Youtube videos in the SUSI iOS Client

The iOS and android client already have the functionality to play videos based on the queries. In order to implement this feature of playing videos in the iOS client, we use the Youtube Data API v3. The task here was to create an UI/UX for the playing of videos within the app. An API call is made initially to fetch the youtube videos based on the query and they video ID of the first object is extracted and used to play the video.

The API endpoint for youtube data API looks like:

https://www.googleapis.com/youtube/v3/search?part=snippet&q={query}&key={your_api_key}

Using this we get the following result: ( I am adding only the first item which is required since the response is too long )

Path: $.items[0]

{

 "kind": "youtube#searchResult",

 "etag": "\"m2yskBQFythfE4irbTIeOgYYfBU/oR-eA572vNoma1XIhrbsFTotfTY\"",

 "id": {

"kind": "youtube#channel",

"channelId": "UCQprMsG-raCIMlBudm20iLQ"

 },

 "snippet": {

"publishedAt": "2015-01-01T11:06:00.000Z",

"channelId": "UCQprMsG-raCIMlBudm20iLQ",

"title": "FOSSASIA",

"description": "FOSSASIA is supporting the development of Free and Open Source technologies for social change in Asia. The annual FOSSASIA Summit brings together ...",

"thumbnails": {

"default": {

"url": "https://yt3.ggpht.com/-CP18cWbo34A/AAAAAAAAAAI/AAAAAAAAAAA/kEmIgO8OjCk/s88-c-k-no-mo-rj-c0xffffff/photo.jpg"

},

"medium": {

"url": "https://yt3.ggpht.com/-CP18cWbo34A/AAAAAAAAAAI/AAAAAAAAAAA/kEmIgO8OjCk/s240-c-k-no-mo-rj-c0xffffff/photo.jpg"

},

"high": {

"url": "https://yt3.ggpht.com/-CP18cWbo34A/AAAAAAAAAAI/AAAAAAAAAAA/kEmIgO8OjCk/s240-c-k-no-mo-rj-c0xffffff/photo.jpg"

}

},

"channelTitle": "FOSSASIA",

"liveBroadcastContent": "upcoming"

 }

}

We parse the above object to grab the videoID, based on the query,  we will use code below:

if let itemsObject = response[Client.YoutubeResponseKeys.Items] as? [[String : AnyObject]] {
    if let items = itemsObject[0][Client.YoutubeResponseKeys.ID] as? [String : AnyObject] {
         let videoID = items[Client.YoutubeResponseKeys.VideoID] as? String
         completion(videoID, true, nil)
    }
}

This videoID is returned to the Controller where this method was called.

Now, we begin with designing the UI for the same. First of all, we need a view on which the youtube video will be played and this view would help dismiss the video by clicking on it.

First, we add the blackView to the entire screen.

// declaration
let blackView = UIView()

// Add backgroundView
func addBackgroundView() {

   If let window = UIApplication.shared.keyWindow {

           self.view.addSubview(blackView) 

           // Cover the entire screen
           blackView.frame = window.frame

           blackView.backgroundColor = UIColor(white: 0, alpha: 0.5)
           blackView.addGestureRecognizer(UITapGestureRecognizer(target: self, action: #selector(handleDismiss)))

   }

}

func handleDismiss() {
   UIView.animate(withDuration: 0.5, delay: 0, usingSpringWithDamping: 1, initialSpringVelocity: 1, options: .curveEaseOut, animations: {
       self.blackView.removeFromSuperview()
   }, completion: nil)
}

Next, we add the YoutubePlayerView. For this we use the Pod `YoutubePlayer`. Since, it had a few warnings showing as well as some videos not being played I had to make fixes to the original pod and use my own customized version ( available here ).

// Youtube Player
lazy var youtubePlayer: YouTubePlayerView = {
    let frame = CGRect(x: 0, y: 0, width: self.view.frame.width - 16, height: self.view.frame.height * 1 / 3)
    let player = YouTubePlayerView(frame: frame)
    return player
}()

// Shows Youtube Player

func addYotubePlayer(_ videoID: String) {
    if let window = UIApplication.shared.keyWindow {

       // Add YoutubePlayer view on top of blackView
        self.blackView.addSubview(self.youtubePlayer)
        // Calculate and set frame

       let centerX = UIScreen.main.bounds.size.width / 2
        let centerY = UIScreen.main.bounds.size.height / 3
        self.youtubePlayer.center = CGPoint(x: centerX, y: centerY)

       // Load Player using the Video ID 
        self.youtubePlayer.loadVideoID(videoID)

        blackView.alpha = 0
        youtubePlayer.alpha = 0

        UIView.animate(withDuration: 0.5, delay: 0, usingSpringWithDamping: 1, initialSpringVelocity: 1, options: .curveEaseOut, animations: {
            self.blackView.alpha = 1
            self.youtubePlayer.alpha = 1
       }, completion: nil)
    }
}

We are set with the UI and the only thing we are left with is to actually call the API in the client and after getting the `videoID` from that we call the above method passing this `videoID`. Before calling we need to check whether our query contains the play action or not and if it does we make the API call and add the player.

if let text = inputTextField.text {
    if text.contains("play") || text.contains("Play") {
        let query = text.replacingOccurrences(of: "play", with: "").replacingOccurrences(of: "Play", with: "")
        Client.sharedInstance.searchYotubeVideos(query) { (videoID, _, _) in
            DispatchQueue.main.async {
                if let videoID = videoID {
                    self.addYotubePlayer(videoID)
                 }
             }
          }
    }

}

We are all set now!Below is the output for the Youtube Player:

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Websearch and Link Preview support in SUSI iOS

The SUSI.AI server responds to API calls with answers to the queries made. These answers might contain an action, for example a web search, where the client needs to make a web search request to fetch different web pages based on the query. Thus, we need to add a link preview in the iOS Client for each such page extracting and displaying the title, description and a main image of the webpage.

At first we make the API call adding the query to the query parameter and get the result from it.

API Call:

http://api.susi.ai/susi/chat.json?timezoneOffset=-330&q=amazon

And get the following result:

{

"query": "amazon",

"count": 1,

"client_id": "aG9zdF8xMDguMTYyLjI0Ni43OQ==",

"query_date": "2017-06-02T14:34:15.675Z",

"answers": [

{

"data": [{

"0": "amazon",

"1": "amazon",

"timezoneOffset": "-330"

}],

"metadata": {

"count": 1

},

"actions": [{

"type": "answer",

"expression": "I don't know how to answer this. Here is a web search result:"

},

{

"type": "websearch",

"query": "amazon"

}]

}],

"answer_date": "2017-06-02T14:34:15.773Z",

"answer_time": 98,

"language": "en",

"session": {

"identity": {

"type": "host",

"name": "108.162.246.79",

"anonymous": true

}

}

}

After parsing this response, we first recognise the type of action that needs to be performed, here we get `websearch` which means we need to make a web search for the query. Here, we use `DuckDuckGo’s` API to get the result.

API Call to DuckDuckGo:

http://api.duckduckgo.com/?q=amazon&format=json

I am adding just the first object of the required data since the API response is too long.

Path: $.RelatedTopics[0]

{

 "Result": "<a href=\"https://duckduckgo.com/Amazon.com\">Amazon.com</a>Amazon.com, also called Amazon, is an American electronic commerce and cloud computing company...",

 "Icon": {

"URL": "https://duckduckgo.com/i/d404ba24.png",

"Height": "",

"Width": ""

},

 "FirstURL": "https://duckduckgo.com/Amazon.com",

 "Text": "Amazon.com Amazon.com, also called Amazon, is an American electronic commerce and cloud computing company..."

}

For the link preview, we need an image logo, URL and a description for the same so, here we will use the `Icon.URL` and `Text` key. We have our own class to parse this data into an object.

class WebsearchResult: NSObject {
   
   var image: String = "no-image"
   var info: String = "No data found"
   var url: String = "https://duckduckgo.com/"
   var query: String = ""
   
   init(dictionary: [String:AnyObject]) {
       
       if let relatedTopics = dictionary[Client.WebsearchKeys.RelatedTopics] as? [[String : AnyObject]] {
           
           if let icon = relatedTopics[0][Client.WebsearchKeys.Icon] as? [String : String] {
               if let image = icon[Client.WebsearchKeys.Icon] {
                   self.image = image
               }
           }
           
           if let url = relatedTopics[0][Client.WebsearchKeys.FirstURL] as? String {
               self.url = url
           }
           
           if let info = relatedTopics[0][Client.WebsearchKeys.Text] as? String {
               self.info = info
           }
           
           if let query = dictionary[Client.WebsearchKeys.Heading] as? String {
               let string = query.lowercased().replacingOccurrences(of: " ", with: "+")
               self.query = string
           }   
       }   
   }   
}

We now have the data and only thing left is to display it in the UI.

Within the Chat Bubble, we need to add a container view which will contain the image, and the text description.

 let websearchContentView = UIView()
    
    let searchImageView: UIImageView = {
        let imageView = UIImageView(frame: CGRect(x: 0, y: 0, width: 44, height: 44))
        imageView.contentMode = .scaleAspectFit

       // Placeholder image assigned
        imageView.image = UIImage(named: "no-image")
        return imageView
    }()
    
    let websiteText: UILabel = {
        let label = UILabel()
        label.textColor = .white
        return label
    }()

   func addLinkPreview(_ frame: CGRect) {
        textBubbleView.addSubview(websearchContentView)
        websearchContentView.backgroundColor = .lightGray
        websearchContentView.frame = frame
        
        websearchContentView.addSubview(searchImageView)
        websearchContentView.addSubview(websiteText)




       // Add constraints in UI
        websearchContentView.addConstraintsWithFormat(format: "H:|-4-[v0(44)]-4-[v1]-4-|", views: searchImageView, websiteText)
        websearchContentView.addConstraintsWithFormat(format: "V:|-4-[v0]-4-|", views: searchImageView)
        websearchContentView.addConstraintsWithFormat(format: "V:|-4-[v0(44)]-4-|", views: websiteText)
    }

Next, in the Collection View, while checking other action types, we add checking for `websearch` and then call the API there followed by adding frame size and calling the `addLinkPreview` function.

else if message.responseType == Message.ResponseTypes.websearch {
  let params = [
    Client.WebsearchKeys.Query: message.query!,
    Client.WebsearchKeys.Format: "json"
  ]

  Client.sharedInstance.websearch(params, { (results, success, error) in                      
    if success {
      cell.message?.websearchData = results
      message.websearchData = results
      self.collectionView?.reloadData()
      self.scrollToLast()
    } else {
      print(error)
    }
  })
                    
  cell.messageTextView.frame = CGRect(x: 16, y: 0, width: estimatedFrame.width + 16, height: estimatedFrame.height + 30)
  

 cell.textBubbleView.frame = CGRect(x: 4, y: -4, width: estimatedFrame.width + 16 + 8 + 16, height: estimatedFrame.height + 20 + 6 + 64)
                    
  let frame = CGRect(x: 16, y: estimatedFrame.height + 20, width: estimatedFrame.width + 16 - 4, height: 60 - 8)
  

 cell.addLinkPreview(frame)

}

And set the collection View cell’s size.

else if message.responseType == Message.ResponseTypes.websearch {
  return CGSize(width: view.frame.width, height: estimatedFrame.height + 20 + 64)
}

And we are done 🙂

Here is the final version how this would look like on the device:

 

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Setup Lint Testing in SUSI Android

As developers tend to make mistakes while writing code, small mistakes or issues can cause a negative impact on the overall functionality and speed of the app. Therefore it is necessary to understand the importance of Lint testing in Android.

Android Lint is a tool present in Android studio which is effective in scanning and reporting different types of bugs present in the code, it also find typos and security issues in the app. The issue is reported along with severity level thus allowing the developer to fix it based on the priority and level of damage they can cause. It is easy to use and can significantly improve the quality of your code.

Effect of Lint testing on Speed of the Android App

Lint testing can significantly improve the speed of the app in the following ways

  1. Android Link test helps in removing the declaration redundancy in the code, thus the Gradle need not to bind the same object again and again helping to improve the speed.
  2. Lint test helps to find bugs related to Class Structure in different Activities of the Application which is necessary to avoid the case of memory leaks.
  3. Lint testing also tells the developer above the size of resources use for example the drawable resources which sometimes take up a large piece of memory in the application. Cleaning these resources or replacing them with lightweight drawables helps in increasing the speed of the app.
  4. Overall Lint Testing helps in removing Typos, unused import statement, redundant strings, hence refactoring the whole code and increasing stability and speed.

Setup

We can use Gradle to invoke the list test by the following commands in the root directory of the folder.

To set up we can add this code to our build.gradle file

 lintOptions {
        lintConfig file("lint.xml")
    }

The lint.xml generated will look something like this

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<lint>
   <!-- Changes the severity of these to "error" for getting to a warning-free build -->
   <issue id="UnusedResources" severity="error"/>
</lint>

To explicitly run the test on Android we can use the following commands.

On Windows

gradlew lint

On Mac

./gradlew lint

We can also use the lint testing on various variants of the app, using commands such as

gradle lintDebug 

  or 

gradle lintRelease.

The xml file generated contains the error along with their severity level .

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<lint>
   <issue id="Invalid Package" severity="ignore" />
   <!-- All below are issues that have been brought to informational (so they are visible, but don't break the build) -->
   <issue id="GradleDependency" severity="informational" />    <issue id="Old TargetApi" severity="informational" />
</lint>

Testing on Susi Android:-

After testing the result on Susi Android we find the following errors.

As we can see that there are two errors and a lot of warnings. Though warning are not that severe but we can definitely improve on this. Thus making a habit of testing your code with lint test will improve the performance of your app and will make it more faster.

The test provides a complete and detailed list of issues present in the project.

We can find the exact location as well as the cause of the error by going deeper into the directory like this.

We can see there is a error in build.gradle file which is due to different versions of libraries present in the gradle files as of com.android.support libraries must be of same version.

In this way we can test out code and find errors in it.

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Map Support for SUSI Webchat

SUSI chat client supports map tiles now for queries related to location. SUSI responds with an interactive internal map tile with the location pointed by a marker. It also provides you with a link to open street maps where you can get the whole view of the location using the zooming options provided and also gives the population count for that location.

Lets visit SUSI WebChat and try it out.

Query : Where is london
Response :

Implementation:

How do we know that a map tile is to be rendered?
The actions in the API response tell the client what to render. The client loops through the actions array and renders the response for each action accordingly.

"actions": [
  {
    "type": "answer",
    "expression": "City of London is a place with a population of 7556900.             Here is a map: https://www.openstreetmap.org/#map=13/51.51279067225417/-0.09184009399817228"
  },
  {
    "type": "anchor",
    "link":    "https://www.openstreetmap.org/#map=13/51.51279067225417/-0.09184009399817228",
    "text": "Link to Openstreetmap: City of London"
  },
  {
    "type": "map",
    "latitude": "51.51279067225417",
    "longitude": "-0.09184009399817228",
    "zoom": "13"
  }
]

Note: The API response has been trimmed to show only the relevant content.

The first action element is of type answer so the client renders the text response, ‘City of London is a place with a population of 7556900. Here is a map: https://www.openstreetmap.org/#map=13/51.51279067225417/-0.09184009399817228

The second action element is of type anchor with the text to display and the link to hyperlink specified by the text and link attributes, so the client renders the text `Link to Openstreetmap: City of London`, hyperlinked to “https://www.openstreetmap.org/#map=13/51.51279067225417/-0.09184009399817228”.

Finally, the third action element is of type map. Latitude, Longitude and zoom level information are also  specified using latitude, longitude and zoom attributes. The client renders a map using these attributes.

I used react-leafletmodule to render the interactive map tiles.

To integrate it into our project and set the required style for the map tiles, we need to load Leaflet’s CSS style sheet and we also need to include height and width for the map component. 

<link rel="stylesheet"  href="http://cdn.leafletjs.com/leaflet/v0.7.7/leaflet.css" />
.leaflet-container {
  height: 150px;
  width: 80%;
  margin: 0 auto;
}
case 'map': {

  let lat = parseFloat(data.answers[0].actions[index].latitude);
  let lng = parseFloat(data.answers[0].actions[index].longitude);
  let zoom = parseFloat(data.answers[0].actions[index].zoom);
  let mymap = drawMap(lat,lng,zoom);

  listItems.push(
    <li className='message-list-item' key={action+index}>
      <section className={messageContainerClasses}>
        {mymap}
        <p className='message-time'>
          {message.date.toLocaleTimeString()}
        </p>;
      </section>
    </li>
  );

  break;
}
import { divIcon } from 'leaflet';
import { Map, Marker, Popup, TileLayer } from 'react-leaflet';


// Draw a Map

function drawMap(lat,lng,zoom){

  let position = [lat, lng];

  const icon = divIcon({
    className: 'map-marker-icon',
    iconSize: [35, 35]
    });

  const map = (
    <Map center={position} zoom={zoom}>
      <TileLayer
      attribution=''
      url='http://{s}.tile.osm.org/{z}/{x}/{y}.png'
      />
      <ExtendedMarker position={position} icon={icon}>
        <Popup>
          <span><strong>Hello!</strong> <br/> I am here.</span>
        </Popup>
      </ExtendedMarker>
    </Map>
  );

return map;

}

Here, I used a custom marker icon because the default icon provided by leaflet had an issue and was not being rendered. I used divIcon from leaflet to create a custom map marker icon.

When the map tile is rendered, we see a Popup message at the marker. The extended marker class is used to keep the Popup open initially.

class ExtendedMarker extends Marker {
  componentDidMount() {
    super.componentDidMount();
    this.leafletElement.openPopup();
  }
}


The function drawMap returns a Map tile component which is rendered and we have our interactive map!

Resources
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Hyperlinking Support for SUSI Webchat

SUSI responses can contain links or email ids. Whenever we want to access those links or send a mail to those email ids, it is very inconvenient for the user to manually copy the link and check out the contents, which is a very bad UX.

I used a module called ‘react-linkify’ to address this issue.
React-linkify’ is a React component to parse links (urls, emails, etc.) in text into clickable links.

Usage:

<Linkify>{text to linkify}</Linkify>

Any link that appears inside the linkify component will be hyperlinked and is made clickable. It uses regular expressions and pattern matching to detect URLs and mail ids and are made clickable such that clicking on URLs opens the link in a new window and clicking a mail id opens “mailto:” .

Code:

export const parseAndReplace = (text) => {return <Linkify properties={{target:"_blank"}}>{text}</Linkify>;}

Lets visit SUSI WebChat and try it out.

Query: search internet

Response: Internet The global system of interconnected computer networks that use the Internet protocol suite to… https://duckduckgo.com/Internet

The link has been parsed from the response text and has been successfully hyperlinked. Clicking the links opens the respective URL in a new window.

Resources
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How to teach SUSI skills calling an External API

SUSI is an intelligent  personal assistant. SUSI can learn skills to understand and respond to user queries better. A skill is taught using rules. Writing rules is an easy task and one doesn’t need any programming background too. Anyone can start contributing. Check out these tutorials and do watch this video to get started and start teaching susi.

SUSI can be taught to call external API’s to answer user queries.

While writing skills we first mention string patterns to match the user’s query and then tell SUSI what to do with the matched pattern. The pattern matching is similar to regular expressions and we can also retrieve the matched parameters using $<parameter number>$ notation.

Example :

My name is *
Hi $1$!

When the user inputs “My name is Uday” , it is matched with “My name is *” and “Uday” is stored in $1$. So the output given is “Hi Uday!”.

SUSI can call an external API to reply to user query. An API endpoint or url when called must return a JSON or JSONP response for SUSI to be able to parse the response and retrieve the answer.

Rule Format for a skill calling an external API

The rule format for calling an external API is :

<regular expression for pattern matching>
!console: <return answer using $object$ or $required_key$>
{
  “url”:<API endpoint or url>,
  “path”:$.<key in the API response to find the answer>,
}
eol
  • Url is the API endpoint to be called which returns a JSON or JSONP response.
    The parameters to the url if any can be added using $$ notation.
  • Path is used to help susi know where to look for the answer in the returned response.
    If the path points to a root element, then the answer is stored in $object$, otherwise we can query $key$ to get the answer which is a value to the key under the path.
  • eol or end of line indicates the end of the rule.

Understanding the Path Attribute

Let us understand the Path attribute better through some test cases.

In each of the test cases we discuss what the path should be and how to retrieve the answer for a given required answer from the json response of an API.

  1. API response in json :

    {
      “Key1” : “Value1”
    }
    

Required answer : Value1
Path : “$.Key1    =>   Retrieve Answer:  $object$

 

  1. API response in json :
{
  “Key1” : [{“Key11” : “Value11”}]
}

Required answer : Value11
Path : $.Key1[0]   =>  Retrieve Answer: $Key11$
Path : $.Key1[0].Key11   => Retrieve Answer: $object$

 

  1. API response in json :
{
  “Key1” : {“Key11” : “Value11”}
}


Required answer : Value11
Path : $.Key1  => Retrieve Answer:  $Key11$
Path : $.Key1.Key11  => Retrieve Answer: $object$

 

  1. API response in json :
{
  “Key1” : {
           “Key11” : “Value11”,
           “Key12” : “Value12”
         }
}

Required answer : Value11 , Value12
Path : $.Key1  => Retrieve Answer:  $Key11$ , $Key12$

Where to write these rules?

Now, since we know how to write rules let’s see where to write them.

We use etherpads to write and test rules and once we finish testing our rule we can push those rules to the repo.

Steps to open, write and test rules:

  1. Open a new etherpad with a desired name <etherpad name> at http://dream.susi.ai/
  2. Write your skills code in the etherpad following the code format explained above.
  3. Now, to test your skill let’s chat with susi. Start a conversation with susi at http://susi.ai/chat to test your skills.
  4. Load your skills by typing dream <etherpad name> and wait for a response saying dreaming enabled for <etherpad name>
  5. Test your skill and follow step 4 every time you make changes to the code in your etherpad.
  6. After you are done testing, type stop dreaming and if you are satisfied with your skill do send a PR to help susi learn.

Examples

Let us try an example to understand this better.

1. Plot of a TV Show

Tvmaze is an open  TV API that provides information about tv shows. Let us write a rule to know the plot of a tv show. We can find many such APIs. Check out this link listing few of them.

  1.  Open an etherpad at http://dream.susi.ai/ named tvshowplot.
  2.   Enter the code to query plot of a TV show in the etherpad at                           http://dream.susi.ai/p/tvshowplot
* plot of *|* summary of *
!console:$object$
{
  "url":"http://api.tvmaze.com/singlesearch/shows?q=$2$",
  "path":"$.summary"
}
eol
  1. Now lets test our skill by starting a conversation with susi at http://susi.ai/chat.
  • User Query: dream tvshowplot
    Response:  dreaming enabled  for tvshowplot
  • User Query: what is the plot of legion
    Response: Legion introduces the story of David Haller: Since he was a teenager, David has struggled with mental illness. Diagnosed as schizophrenic, David has been in and out of psychiatric hospitals for years. But after a strange encounter with a fellow patient, he’s confronted with the possibility that the voices he hears and the visions he sees might be real. He’s based on the Marvel comics character Legion, the son of X-Men founder Charles Xavier (played by Patrick Stewart and James McAvoy in the films), first introduced in 1985.

Intermediate Processing:

Pattern Matching : $1$ = “what is the” ; $2$ = “legion”

Url : http://api.tvmaze.com/singlesearch/shows?q=legion

API response:

{
  "id": 6393,
  "url": "http:\/\/www.tvmaze.com\/shows\/6393\/legion",
  "name": "Legion",
  "type": "Scripted",
  "language": "English",
  "genres": [
             "Drama",
             "Action",
             "Science-Fiction"
            ],
  "summary": "<p><strong>Legion<\/strong> introduces the story of David Haller: Since he was a teenager, David has struggled with mental illness. Diagnosed as schizophrenic, David has been in and out of psychiatric hospitals for years. But after a strange encounter with a fellow patient, he's confronted with the possibility that the voices he hears and the visions he sees might be real. He's based on the Marvel comics character Legion, the son of X-Men founder Charles Xavier (played by Patrick Stewart and James McAvoy in the films), first introduced in 1985.<\/p>",
  "updated": 1491955072,
}

Note: The API response has been trimmed to show only the relevant content.

Path : $.summary

Retrieving Answer: so our required answer in the api response is under the key summary and is retrieved using $object$ since it is a root element.

 

Screenshots:

2. Cooking Recipes

Let us try it out with another API.
Recipepuppy is an cooking recipe API where users can query various recipes.

  1.  Open a etherpad at http://dream.susi.ai/ named recipe.
  2.   Enter the code to query a recipe in the etherpad at  http://dream.susi.ai/p/recipe
#Gives recipes and links to cook a dish
* cook *
!console:<p>To cook  <strong>$title$</strong> : <br>The ingridients required are: $ingredients$. <br> For instruction to prepare the dish $href$ </p>
{
  "url":"http://www.recipepuppy.com/api/?q=$2$",
  "path":"$.results"
}
eol
  1. Now lets test our skill by starting a conversation with susi at http://susi.ai/chat.
  • User Query: dream recipe
    Response:  dreaming enabled  for recipe
  • User Query: how to cook chicken biryani
    Response: To cook Chicken Biryani Recipe :
    The ingridients required are: chicken, seeds, chicken broth, rice, butter, peas, garlic, red onions, cardamom, curry paste, olive oil, tomato, coriander, cumin, brown sugar, tumeric.
    For instruction to prepare the dish Click Here!

Intermediate Processing:

Pattern Matching : $1$ = “how to” ; $2$ = “chicken biryani”

Url : http://www.recipepuppy.com/api/?q=chicken biryani

API response:

{
  "title": "Recipe Puppy",
  "version": 0.1,
  "href": "http:\/\/www.recipepuppy.com\/",
  "results": [
              {
                "title": "Chicken Biryani Recipe",
                "href": "http:\/\/www.grouprecipes.com\/53040\/chicken-biryani.html",
                "ingredients": "chicken, seeds, chicken broth, rice, butter, peas, garlic, red onions, cardamom, curry paste, olive oil, tomato, coriander, cumin, brown sugar, tumeric",
                "thumbnail": "http:\/\/img.recipepuppy.com\/413822.jpg"
             },
           ]
}

Note: The API response has been trimmed to show only the relevant content.

Path : $.results[0]

Retrieving Answer: so our required answer in the api response is under the key results and since it’s an array we are using the first element of the array and since the element is a dictionary too we use its keys correspondingly to answer. The $href$ is rendered as “Click Here” hyperlinked to the actual url.

 

Screenshots:

 

We have successfully taught susi a skill which tells users about the plot of a tv show and a skill to query recipes.
Cheers!
Following similar procedure, we can make use of other APIs and teach susi several new skills.

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