been created

  • Update Daemon
  • Media Discovery Daemon
  • Factory Reset Daemon 

In this blog, we’ll be discussing the implementation of the Update Daemon in SUSI.AI

Update Daemon

Due to the ever-growing coding community, it is needed to provide regular updates to the smart speaker and keep it in sync with the latest technology. Hence an Update Daemon was required that could fetch updates at a regular interval.

The Updated Daemon was implemented in the following steps

1.Deciding the Update Interval

How frequently should we check for updates was the first question that was tackled while implementing this daemon.
We decided that we should check for Update, every time the Raspberry Pi starts and an internet connection was available.

2. Implementing The Decision

To start the Update script every time the Raspberry Pi starts, we decided to create Systemd rules.

[Unit]
Description=Update Check- SUSI Linux
Wants=network-online.target
After=network-online.target

[Service]
Type=oneshot
ExecStart=/home/pi/SUSI.AI/susi_linux/update_daemon/update_check.sh

[Install]
WantedBy=multi-user.target

The above rule waits for a network connection to be established with the Raspberry Pi and then triggers a bash script that fetches updates

3. Fetching The Updates


Now, a bash script was prepared that would fetch the latest changes from the online repo and merge the latest changes in the local repo

 

#!/bin/sh

UPSTREAM=${1:-‘@{u}’}
LOCAL=$(git rev-parse @)
REMOTE=$(git rev-parse “$UPSTREAM”)
BASE=$(git merge-base @ “$UPSTREAM”)
CHECK=”
if [ $LOCAL = $REMOTE ]
then
   echo “Up-to-date”
   CHECK=’up-to-date
elif [ $LOCAL = $BASE ]
then
   echo “Need to pull”
   CHECK=”Need-to-pull”
else
   echo “Diverged”
fi

if [$CHECK = “Need-to-pull”]
then
   git fetch UPSTREAM
   git merge UPSTREAM/master
fi

 

Resources

Tags

 

susi.ai, gsoc, gsoc’18, fossasia, update, daemon, update_daemon, smart speaker, systemd, hardware

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Creating a Media Daemon for SUSI Smart Speaker

A daemon in reference of operating systems is a computer program that runs as a background process rather than under direct control of the user. Various daemons are being used in SUSI smart speaker.

The following features have been created

  • Update Daemon
  • Media Discovery Daemon
  • Factory Reset Daemon

In this blog, we’ll be discussing the implementation of the Media Discovery Daemon

Media Discovery Daemon:

The SUSI Smart speaker will have an essential feature which will allow the Users to play music from their USB devices. Hence , a media daemon will be running which will detect a USB connection and then scan it’s contents checking for all the mp3 files and then create custom SUSI skills to allow SUSI Smart Speaker to play music from your USB device.

 

The Media Daemon was implemented in the following steps

1.UDEV Rules

We had to figure out a way to run our daemon as soon as the user inserted the USB storage and stop the daemon as soon as the USB storage was removed

 

So, we used UDEV rules to trigger the Media Daemon.

 

ACTION==“add”, KERNEL==“sd?”, SUBSYSTEM==“block”, ENV{ID_BUS}==“usb”, RUN=“/home/pi/SUSI.AI/susi_linux/media_daemon/autostart.sh”ACTION==“remove, KERNEL==“sd?”, SUBSYSTEM==“block”, ENV{ID_BUS}==“usb”, RUN=“/home/pi/SUSI.AI/susi_linux/media_daemon/autostop.sh”

The Udev rules trigger a script called ‘autostart.sh’  on USB detection and a script called ‘autostop.sh’ on USB removal.

2. Custom Skill Creation

As the USB connection is now detected ,a script is triggered which checks the presence of a  local SUSI server in the repo. If a local server instance is detected,a python script is triggered which parses through the USB mount point and checks for the list of mp3 files present in the storage device and then create a custom skill file in the local server instance.

 

media_daemon_folder = os.path.dirname(os.path.abspath(__file__))
base_folder = os.path.dirname(media_daemon_folder)
server_skill_folder = os.path.join(base_folder, ‘susi_server/susi_server/data/generic_skills/media_discovery’)
server_settings_folder = os.path.join(base_folder, ‘susi_server/susi_server/data/settings’)

def make_skill(): # pylint-enable
   name_of_usb = get_mount_points()
   print(type(name_of_usb))
   print(name_of_usb[0])
   x = name_of_usb[0]
   os.chdir(‘{}’.format(x[1]))
   USB = name_of_usb[0]
   mp3_files = glob(“*.mp3”)
   f = open( media_daemon_folder +‘/custom_skill.txt’,‘w’)
   music_path = list()
   for mp in mp3_files:
       music_path.append(“{}”.format(USB[1]) + “/{}”.format(mp))

   song_list = ” “.join(music_path)
   skills = [‘play audio’,‘!console:Playing audio from your usb device’,‘{“actions”:[‘,‘{“type”:”audio_play”, “identifier_type”:”url”, “identifier”:”file://’+str(song_list) +‘”}’,‘]}’,‘eol’]
   for skill in skills:
       f.write(skill + ‘\n’)
   f.close()
   shutil.move( media_daemon_folder + ‘custom_skill.txt’, server_skill_folder)
   f2 = open(server_settings_folder + ‘customized_config.properties’,‘a’)
   f2.write(‘local.mode = true’)
   f2.close()

def get_usb_devices():
   sdb_devices = map(os.path.realpath, glob(‘/sys/block/sd*’))
   usb_devices = (dev for dev in sdb_devices
       if ‘usb’ in dev.split(‘/’)[5])
   return dict((os.path.basename(dev), dev) for dev in usb_devices)

def get_mount_points(devices=None):
   devices = devices or get_usb_devices() # if devices are None: get_usb_devices
   output = check_output([‘mount’]).splitlines() #nosec #pylint-disable type: ignore
   output = [tmp.decode(‘UTF-8’) for tmp in output ] # pytlint-enable
   def is_usb(path):
       return any(dev in path for dev in devices)
   usb_info = (line for line in output if is_usb(line.split()[0]))
   return [(info.split()[0], info.split()[2]) for info in usb_info] 

 

Now a custom skill file will be created in the local server instance by the name of `custom_skill.txt` and the user can play audio from USB by speaking the command ‘play audio’

 

3. Preparing for the Next USB insertion

Now if the User wants to update his/her music library or wants to use another USB storage device. The USB will be removed and hence the custom skill file is also deleted from the script ‘autstop.sh’ which is triggered via the UDEV rules

#! /bin/bash

SCRIPT_PATH=$(realpath $0)
DIR_PATH=$(dirname $SCRIPT_PATH)

cd $DIR_PATH/../susi_server/susi_server/data/generic_skills/media_discovery/

sudo rm custom_skill.txt  

 

This is how the Media Discovery Daemon works in SUSI Smart Speaker

 

References

Tags

gsoc, gsoc’18 , fossasia, susi.ai, smart speaker, media daemon, susi skills

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Handle response for API calls to the smart speaker

The SUSI.AI android app has the feature to connect to the smart speaker through the WiFi access point of the smart speaker. This connection takes place without internet and is completely offline and takes place locally between the device and the app.

When the APIs are hit, the parameters are sent to the server and are extracted by the speaker and then stored to perform further actions, but like any other API there is some response sent by the server once the parameters are fetched and only when this response is correctly parsed we show the confirmation that the data was required to be sent to the speaker is successfully done.

The SUSI.AI android app was unable to parse this response and so , every time there was a request made to the speaker the error message was displayed on the screen, just like this :

This is a cropped screenshot of the error message shown.

To handle the response from the local server there was a need to add the response parsing classes in the app, also since the app is written in kotlin the specialised classes for this purpose are already present in kotlin which are specifically for the purpose of handling responses. The data classes are added for the three APIs for the local server that are made, the response class added for the WiFi credentials response is :

data class SpeakerWifiResponse(
      val wifi: String,
      val wifi_ssid: String,
      val wifi_password: String
)

Here the first string by the name of ‘wifi’ is used to display a success message and other two variables are for the ssid and password of the wifi network respectively.

The API that is used to set the configuration of the speaker has the response class as follows  :

data class SpeakerConfigResponse(
      val configuration: String,
      val hotword: String,
      val stt: String,
      val tts: String,
      val wake: String
)

The third API which is used to send the auth credentials to the speaker has the following response class :

data class SpeakerAuthResponse(
      val auth: String,
      val authentication: String,
      val email: String,
      val password: String? = null
)

Now these response classes have the variable name similar to the key values in the JSON response generated by the local server. Due to the similar names to the keys an extra step and extra lines of code are eliminated which had to be added otherwise denoting the “Serializable” values to match the JSON response values.

After these data classes were added the Call<> functions of the retrofit service DeviceApi.java were made of the type of the types of the above data classes , which then were able to successfully parse the response from the local server of the speaker.

So, after this the app to speaker connection was successful and a success message was shown as :

References

 

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Show Option to choose WiFi for Smart Speaker Connection in SUSI.AI Android APP

SUSI.AI android app has the functionality to detect the available WiFi networks and among them check for the hotspot named “SUSI.AI”. Now, this process is required so that the app can connect to the smart speaker and send the WiFi credentials, the authentication credentials and the configuration data to the smart speaker.

After on clicking the “SET UP” button on the available SUSI.AI hotspot as shown in the image below,

The app needs to make API requests where the app will send the data to the speaker, the first API that needs to be hit is for the WiFi credentials. Once the “SET UP” button is clicked the app shows a message “Connecting to your device” with a loader as in the image below :

Now during this step the code to detect the available WiFi networks is run again and the list of the available networks is sent from the DeviceConnectPresenter.kt to the DeviceConnectFragment.kt from the function defined in the presenter as follows :

override fun availableWifi(list: List<ScanResult>) {
  connections = ArrayList<String>()
  for (i in list.indices) {
      connections.add(list[i].SSID)
  }
  if (!list.isEmpty()) {
      deviceConnectView?.setupWiFiAdapter(connections)
  } else {
      deviceConnectView?.onDeviceConnectionError(utilModel.getString(R.string.no_device_found), utilModel.getString(R.string.setup_tut))
  }
}

Now to show the list of available WiFi networks a new ViewHolder had to made which contained a textview and an imageview. The viewholder file named WifiViewHolder.java is responsible for this and is used along with the DeviceAdapter only.

The interesting thing to see is that the DeviceAdapter already inflates the ViewItems of the type DeviceViewHolder. Instead of making a new adapter for the WifiViewHolder view item, I wrote some smart code that handles both the viewholders with the same adapter i.e DeviceAdapter. Let’s now see how this was handled,

In the DeviceAdapter a private variable named viewCode of type integer was made and it would be responsible to segregate the two viewholders using an if command. Here is code below that shows how using viewcode variable allows us to choose and inflate a viewholder among the two we have in onCreateViewHolder() method :

if (viewCode == 1) {
  View v = LayoutInflater.from(parent.getContext()).inflate(R.layout.device_layout, parent, false);
  return new DeviceViewHolder(v, (DeviceConnectPresenter) devicePresenter);
} else {
  View v = LayoutInflater.from(parent.getContext()).inflate(R.layout.layout_wifi_item, parent, false);
  return new WifiViewHolder(v, (DeviceConnectPresenter) devicePresenter);
}

Now, when the viewholder of type WifiViewHolder is inflated the app displays a list of available wifi networks and on clicking any of the Wifi items the app asks the user to enter the credentials of the WiFi network. Below is how the app looks when the available wifi networks are loaded and displayed and also when we click on any of the item in the list.

References :

  1. Android manipulating Wifi networks using WiFiManager : https://medium.com/@josiassena/android-manipulating-wifi-using-the-wifimanager-9af77cb04c6a
  2. Kotlin broadcast intents and receivers : https://www.techotopia.com/index.php/Kotlin_Android_Broadcast_Intents_and_Broadcast_Receivers
  3. Android Viewholder pattern : https://www.javacodegeeks.com/2013/09/android-viewholder-pattern-example.html
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Scan and detect available networks in SUSI.AI Android app

We all have experienced Apple HomPad, Google Home, Alexa etc or read about smart speakers which offer interactive actions over voice commands. Smart speaker uses hotword for activation. They utilize WiFi, bluetooth and other wireless protocols.

SUSI.AI is also coming with an Open Source smart speaker using  as simple as a RaspberryPi for the speaker which can perform various actions like playing music etc over voice commands. To use SUSI Smart Speaker, you have to connect it to the SUSI iOS or Android App. You can manage your connected devices in SUSI Android,SUSI iOS and Web clients. Here we will see initial setups for connecting SUSI Smart Speaker with an Android device.

Unlike iOS, Android allows any app to change the WiFi settings of the phone if the specific permissions are added in the app and on the run time while using the app. To connect to a particular WiFi in android given that permissions are enabled a few lines of code is sufficient enough to connect to the new WiFi network, but in our case before connecting to the WiFi we must know that the SUSI.AI hotspot is available around or not.

To know if the SUSI hotspot is available or not we have to scan for the available WiFi networks present and then choose the SUSI WiFi hotspot.

The app simply detects the available WiFi networks and displays a set of them that have the name SUSI.AI. To detect the available WiFi networks we have used a BroadCastReceiver that listens for the action :

WifiManager.SCAN_RESULTS_AVAILABLE_ACTION

The broadcast receiver listens to this action and fetches the list of networks available. The broadcast receiver is registered after the objects of WifiReceiver class and WifiManager class are declared. Once the broadcast receiver is registered the object of WifiManager is used to start the scanning process of the available Wifi networks.

Here is the object of the WifiManager and WifiReceiver declared in the onCreate() method of the DeviceActivity.kt file :

mainWifi = application.getSystemService(Context.WIFI_SERVICE) as WifiManager
receiverWifi = WifiReceiver()

The broadcast receiver class that scans the available networks is as follows :

inner class WifiReceiver : BroadcastReceiver() {
  override fun onReceive(p0: Context?, p1: Intent?) {
      Timber.d(“Inside the app”)
      if (p1 != null) {
          if (p1.action.equals(WifiManager.SCAN_RESULTS_AVAILABLE_ACTION)) {
              var wifiList: List<ScanResult> = ArrayList<ScanResult>()
              wifiList = mainWifi.getScanResults()
              devicePresenter.inflateList(wifiList)
          }

In the above code all the available networks on scanning are sent to the presenter for further processing.

In the presenter class in the method inflateList() the available WiFi networks list is scanned on the basis of their SSID and all the networks with name are “SUSI.AI” are selected and then displayed as a list to the user.

The inflateList() function is as follows :

override fun inflateList(list: List<ScanResult>) {
  Timber.d(“size “ + list.size)
  connections = ArrayList<String>()
  for (i in list.indices) {
      if (list[i].SSID.equals(utilModel.getString(R.string.device_name)))
          connections.add(list[i].SSID)
  }

  if (connections.size > 0) {
      deviceView?.setupAdapter(connections)
  } else {
      deviceView?.onDeviceConnectionError(utilModel.getString(R.string.no_device_found), utilModel.getString(R.string.setup_tut))
  }
}

Now after the wifi list is scanned the sorted and selected list is sent to the Recycler adapter that will display the list to available SUSI networks to the user.

CONCLUSION :

REFERENCES :

  1. Android Manipulation of wifi using WifiManager : https://medium.com/@josiassena/android-manipulating-wifi-using-the-wifimanager-9af77cb04c6a
  2. Scan and list all Wifi in Android : https://www.nplix.com/scan-list-wifi-network-android/
  3. Kotlin android broadcast receivers : https://www.techotopia.com/index.php/Kotlin_Android_Broadcast_Intents_and_Broadcast_Receivers

 

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Adding Option to Choose Room for SUSI Smart Speaker in iOS App
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Adding Option to Choose Room for SUSI Smart Speaker in iOS App

SUSI Smart Speaker is an open source smart speaker that supports many features. The user can use Android or iOS to connect their device with SUSI Smart Speaker. During initial installation, it is asking from use to enter the Room name. Room name is basically the location of your SUSI Smart Speaker in the home. You may have multiple SUSI Smart Speaker in different rooms, so the purpose of adding the room is to differentiate between them. You can find useful instructions for the initial connection between the iOS device and SUSI Smart Speaker here. It this post, we will see how the adding rooms feature implemented for SUSI iOS.

When the user enters into the Device Activity screen, we check if the iOS device is connected to SUSI.AI Wi-Fi hotspot or not. If the device is connected to SUSI Smart Speaker, it shows the Wi-Fi displayed SSID in Device Activity Screen. On clicking the displayed Wi-Fi cell, a popup is open with a Room Location Text field. The user can enter Room location and by clicking the Next button, proceed further with the setup.

In the popup, there is also an option for choosing rooms, where the list of most common room names is displayed and the user can choose room name from the list.

Presenting Room Picker View Controller –

func presentRoomsPicker() {
let storyboard = UIStoryboard(name: "Main", bundle: nil)
if let roomVC = storyboard.instantiateViewController(withIdentifier: "RoomPickerVC") as? RoomPickerController {
roomVC.deviceActivityVC = self
let roomNVC = AppNavigationController(rootViewController: roomVC)
self.present(roomNVC, animated: true)
}
}

Room Picker View Controller is UITableViewController that display the rooms names in table cells. Some of the most common rooms names displayed are:

let rooms: [String] = ["Bedroom", "Kitchen", "Family Room", "Entryway", "Living Room", "Front Yard", "Guest Room", "Dining Room", "Computer Room", "Downstairs", "Front Porch", "Garage", "Hallway", "Driveway"]

 

Presenting Room Cell –

We are using cellForRowAt method to present the cell.

override func tableView(_ tableView: UITableView, cellForRowAt indexPath: IndexPath) -> UITableViewCell {
let cell = tableView.dequeueReusableCell(withIdentifier: "roomsCell", for: indexPath)
cell.textLabel?.text = rooms[indexPath.row]
cell.imageView?.image = ControllerConstants.Images.roomsIcon
return cell
}

 

Selecting the room from cell –

When the user clicks on the cell, first willSelectRowAt method use to display the right icon in the accessory view that shows which cell is selected.

if let oldIndex = tableView.indexPathForSelectedRow {
tableView.cellForRow(at: oldIndex)?.accessoryType = .none
}
tableView.cellForRow(at: indexPath)?.accessoryType = .checkmark

We are storing the selected room in the following variable and selecting it by using didSelectRowAt method of UITableView.

var selectedRoom: String?
override func tableView(_ tableView: UITableView, didSelectRowAt indexPath: IndexPath) {
selectedRoom = rooms[indexPath.row]
}

In Room Picker Screen, the user has two option, Cancel and Done. If the user clicks the Cancel, we dismiss the Room Picker screen and display the popup with the empty room location text field and with Choose Room option. If the user clicks the Done button, we store the picked room in UserDefaults shared instance and dismiss Room Picker screen with a different popup which has already filled room location in the text field and without choose room option in the popup as in the image below. By clicking the next, the user proceeds with the further setup.

Resources –

  1. Apple’s Documentations on UserDefaults.
  2. Initial Setups for Connecting SUSI Smart Speaker with iPhone/iPad
  3. Apple’s Documentations on tableView(_:cellForRowAt:)
  4. Apple’s Documentations on tableView(_:willSelectRowAt:)
  5. Apple’s Documentations on tableView(_:didSelectRowAt:)
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Initial Setups for Connecting SUSI Smart Speaker with iPhone/iPad

You may have experienced Apple HomPad, Google Home, Alexa etc or read about smart speakers that offer interactive action over voice commands. The smart speaker uses the hot word for activation. They utilize Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and other wireless protocols.

SUSI.AI is also coming with Open Source smart speaker that can do various actions like playing music etc over voice commands. To use SUSI Smart Speaker, you have to connect it to the SUSI iOS or Android App. You can manage your connected devices in SUSI iOS, Android and Web clients. Here we will see initial setups for connecting SUSI Smart Speaker with iPhone/iPad (iOS Devices).

You may aware that iOS does not allow connecting to wifi within the app. To connect to a particular Wi-Fi, you have to go to phone settings, from there you can connect to Wi-Fi. SUSI Smart Speaker create a temporary Hotspot for initial setups. Follow the instruction below to connect to SUSI Smart Speaker hotspot –

  1. Tap to Home button, and go to your iPhone Settings > Wi-Fi
  2. Connect to the Wi-Fi hotspot for the device that you are setting up. It will have name “susi.ai”, like in the image below
  3. Come back to the SUSI app to proceed with setup.

These instruction is also available within the app when you are not connected to SUSI Smart Speaker hotspot and click `Setup a Device` or plus icon on Device Activity screen navigation bar.

Devices Activity and getting current Wi-Fi SSID:

Devices section in Settings screen shows the currently connected device. In Devices Activity screen, the user can manage the connected device. Only a logged-in user can access Devices Activity. When the user clicks on Device Accessories in setting, if the user is not logged-in, an alert is prompted with Login option. By clicking Login option, user directed to Login screen where the user can log in and come back to device section to proceed further.

If the user is already logged-in, Device Activity screen is presented. We use following method to scan if iPhone/iPad is connected to SUSI Smart Speaker:

func fetchSSIDInfo() -> String? {
var ssid: String?
if let interfaces = CNCopySupportedInterfaces() as? [String] {
for interface in interfaces {
if let interfaceInfo = CNCopyCurrentNetworkInfo(interface as CFString) as NSDictionary? {
ssid = interfaceInfo[kCNNetworkInfoKeySSID as String] as? String
break
}
}
}
return ssid
}

Apple’s SystemConfiguration API is used to get current Wi-Fi SSID. SystemConfiguration Allow applications to access a device’s network configuration settings. Determine the reachability of the device, such as whether Wi-Fi or cell connectivity is active.

import SystemConfiguration.CaptiveNetwork

The method above return the SSID of your device current Wi-Fi. SSID is simply the technical term for a network name. When you set up a wireless home network, you give it a name to distinguish it from other networks in your neighborhood. You’ll see this name when you connect your device to your wireless network.

If current Wi-Fi match with SUSI Smart Speaker hotspot, we display device in TableView, if not we display “No device connected yet”.

if let speakerSSID = fetchSSIDInfo(), speakerSSID == "susi.ai" {
cell.accessoryType = .disclosureIndicator
cell.textLabel?.text = speakerSSID
} else {
cell.accessoryType = .none
cell.textLabel?.text = "No device connected yet"
}

SUSI Smart Speaker is coming with very exciting features. Stay tuned.

Resources –

  1. SUSI iOS Link: https://github.com/fossasia/susi_iOS
  2. Apple’s SystemConfiguration Framework Documentation
  3. Bell’s article on What Do SSID and WPA2 mean
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