Burst Camera Mode in Phimpme Android

Camera is an integral part of core feature in Phimpme Android. Various features were added in the camera part such as resolution, timer, shutter sound, white balance etc. Click burst shot from camera is also an important feature to be added. Burst shot is clicking multiple pictures in one go.

Adding a Burst mode in Phimpme Camera

  • Adding burst mode enable entry in options

The popup view in Camera is added programmatically in app. Setting up the values from sharedpreferences. It takes the value and set burst mode off, 1x, 2x etc. according to value.

final String[] burst_mode_values = getResources().getStringArray(R.array.preference_burst_mode_values);
  String[] burst_mode_entries = getResources().getStringArray(R.array.preference_burst_mode_entries);
String burst_mode_value = sharedPreferences.getString(PreferenceKeys.getBurstModePreferenceKey(), "1");

Two methods created for setting up the previous and next values. To set up the previous value we need to check the current value to be not equal to -1 and greater that zero. Upgrade or downgrade the value of burst mode, according to the click.

public int onClickPrev() {
         if( burst_mode_index != -1 && burst_mode_index > 0 ) {
            burst_mode_index--;
            update(); ...
}

public int onClickNext() {
            if( burst_mode_index != -1 && burst_mode_index < burst_mode_values.length-1 ) {
              burst_mode_index++;
            update();...
}
  • Saving the value in sharedpreferences

So on clicking the previous and next, the value of burst mode value will be updated. As shown in the above code snippet, after every increment and decrement the values set on view and called update method to update the value in the sharedpreference as shown below.

private void update() {
        String new_burst_mode_value = burst_mode_values[burst_mode_index];
        SharedPreferences sharedPreferences = PreferenceManager.getDefaultSharedPreferences(main_activity);
SharedPreferences.Editor editor = sharedPreferences.edit();
editor.putString(PreferenceKeys.getBurstModePreferenceKey(), new_burst_mode_value);
editor.apply();}

  • Taking multiple Images

Now in the implementation part, we need to continuously click the image according to the burst value set by the user. So to enable this, first check the value not to be negative and should be greater than zero. Whole iteration work on separate variable named remaining burst photos. The value of the variable decrease after every image click i.e. takePhoto method calls.

if( remaining_burst_photos == -1 || remaining_burst_photos > 0 ) {
  if( remaining_burst_photos > 0 )
     remaining_burst_photos--;
  long timer_delay = applicationInterface.getRepeatIntervalPref();
  if( timer_delay == 0 ) {
     phase = PHASE_TAKING_PHOTO;
     takePhoto(true);
  }
  else {
     takePictureOnTimer(timer_delay, true);
  }
}

Resources:

 

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Full-Screen Speech Input Implementation in SUSI Android App

SUSI Android has some very good features and one of them is, it can take input in speech format from user i.e if the user says anything then it can detect it and convert it to text. This feature is implemented in SUSI Android app using Android’s built-in speech-to-text functionality. You can implement Android’s built-in speech-to-text functionality using either only RecognizerIntent class or SpeechRecognizerIntent class, RecognitionListner interface and RecognizerIntent class. Using former method has some disadvantages:

  • During speech input, it shows a dialog box (as shown here) and it breaks the connection between user and app.
  • We can’t show partial result i.e text to the user but using the later method we can show it.

We used  SpeechRecognizerIntent class, RecognitionListner interface and RecognizerIntent class to implement Android’s built-in speech-to-text functionality in SUSI Android and you know the reason for that. In this blog post, I will show you how I implemented this feature in SUSI Android with new UI.

Layout design

You can give speech input to SUSI Android either by clicking mic button

or using ‘Hi SUSI’ hotword. When you click on mic button or use ‘Hi SUSI’ hotword, you can see a screen where you will give speech input.

Two important part of this layout are:

<TextView

  android:id=“@+id/txtchat”

  android:layout_width=“wrap_content”

  android:layout_height=“wrap_content”

  

 />

  • TextView: It used to show the partial result of speech input i.e it will show converted text (partial) of your speech.
<org.fossasia.susi.ai.speechinputanimation.SpeechProgressView

  android:id=“@+id/speechprogress”

  android:layout_width=“match_parent”

  android:layout_height=“50dp”

  android:layout_margin=“8dp”

  android:layout_gravity=“center”/>

  • SpeechProgressView: It is a custom view which use to show the animation when the user gives speech input. When the user starts speaking, the animation starts. This custom view contains five bars and these five bars animate according to user input.

Full-screen speech input implementation

When the user clicks on mic button or uses ‘Hi SUSI’ hotword, a screen comes where the user can give speech input. As already mentioned I used SpeechRecognizerIntent class, RecognitionListner interface and RecognizerIntent class to implement speech-to-text functionality in SUSI Android. RecognizerIntent class starts an intent and asks for speech input

val intent = Intent(RecognizerIntent.ACTION_RECOGNIZE_SPEECH)

intent.putExtra(RecognizerIntent.EXTRA_LANGUAGE_MODEL,

    RecognizerIntent.LANGUAGE_MODEL_FREE_FORM)

intent.putExtra(RecognizerIntent.EXTRA_CALLING_PACKAGE, “com.domain.app”)

intent.putExtra(RecognizerIntent.EXTRA_PARTIAL_RESULTS, true)

and send it through the speech recognizer. It does it through ACTION_RECOGNIZE_SPEECH. SpeechRecognizer class provides access to the speech recognition service. This service allows access to the speech recognizer and recognition related event occurs RecognitionListner receive notification from SpeechRecognizer class.

recognizer = SpeechRecognizer

      .createSpeechRecognizer(activity.applicationContext)

val listener = object : RecognitionListener {

 //implement all override methods

}

When the user starts speaking, the height of bars changes according to change in sound level. When sound level changes, onRmsChanged method get called where we are calling onRmsChanged method of SpeechProgressView class which is responsible for animating bars according to change in sound level.

override fun onRmsChanged(rmsdB: Float) {

  if (speechprogress != null)

      speechprogress.onRmsChanged(rmsdB)

}

When user finished speaking onEndOfSpeech method get called where we call onEndOfSpeech method of SpeechProgressView class which is responsible for rotating animation. Rotation is used to show that SUSI Android has finished listening and now it is processing your input.

override fun onEndOfSpeech() {

  if (speechprogress != null)

      speechprogress.onEndOfSpeech()

}

In case of any error, onError method get called and in case of successful speech input, onResults method get called. In both cases, we reset bars to their initial position and show chat activity user. The user can again give speech input either by clicking on mic or using ‘Hi SUSI’ hotword.

override fun onResults(results: Bundle) {

  if (speechprogress != null)

      speechprogress.onResultOrOnError()

  activity.supportFragmentManager.popBackStackImmediate()

}

Reference

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Making GUI for SUSI Linux with PyGTK

SUSI Linux app provides access to SUSI on Linux distributions on desktop as well as hardware devices like Raspberry Pi. It started off as a headless client but we decided to add a minimalist GUI to SUSI Linux for performing login and configuring settings. Since, SUSI Linux is a Python App, it was desirable to use a GUI Framework compatible with Python. Many popular GUI frameworks now provide bindings for Python. Some popular available choices are:

wxPython: wxPython is a Python GUI framework based on wxWidgets, a cross-platform GUI library written in C++. In addition to the standard dialogs, it includes a 2D path drawing API, dockable windows, support for many file formats and both text-editing and word-processing widgets. wxPython though mainly support Python 2 as programming language.

PyQT: Qt is a multi-licensed cross-platform framework written in C++. Qt needs a commercial licence for use but if application is completely Open Source, community license can be used. Qt is an excellent choice for GUIs and many applications are based on it.

PyGTK / PyGObject: PyGObject is a Python module that lets you write GUI applications in GTK+. It provides bindings to GObject, a cross platform C library. GTK+ applications are natively supported in most distros and you do not need to install any other development tools for developing with PyGTK.

Comparing all these frameworks, PyGTK was found to meet our needs very well. To make UIs in PyGTK, you have a WYSIWYG (What you see is what you get) editor called Glade. Though you can design whole UI programmatically, it is always convenient to use an editor like Glade to simplify the creation and styling of widgets.

To create a UI, you need to install Glade in your specific distribution. After that open glade, and add a Top Level container Window or AppWindow to your app.

Once that is done, you may pick from the available Layout Managers. We are using BoxLayout Manager in SUSI Linux GUIs. Once that is done, add your widgets to the Application Window using Drag and Drop.

Properties of widgets are available on the right panel. Edit your widget properties to give them meaningful IDs so we can address them later in our code. GTK also provides Signals for signaling about a events associated with the widgets. Open the Signals tab in the Widget properties pane. Then, you need to write name of the signal handler for the events associated with Widgets. A signal handler is a function that is fired upon the occurrence of the associated event. For example, we have signals like text_changed in Text Entry boxes, and clicked for Button.

After completing the design of GUI, we can address the .glade file of the UI we just created in the Python code. We can do this using the following snippet.

import gi
gi.require_version('Gtk', '3.0')
from gi.repository import Gtk

builder = Gtk.Builder()
builder.add_from_file("glade_files/signin.glade")

You can reference each widget from the Glade file using its ID like below.

email_field = builder.get_object("email_field")

Now, to handle all the declared signals in the Glade file, we need to make a Handler class. In this class, you need to define call the valid callbacks for your signals. On the occurrence of the signal, respective callback is fired.

class Handler:

   def onDeleteWindow(self, *args):
       Gtk.main_quit(*args)

   def signInButtonClicked(self, *args):
       # implementation

   def input_changed(self, *args):
       # implementation

We may associate a handler function to more than one Signal. For that, we just need to specify the respective function in both the Signals.

Now, we need to connect this Handler to builder signals. This can be done using the following line.

builder.connect_signals(Handler())

Now, we can show our window using the following lines.

window.show_all()
Gtk.main()

The above lines displays the window and start the Gtk main loop. The script waits on the Gtk main loop. The app may be quitted using the Gtk.main_quit() call. Running this script shows the Login Screen of our app like below.

Resources:

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Modifying SUSI Skills using SUSI Skill CMS

SUSI Skill CMS is a complete solution right from creating a skill to modifying the skill. The skills in SUSI are well synced with the remote repository and can be completely modified using the Edit Skill feature of SUSI Skill CMS. Here’s how to Modify a Skill.

  1. Sign Up/Login to the website using your credentials in skills.susi.ai
  2. Choose the SKill which you want to edit and click on the pencil icon.
  3. The following screen allows editing the skill. One can change the Group, Language, Skill Name, Image and the content as well.
  4. After making the changes the commit message can be added to Save the changes.

To achieve the above steps we require the following API Endpoints of the SUSI Server.

  1. http://api.susi.ai/cms/getSkillMetadata.json – This gives us the meta data which populates the various Skill Content, Image, Author etc.
  2. http://api.susi.ai/cms/getAllLanguages.json – This gives us all the languages of a Skill Group.
  3. http://api.susi.ai/cms/getGroups.json – This gives us all the list of Skill Groups whether Knowledge, Entertainment, Smalltalk etc.

Now since we have all the APIs in place we make the following AJAX calls to update the Skill Process.

  1. Since we are detecting changes in all the fields (Group Value, Skill Name, Language Value, Image Value, Commit Message, Content changes and the format of the content), the AJAX call can only be sent when there is a change in the PR and there is no null or undefined value in them. For that, we make various form validations. They are as follows.
    1. We first detect whether the User is in a logged in state.
if (!cookies.get('loggedIn')) {
            notification.open({
                message: 'Not logged In',
                description: 'Please login and then try to create/edit a skill',
                icon: <Icon type="close-circle" style={{ color: '#f44336' }} />,
            });
        }
  1. We check whether the image uploaded matches the format of the Skill image to be stored which is ::image images/imageName.png
if (!new RegExp(/images\/\w+\.\w+/g).test(this.state.imageUrl)) {
            notification.open({
                message: 'Error Processing your Request',
                description: 'image must be in format of images/imageName.jpg',
                icon: <Icon type="close-circle" style={{ color: '#f44336' }} />,
            });
        }
  1. We check if the commit message is not null and notify the user if he forgot to add a message.
if (this.state.commitMessage === null) {
            notification.open({
                message: 'Please make some changes to save the Skill',
                icon: <Icon type="close-circle" style={{ color: '#f44336' }} />,
            });
        }
  1. We also check whether the old values of the skill are completely similar to the new ones, in this case, we do not send the request.
if (toldValues===newValues {
            notification.open({
                message: 'Please make some changes to save the Skill',
                icon: <Icon type="close-circle" style={{ color: '#f44336' }} />,
            });
        }

To check out the complete code, go to this link.

  1. Next, if the above validations are successful, we send a POST request to the server and show the notification to the user accordingly, whether the changes to the Skill Data have been updated or not. Here’s the AJAX call snippet.
// create a form object
let form = new FormData();       
/* Append the following fields from the Skill Component:- OldModel, OldLanguage, OldSkill, NewModel, NewGroup, NewLanguage, NewSkill, changelog, content, imageChanged, old_image_name, new_image_name, image_name_changed, access_token */  
if (image_name_changed) {
            file = this.state.file;
            // append file to image
        }

        let settings = {
            "async": true,
            "crossDomain": true,
            "url": "http://api.susi.ai/cms/modifySkill.json",
            "method": "POST",
            "processData": false,
            "contentType": false,
            "mimeType": "multipart/form-data",
            "data": form
        };
        $.ajax(settings)..done(function (response) {
         //show success
        }.
        .fail(function(response){
         // show failure
        }
  1. To verify all this we head to the commits section of the SUSI Skill Data repo and see the changes we made. The changes can be seen here https://github.com/fossasia/susi_skill_data/commits/master 

Resources

  1. AJAX POST Request – https://api.jquery.com/jquery.post/ 
  2. Material UI – http://material-ui.com 
  3. Notifications – http://www.material-ui.com/#/components/notification 
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Creating A Better Responsive Design In Susper

A lot of work has been done on making Susper, a wonderful search-engine and still more work have to be done on it. To become a good competitor in the market, one should make their website UI design such that:

  • It should be eye-catching for the users on the first-time visit to the website.
  • It should be easy to use with simple UI features rather than having more complex UI features.

We have been more oriented towards the material design. We have used Bootstrap technology for designing UI. Earlier, we proposed an idea of creating a UI using Angular Material v2 but it was dropped due to time limitations and other issue priorities.

To make Susper a better competitor in the market, we made sure it should be responsive as well on the following devices:

  • Mobile screen devices:
    • 320px – Smaller screen size.
    • 375px – Medium screen size.
    • 425px – Larger screen size.
  • Tablets:
    • 768px – default screen size for tablets.
  • Laptops:
    • 1024px – Smaller screen size.
    • 1440px – Larger screen size.
  • 4K:
    • 2560px – Default screen size.

We targeted these devices using @media queries in CSS3. For e.g. if I want to make a site responsive for the mobile devices, I will be using:

@media screen and (minwidth: 320px) and (maxwidth: 425px) {
  // do something
}

 

Here, min-width: 320px means that the screen size should be greater than and equal to 320px and max-width: 425px means that the screen size should be less than and equal to 425px.

It is not necessary to use only these dimensions. Suppose if there is break in UI design between 320px and 425px then, one can add that screen size using @media query. In this case, nested @media queries play a quite good role.

@media screen and (minwidth: 320px) and (maxwidth: 425px) {
  // do something
  // let’s say, break in UI design is observed at 375px
  // add nested @media query
  @media screen and (minwidth: 375px) {
    // do something
  }
}

 

We’re still improving our CSS code at present following this grid pattern. One can check UI code at Susper repository hosted on GitHub: https://github.com/fossasia/susper.com

We have also used a lot of breakpoints which are not nested. But it’s good practice to break points in nested form. This will be solved while improving our CSS code.

Here are some screenshots of the current responsiveness of Susper:

  • Mobile screen devices:
  • Tablet devices:

  • Laptops:
  • 4K display:

Resources:

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Stripe Authorization In Open Event API Server

The Open Event System supports payments through stripe. Stripe is a suite of APIs that powers commerce for businesses of all sizes. This blogpost covers testing of Stripe Authorization Schema and endpoints in the API Server.

The Stripe Authorization class provides the following endpoints:

'/stripe-authorization'
'/stripe-authorization/<int:id>'
'/events/<int:event_id>/stripe-authorization'
'/events/<event_identifier>/stripe-authorization'


In the pull request made for adding documentation and tests, these two endpoints were removed:

'stripe_authorization_list',
'/events/<int:event_id>/stripe-authorization',
'/events/<event_identifier>/stripe-authorization'

This is because each event can have only one stripe authorization, so there can not exist a list of stripe authorization objects related to an event.

The ‘stripe_authorization_list’ endpoint is made POST only. This is because Open Event does not allow individual resources’ list to be accessible. Since, there is no endpoint which returns a list of Stripe Authorizations the StripeAuthorizationList(ResourceListis removed.

The ResourceDetail class was modified to add a query to support  results from ‘/events/<int:event_id>/stripe-authorization’ endpoint suThe view_kwargs for the detail endpoint has to contain the resource id, so event_id from view_kwags is used to get the id for stripe authorization.

stripe_authorization = self.session.query(StripeAuthorization).filter_by(event_id=view_kwargs['event_id']).one()
view_kwargs['id'] = stripe_authorization.id

Writing Test for Documentation

(Tests for the /events/1/stripe-authorization  is described here, for others please refer to links in additional references.)

To test the  /events/1/stripe-authorization endpoint for GET, we first insert a Stripe Authorization object into the database which will then be retrieved by the GET request and then compared with the expected response body from the documentation file.

Since stripe-auth has a required relationship with event class, an event must also exist for strie auth object to be created. The event is also required because the endpoint ‘events/’ expects an event object to exist. The StripeAuthorizationFactory takes care of this with event as a RelatedFactory. So when a StripeAuthorization object is inserted, an event is created first and passed as the required relationship to stripe_list_post endpoint.

The event is related to the stripe object by setting event_id = 1 in the factory.

Adding the pre-test hook for GET:

@hooks.before("StripeAuthorization > Stripe Authorization for an Event > Get Stripe Authorization Details of an Event")
def event_stripe_authorization_get_detail(transaction):
   """
   GET /events/1/stripe-authorization
   :param transaction:
   :return:
   """
   with stash['app'].app_context():
       stripe = StripeAuthorizationFactory()
       db.session.add(stripe)
       db.session.commit()


The expected response for this request can be found
 here.

Additional References:

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Uploaded Images History in Phimpme Android

In Phimpme Android one core feature is of sharing images to many different platforms. After sharing we usually wants to look in the our past records, where we uploaded what pictures? Which image we uploaded? What time it was? So I added a feature to view the upload history of images. User can go to the Upload history tab, present in the navigation drawer of the app. From there he can browse the repository.

How I added history feature in Phimpme

  • Store the data when User initiate an upload

To get which data uploading is in progress. I am storing its name, date, time and image path. When user approve to upload image from Sharing Activity.

Created a database model

public class UploadHistoryRealmModel extends RealmObject{

   String name;
   String pathname;
   String datetime;

   public String getName() {
       return name;
   }

   public void setName(String name) {
       this.name = name;
   }

   public String getPathname() {
       return pathname;
   }

   public void setPathname(String pathname) {
       this.pathname = pathname;
   }

   public String getDatetime() {
       return datetime;
   }

   public void setDatetime(String datetime) {
       this.datetime = datetime;
   }
} 

This is the realm model for storing the name, date, time and image path.

Saving in database

UploadHistoryRealmModel uploadHistory;
uploadHistory = realm.createObject(UploadHistoryRealmModel.class);
uploadHistory.setName(sharableAccountsList.get(position).toString());
uploadHistory.setPathname(saveFilePath);
uploadHistory.setDatetime(new SimpleDateFormat("dd/MM/yyyy HH:mm:ss").format(new Date()));
realm.commitTransaction();

Creating realm object and setting the details in begin and commit Transaction block

  • Added upload history entry in Navigation Drawer

    <LinearLayout
       xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
       android:id="@+id/ll_drawer_uploadhistory"
       android:layout_width="match_parent"
       android:layout_height="wrap_content"
       android:background="@drawable/ripple"
       android:clickable="true"
       android:orientation="horizontal">
    
       <com.mikepenz.iconics.view.IconicsImageView
           android:id="@+id/Drawer_Upload_Icon"
           android:layout_width="@dimen/icon_width_height"
           android:layout_height="@dimen/icon_width_height"
           app:iiv_icon="gmd-file-upload"/>
    
       <TextView
           android:id="@+id/Drawer_Upload_Item"
           android:layout_width="wrap_content"
           android:layout_height="wrap_content"
           android:text="@string/upload_history"
           android:textColor="@color/md_dark_background"
           android:textSize="16sp"/>
    </LinearLayout>

It consist of an ImageView and TextView in a horizontal oriented Linear Layout

  • Showing history in Upload History Activity

Added recyclerview in layout.

<android.support.v7.widget.RecyclerView
   android:id="@+id/upload_history_recycler_view"
   android:layout_width="match_parent"
   android:layout_height="match_parent"
   android:layout_below="@id/toolbar">
</android.support.v7.widget.RecyclerView>

Query the database and updated the adapter of Upload History

uploadResults = realm.where(UploadHistoryRealmModel.class);
RecyclerView.LayoutManager layoutManager = new LinearLayoutManager(this);
uploadHistoryRecyclerView.setLayoutManager(layoutManager);
uploadHistoryRecyclerView.setAdapter(uploadHistoryAdapter);

Added the adapter for recycler view and created an Item using Constraint layout.

Resources

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Creation of Icon Pack for Meilix

An icon theme is a set of icons that have common looks and feel. The user can select the icon theme that they want to use, and all apps use icons from the theme if a particular icon is not available in theme the fallback theme is used .

An icons theme is only a mapping. Given an arrangement of indexes to search for icons in and a theme name it maps from icon name and icon size to an icon filename.

Icon in Meilix are stored in /usr/share/icons/meilix.

We need to create a index.theme file which tells the LXQT desktop where the icons for a particular application or mime type are located

[Icon Theme]
Name=Meilix
DisplayDepth=32
DesktopDefault=48
DesktopSizes=16,22,32,48,64,128,256
ToolbarDefault=22
ToolbarSizes=16,22,32,48
MainToolbarDefault=22
MainToolbarSizes=16,22,32,48
SmallDefault=16
SmallSizes=16,22,32,48
PanelDefault=32
PanelSizes=16,22,32,48,64,128,256
DialogDefault=32
DialogSizes=16,22,32,48,64,128,256

#################################
#   Fallback icon theme to use  #
#################################
Inherits=oxygen

 

After defining the icon theme name and sizes we next define the fallback icon theme to use icons from in case of missing icons so we have chosen Oxygen icon theme which is very similar to Meilix icon theme to have a consistent looks and feel.

We further define the different types of icons with their locations , resolution and type.

Meilix icon theme use four different sizes 16 , 22 , 24 ,32 ,64 and two types scalable for svg icons and fixed for png icons.

[actions/32]
Size=32
Context=Actions
Type=Fixed

[actions/48]
Size=48
Context=Actions
Type=Fixed

#  Apps

[apps/16]
Size=16
Context=Applications
Type=Fixed

[apps/22]
Size=22
Context=Applications
Type=Fixed

 

Meilix Icon pack directory structure

Adding more icons to theme

To append a custom icon to Meilix icon theme xdg-icon-resource can be used. This will resize and copy the icon to /share/icons/meilix. With this method, custom emblems can also be added. Examples:

$ xdg-icon-resource install --size 64 --context --theme meilix emblems meilix-example.png --mode system # add as emblem
$ xdg-icon-resource install --size 64 --theme meilix meilix-example.png --mode system # add as normal icon

Mime type icons

file managers get definitions from /usr/share/mime/ . Calling an icon according to the definition found there and copying it to /share/icons/meilix will cause the file manager to display the custom mime type icon.

Creating a custom icon for text files (*.txt)

# grep txt /usr/share/mime/globs | egrep -o '.+\/[^:]+' | tr '/' '-'
application-x-kate ;# rename your icon according to this output
xdg-icon-resource install --size 64 --context mimetypes --theme meilix application-x-kate.png --mode system

Resources

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Implementation of Child Routes in SUSI Skill CMS

In a previous blog post I discussed about how we implemented routing in SUSI Web Chat Application. In this post I’m planning to discuss about how we developed child routes in SUSI Skill CMS .

When we start developing our application, it was working correctly but  all skills loaded in the same URL. ( skill.susi.ai/SkillPage ). When user clicks the edit button every skill loaded in the same URL ( skill.susi.ai/EditSkill ). We got a requirement to load each of our skills in separate routes. This is how we implemented the child routes of the application.

We wanted to show each individual skill under this type of URL,

skill.susi.ai/ [SKILL GROUP] / [SKILL NAME] / [LANGUAGE]

When user clicks on the edit button, we needed to show that particular skill under this URL.

skill.susi.ai/ [SKILL GROUP] / [SKILL NAME] / edit / [LANGUAGE]

First we set our routings in index.js file.

<Switch>
    <Route exact path="/:category/:skill/edit/:lang" component={Home} />
    <Route exact path="/:category/:skill/:lang" component={SkillListing}/>
    <Route exact path="/" component={BrowseSkill} />
    <Route exact path="*" component={NotFound} />
</Switch>

We have to add the “exact” attribute, if we don’t add that it will not redirect users to “404” page when user trying to access wrong routes.

Next step is sending data from one component to another component.
In SUSI Skill CMS, user can choose any skill from the home page. Then after it goes to the skill page and shows details about the selected skill. We have to modify the button as,

<Link to={{ pathname: '/'+self.state.groupValue+'/'+el+'/'+self.state.languageValue }} >
<Card>
</Card>
</Link>

Now the user clicks on the card. It changes the URL and loads the corresponding component according to the routes that we defined in “index.js” file previously.
Second thing that we need to do is to catch URL routs and render relevant data according to the URL routes.
Let’s say I clicked on “distance” skill. Then user will go to this URL “http://skills.susi.ai/Knowledge/distance/en ”
Now It loads the “SkillListing” component according to the route we defined in “ index.js ” here ””.
To derive data from URL we simply used these codes in “SkillListing.js”.

let baseUrl = 'http://api.susi.ai/cms/getSkillMetadata.json';           
let modelValue = "general";
           this.name = this.props.location.pathname.split('/')[2];
           this.groupValue = this.props.location.pathname.split('/')[1];
           this.languageValue = this.props.location.pathname.split('/')[3];
           url = baseUrl + '?model=' + modelValue + '&group=' + this.groupValue + '&language=' + this.languageValue + '&skill=' + this.name;

We collected data from the URL and made another URL, we used this URL to get details of the skill from the server. We used this urls as below.

           $.ajax({
               url: url,
               jsonpCallback: 'pc',
               dataType: 'jsonp',
               jsonp: 'callback',
               crossDomain: true,
               success: function (data) {
                   self.updateData(data.skill_metadata)
               }
           });

If the Ajax request is success, those data are passed to “updateData()” and it updates the component and shows to users like this.

We applied same mechanism to the edit button and edit page. This is how we modified skill.susi.ai ‘s Routings. If you like to contribute SUSI Skill CMS please fork our repository on github. here

Resources:

  • Previous Blogpost about routing: https://blog.fossasia.org/implementation-of-react-routers-in-susi-web-chat/
  • React Router v4 tutorial https://medium.com/@pshrmn/a-simple-react-router-v4-tutorial-7f23ff27adf
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