Create a Wireless Access Point Using a Raspberry Pi to Connect with SUSI Smart Speaker

To use the pi as a wifi bridge, a local network or just as a wifi range extender.We at FOSSASIA are using it as a network to connect between our SUSI.AI smart speaker and the Android and IOS devices. Or maybe because you can !! :’)

Requirements:

  1. Raspberry Pi Model 3(since we will be using an internal wifi)
  2. Power supply for the Pi.
  3. Monitor (optional)
  4. Keyboard (optional)
  5. Mouse (optional)

Steps:

1.Install and upgrade raspbian

 

Sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install

 

2. Install hostapd and dnsmasq .
This will allow us to use our raspberry pi as a wireless access point

 

apt-get remove –purge hostapd -yqq
apt-get update -yqq
apt-get upgrade -yqq
apt-get install hostapd dnsmasq -yqq

 

3. Now we will add broadcasting IP and DNS address in the dnsmasq configuration file

To access the configuration file use:

sudo nano /etc/dnsmasq.co

 

And to the bottom of the file, add the following commands

 

interface=wlan0
dhcp-range=10.0.0.2,10.0.0.5,255.255.255.0,12h

 

  1. Now to select the SSID and the PASSWORD for the access point, we’ll need to change the configurations of hostapd package
sudo nano /etc/hostapd/hostapd.conf

 

Then, use the following commands :

 

interface=wlan0
hw_mode=g
channel=10
auth_algs=1
wpa=2
wpa_key_mgmt=WPA-PSK
wpa_pairwise=CCMP
rsn_pairwise=CCMP
wpa_passphrase=“your_broadcasting_password”
ssid=“your_broadcasting_ssid”
ieee80211n=1
wmm_enabled=1
ht_capab=[HT40][SHORT-GI-20][DSSS_CCK-40]

 

  1. To finally sum up the configuration, we’ll have to create a  custom network interface that combines all the settings that we have made.
sudo nano /etc/network/interfaces

 

And add the following lines it the EOF

allow-hotplug wlan0
iface wlan0 inet static
address 10.0.0.1
netmask 255.255.255.0
network 10.0.0.0
broadcast 10.0.0.255

 

Now, we just have to have to disable default interfaces so that they do not interfere with the custom interfaces that we have made.

To do so

 

sudo nano /etc/dhcpcd.conf

 

Add the following line at the end of the file

denyinterfaces wlan0

 

  1. Now just restart the services

 

systemctl enable hostapd && systemctl enable dnsmasq

sudo service hostapd start && sudo service dnsmasq start

sudo reboot

 

Now, you will be able to enjoy a self-made access point which is used as a basic mode of connection in SUSI Smart Speaker and can also be used in various other access point methods.

 

References

 

Tags

GSOC’18 , FOSSASIA, ACCESS_POINT, SUSI.AI, GSOC, SUSI , SMART_SPEAKER

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Adding Audio Streaming from Youtube in SUSI Linux

In this blog post we will describe how the youtube streaming works in the

SUSI smart speaker and how audio is streamed directly from youtube videos.

To achieve this process, we have used an amazing Open-Source project called MPV music Player along with python libraries like Subprocess.

1.Processing a Query to the server

Firstly , the user asks the smart speaker to play the youtube audio by simply adding a ‘play’ word before his/her favorite song. eg. I’ll say ‘play despacito’ and then the command is recognized and a query is sent to the server which sends the following response as a JSON object.

“actions”: [
     {
       “type”: “answer”,
       “expression”: “Playing Luis Fonsi – Despacito ft. Daddy Yankee”
     },
     {
       “identifier”: “kJQP7kiw5Fk”,
       “identifier_type”: “youtube”,
       “type”: “video_play”
     }]

2.Parsing the response

Then the speaker parses the response in the following way.

The Speaker traverses through all the actions returned in the response and checks for all the “identifier” by assigning a custom class to it.

class VideoAction(BaseAction):
   def __init__(self, identifier , identifier_type):
       super().__init__()
       self.identifier = identifier
       self.identifier_type = identifier_type

Now we check whether the query is the type of a custom class VideoAction and then the client processes the query as the response.

      elif isinstance(action, VideoAction):
          result[‘identifier’] = action.identifier
           audio_url = result[‘identifier’]  

3.Implementing the Actions

Now that we have identified that the response contains a Video Action, we can finally implement a way to play the audio from the URL.
We use a music player called MPV Music Player and the library Subprocess to make it run asynchronously.

if ‘identifier’ in reply.keys():
   classifier = reply[‘identifier’]
   if classifier[:3] == ‘ytd’:
       video_url = reply[‘identifier’]
       video_pid = subprocess.Popen(‘mpv –no-video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v={} –really-quiet &’.format(video_url[4:]), shell=True)  # nosec #pylint-disable type: ignore
       self.video_pid = video_pid.pid


This is how audio is streamed from youtube videos in SUSI Smart Speaker.

Resources

  1. https://github.com/mpv-player/mpv
  2. https://docs.python.org/2/library/subprocess.html
  3. https://github.com/fossasia/susi_linux
  4. https://github.com/fossasia/susi_api_wrapper

Tags

fossasia, gsoc’18, susi, susi.ai, youtube, music, mp3 , mpv, audio stream

 

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Adding Offline support To SUSI Linux

Till now, SUSI smart speaker was working only as an online model like the other speakers in the market. For the first time, we have introduced a feature which allows the speaker to work offline. We deployed the server on the hardware itself and also provide the option of an online server as a fallback.

 

The Offline Support was implemented in the following steps

 

Step 1: Deploying SUSI Server Locally

 

Firstly , configure a bash script to allow automatic deployment of the server along with the initialization of the susi_linux script.

 

echo “Deploying local server”
if  [ ! -e “susi-server” ]
then
   git clone https://github.com/fossasia/susi_server.git
fi

if [ -e “susi_server” ]
then    
   cd susi_server
   git submodule update –recursive –remote
   git submodule update –init –recursive
   ./gradlew build
   bin/start.sh
fi 

 

The above builds the server and deploys it on ‘localhost:4000’.

 

Then, add the following test on SUSI Linux wrapper to check if the local server is up and running. Using the local server not adds an offline support but also increases the efficiency by around 30%.

def check_local_server():
   test_params = {
       ‘q’: ‘Hello’,
       ‘timezoneOffset’: int(time.timezone / 60)
   }
   try:
       chat_url = ‘http://localhost:4000/susi/chat.json’
       if (requests.get(chat_url, test_params)):
           print(‘connected to local server’)
           global api_endpoint
           api_endpoint = ‘http://localhost:4000’
   except requests.exceptions.ConnectionError:
       print(‘local server is down’)


check_local_server()

 

As shown above, this is a test checking for the local server. If the local server is down, the online server is chosen as a fallback

 

Step 2: Adding an Offline STT Service

Now, that we are able to process a query offline. We must have a way in which, we can recognize the user’s voice commands without using the internet. For that, we use the service of PocketSphinx. But first, we check if the internet is available or not

 

def internet_on():
       try:
           urllib2.urlopen(‘http://216.58.192.142’, timeout=1)  # nosec #pylint-disable type: ignore
           return True  # pylint-enable
       except urllib2.URLError as err:
           print(err)
           return False

 

If the internet connection is available, we use the online STT service which is Google STT ( default) and switch over to PocketSphinx in case the internet connection is not available.

 

Step 3: Adding the Offline TTS service

Finally, we’ll need an offline TTS service which will help us turn SUSI’s response to voice commands. We’ll be using a service called flite TTS as our offline TTS.

 

elif payload == ‘ConnectionError’:
            self.notify_renderer(‘error’, ‘connection’)                                  self.notify_renderer(‘error’, ‘connection’)
            config[‘default_tts’] = ‘flite’
            os.system(‘play extras/connect-error.wav’)              

 

We check if there is a ConnectionError, and then we switch to flite TTS after play an error query

 

Final Output:

We now get a Smart Speaker which is functional without any internet connection.

 

References

Tags

 

Fossasia, susi, gsoc, gsoc’18, offline_tts , offline_stt ,flite , pocketsphinx

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Creating a Media Daemon for SUSI Smart Speaker

A daemon in reference of operating systems is a computer program that runs as a background process rather than under direct control of the user. Various daemons are being used in SUSI smart speaker.

The following features have been created

  • Update Daemon
  • Media Discovery Daemon
  • Factory Reset Daemon

In this blog, we’ll be discussing the implementation of the Media Discovery Daemon

Media Discovery Daemon:

The SUSI Smart speaker will have an essential feature which will allow the Users to play music from their USB devices. Hence , a media daemon will be running which will detect a USB connection and then scan it’s contents checking for all the mp3 files and then create custom SUSI skills to allow SUSI Smart Speaker to play music from your USB device.

 

The Media Daemon was implemented in the following steps

1.UDEV Rules

We had to figure out a way to run our daemon as soon as the user inserted the USB storage and stop the daemon as soon as the USB storage was removed

 

So, we used UDEV rules to trigger the Media Daemon.

 

ACTION==“add”, KERNEL==“sd?”, SUBSYSTEM==“block”, ENV{ID_BUS}==“usb”, RUN=“/home/pi/SUSI.AI/susi_linux/media_daemon/autostart.sh”ACTION==“remove, KERNEL==“sd?”, SUBSYSTEM==“block”, ENV{ID_BUS}==“usb”, RUN=“/home/pi/SUSI.AI/susi_linux/media_daemon/autostop.sh”

The Udev rules trigger a script called ‘autostart.sh’  on USB detection and a script called ‘autostop.sh’ on USB removal.

2. Custom Skill Creation

As the USB connection is now detected ,a script is triggered which checks the presence of a  local SUSI server in the repo. If a local server instance is detected,a python script is triggered which parses through the USB mount point and checks for the list of mp3 files present in the storage device and then create a custom skill file in the local server instance.

 

media_daemon_folder = os.path.dirname(os.path.abspath(__file__))
base_folder = os.path.dirname(media_daemon_folder)
server_skill_folder = os.path.join(base_folder, ‘susi_server/susi_server/data/generic_skills/media_discovery’)
server_settings_folder = os.path.join(base_folder, ‘susi_server/susi_server/data/settings’)

def make_skill(): # pylint-enable
   name_of_usb = get_mount_points()
   print(type(name_of_usb))
   print(name_of_usb[0])
   x = name_of_usb[0]
   os.chdir(‘{}’.format(x[1]))
   USB = name_of_usb[0]
   mp3_files = glob(“*.mp3”)
   f = open( media_daemon_folder +‘/custom_skill.txt’,‘w’)
   music_path = list()
   for mp in mp3_files:
       music_path.append(“{}”.format(USB[1]) + “/{}”.format(mp))

   song_list = ” “.join(music_path)
   skills = [‘play audio’,‘!console:Playing audio from your usb device’,‘{“actions”:[‘,‘{“type”:”audio_play”, “identifier_type”:”url”, “identifier”:”file://’+str(song_list) +‘”}’,‘]}’,‘eol’]
   for skill in skills:
       f.write(skill + ‘\n’)
   f.close()
   shutil.move( media_daemon_folder + ‘custom_skill.txt’, server_skill_folder)
   f2 = open(server_settings_folder + ‘customized_config.properties’,‘a’)
   f2.write(‘local.mode = true’)
   f2.close()

def get_usb_devices():
   sdb_devices = map(os.path.realpath, glob(‘/sys/block/sd*’))
   usb_devices = (dev for dev in sdb_devices
       if ‘usb’ in dev.split(‘/’)[5])
   return dict((os.path.basename(dev), dev) for dev in usb_devices)

def get_mount_points(devices=None):
   devices = devices or get_usb_devices() # if devices are None: get_usb_devices
   output = check_output([‘mount’]).splitlines() #nosec #pylint-disable type: ignore
   output = [tmp.decode(‘UTF-8’) for tmp in output ] # pytlint-enable
   def is_usb(path):
       return any(dev in path for dev in devices)
   usb_info = (line for line in output if is_usb(line.split()[0]))
   return [(info.split()[0], info.split()[2]) for info in usb_info] 

 

Now a custom skill file will be created in the local server instance by the name of `custom_skill.txt` and the user can play audio from USB by speaking the command ‘play audio’

 

3. Preparing for the Next USB insertion

Now if the User wants to update his/her music library or wants to use another USB storage device. The USB will be removed and hence the custom skill file is also deleted from the script ‘autstop.sh’ which is triggered via the UDEV rules

#! /bin/bash

SCRIPT_PATH=$(realpath $0)
DIR_PATH=$(dirname $SCRIPT_PATH)

cd $DIR_PATH/../susi_server/susi_server/data/generic_skills/media_discovery/

sudo rm custom_skill.txt  

 

This is how the Media Discovery Daemon works in SUSI Smart Speaker

 

References

Tags

gsoc, gsoc’18 , fossasia, susi.ai, smart speaker, media daemon, susi skills

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Connecting to a Raspberry Pi through a SSH connection Wirelessly

The tech stack of the SUSI.AI smart speaker project is mainly Python/Bash scripts. Every smart speaker has an essential feature that allows the user’s mobile device to connect and give instructions to the speaker wirelessly. To make this connection possible, we are trying to implement this using an SSH connection.

Why SSH?

SSH(a.k.a Secure Shell) is a cryptographic connection which allows secure transfer of data even over an unsecured connection.SSH connection even allows TCP as well as X11 forwarding which are an added bonus.

Step 1: Initial Setup

  • Both the raspberry Pi with raspbian installed and the mobile device should be on a same wireless network
  • One should have an SSH viewer like JuiceSSH(Android) and iTerminal(IOS) installed on their mobile devices
  • Now we must enable SSH on our raspberry Pi

Step 2: Enabling SSH on Raspberry PI

  • To enable SSH on your Pi , follow the steps mentioned below:
Menu > Preferences > Raspberry Pi Configuration.

Choose the interfaces tab and enable SSH

Step 3:Setting Up the client

 

  • Login to your raspberry pi as the root user (pi by default)
  • Type the following command to know the broadcasting ip address
[email protected]:hostname -I

 

  • Now , open the client on your mobile device and add the configurations

By default the username of the system is ‘pi’ and the password is ‘raspberry’

Step 4: Changing the default SSH password

Since the default password of every RaspberryPi is the same. So , the pi can be accessed by any device that has access to the local network which is not a secure way of accessing the device

  • In the SSH window type ‘passwd’
  • Type the current password
  • Type the new password
  • Re-enter the new password

Now you will be able to login to your raspberry through an SSH connection

Resources


Tags

Fossasia, gsoc, gsoc’18, susi, susi.ai, hardware,susi_linux

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