Registering Organizations’ Repositories for Continuous Integration with Yaydoc

Among various features implemented in Yaydoc was the introduction of a modal in the Web Interface used for Continuous Deployment. The modal was used to register user’s repositories to Yaydoc. All the registered repositories then had their documentation updated continuously at each commit made to the repository. This functionality is achieved using Github Webhooks.

The implementation was able to perform the continuous deployment successfully. However, there was a limitation that only the public repositories owned by a user could be registered. Repositories owned by some organisations, which the user either owned or had admin access to couldn’t be registered to Yaydoc.

In order to perform this enhancement, a select tag was added which contains all the organizations the user have authorized Yaydoc to access. These organizations were received from Github’s Organization API using the user’s access token.

/**
 * Retrieve a list of organization the user has access to
 * @param accessToken: Access Token of the user
 * @param callback: Returning the list of organizations
 */
exports.retrieveOrgs = function (accessToken, callback) {
  request({
    url: ‘https://api.github.com/user/orgs’,
    headers: {
      ‘User-Agent’: ‘request’,
      ‘Authorization’: ‘token ’ + accessToken
    }
  }, function (error, response, body) {
    var organizations = [];
    var bodyJSON = JSON.parse(body);
    bodyJSON.forEach(function (organization) {
      organizations.push(organization.login);
    });
    return callback(organizations);
  });
};

On selecting a particular organization from the select tag, the list of repositories is updated. The user then inputs a query in a search input which on submitting shows a list of repositories that matches the tag. An AJAX get request is sent to Github’s Search API in order to retrieve all the repositories matching the keyword.

$(function () {
  ....
$.get(`https://api.github.com/search/repositories?q=user:${username}+fork:true+${searchBarInput.val()}`, function (result) {
    ....
    result.items.forEach(function (repository) {
      options +=<option>+ repo.full_name +</option>’;
    });
    ....
  });
  ....
});

The selected repository is then submitted to the backend where the repository is registered in Yaydoc’s database and a hook is setup to Yaydoc’s CI, as it was happening with user’s repositories. After a successful registration, every commit on the user’s or organization’s repository sends a webhook on receiving which, Yaydoc performs the documentation generation and deployment process.

Resources:

  1. Github’s Organization API: https://developer.github.com/v3/orgs/
  2. Github’s Search API: https://developer.github.com/v3/search/
  3. Simplified HTTP Request Client: https://github.com/request/request

Using API Blueprint with Yaydoc

As part of extending the capability of Yaydoc to document APIs, this week we integrated API Blueprint with Yaydoc. Now we can parse apib files and add the parsed content to the generated documentation. From the official Homepage of API Blueprint,

API Blueprint is simple and accessible to everybody involved in the API lifecycle. Its syntax is concise yet expressive. With API Blueprint you can quickly design and prototype APIs to be created or document and test already deployed mission-critical APIs. It is a documentation-oriented web API description language. The API Blueprint is essentially a set of semantic assumptions laid on top of the Markdown syntax used to describe a web API.

To Integrate API Blueprint with Yaydoc, we used an sphinx extension named sphinxcontrib-apiblueprint. This extension can directly translate text in API Blueprint format into docutils nodes. The advantage with this approach as compared to using tools like aglio is that the generated html fits in nicely with the already existent theme. Though we may in future provide ability to generate html using tools like aglio if the user prefers. Adding an extension to sphinx is very easy. In the conf.py template, we added the extension to the already enabled list of extensions.

extensions += [‘sphinxcontrib.apiblueprint’]

The above extension provides a directive apiblueprint which can be then used to include apib files. The directive is very similar to the built in include directive. The difference is just that it should be only be used to include files in API Blueprint format. You can see an example below of how to use this directive.

.. apiblueprint:: <path to apib file>

Although this is enough for projects which use the ResT markup format, This cannot be used with projects using markdown as the primary markup format, since markdown doesn’t support the concept of directives. To solve this, we used the eval_rst block provided by recommonmark in Yaydoc. It allows users to embed valid ReST within markdown and recommonmark will properly parse the embedded text as ReST. Now a user can use this to use directives within markdown. You can see an example below.

```eval_rst
.. apiblueprint:: <path to apib file>
```

In order to implement this, we used the AutoStructify class provided by recommonmark. Here’s a snippet from our conf.py template. Note that this does have far reaching effects. Now users would be able to use this to add constructs like toctree in markdown which wasn’t possible before.

from recommonmark.transform import AutoStructify

def setup(app):
    app.add_config_value('recommonmark_config', {
    'enable_eval_rst': True,
    }, True)
    app.add_transform(AutoStructify)

Let’s see all of this in action. Here’s a preview of a generated documentation with API Blueprint using Yaydoc.

Resources

Testing Deploy Functions Using Sinon.JS in Yaydoc

In yaydoc, we deploy the generated documentation to the GitHub pages as well as Heroku. It is one of the important functions in the source code. I don’t want to break the build in future by any unnoticed change, so I decided to write a test case for deploy function. But the deploy function had lot dependencies like child processes, sockets, etc. Also it is not a pure function, so there is no return object to assert the value. Then I decided to stub for child process to check whether the correct script was passed or not. In order to write stub I decided to use sinon js framework because it can be used for writing stubs, mocks and spies. One of the advantages with sinon is that it’ll work with any testing framework.

sinon.stub(require("child_process"), "spawn").callsFake(function (fileName, args) {
  if (fileName !== "./ghpages_deploy.sh" ) {
    throw new Error(`invalid ${fileName} invoked`);
  }

  if (fileName === "./ghpages_deploy.sh") {
    let ghArgs = ["-e", "-i", "-n", "-o", "-r"];
    ghArgs.forEach(function (x)  {
      if (args.indexOf(x) < 0) {
        throw new Error(`${x} argument is not passed`);
      }
    })
  }
 
  let process = {
    on: function (listenerId, callback) {
      if (listenerId !== "exit") {
        throw new Error("listener id is not exit");
      }
    }
  }
  return process;
});

In sinon you can create s stub by passing the object in the first parameter and the method name in the second parameter to sinon’s stub method. After it returns an object, pass the function which you would like to replace with the “callFakes” function.

In above code, I wrote a simple stub which overwrites NodeJS child_process’s spawn method. So I passed the “child_process” module in the first parameter and “spawn” method name in the second parameter. You must check whether they are passing the correct deploy script and the correct parameter. So, I wrote a function which checks the condition and then pass the method to the callFakes method.

describe('deploy script', function() {
  it("gh-pages deploy", function() {
    deploy.deployPages(fakeSocket, {
      gitURL: "https://github.com/sch00lb0y/yaydoc.git",
      encryptedToken: crypter.encrypt("dummykey"),
      email: "[email protected]",
      uniqueId: "ajshdahsdh",
      username: "fossasia"
    });
  });
});

Finally test the deploy function by calling it. I use mocha as a testing framework. I have already written a blog on mocha. If you’re interested in mocha please check out this blog.

Resources:

Advanced configurations in Yaydoc’s Web UI

Yaydoc’s User Interface consists of a form with three required fields; the user’s email address, git repository’s URL, and a theme for the generated website. Specific values of these fields are the minimum requirement to generate documentation for a project. There are certain other configuration variables for whom we assumed default values. Among these, we assumed `docs/` directory or the directory specified in the `yaydoc.yml` configuration file as the default path for the documentation. Also, `Default Branch` is assumed as the branch to generate documentation website. However, this cannot guarantee the generation of docs for every other project. These configurations can have different values based on a project.

Thus, there was a need to include certain input values for advanced configuration. The addition of these configurations in the UI doesn’t compel the user to specify them. In our attempt to improve user’s experience, we show the default values to the user when they are specifying custom values for these configurations.

If the user doesn’t specify a value for the repository’s branch, a default value is retrieved from Github’s Repository Components API, taking repository’s URL from the required input as the input URL.

/**
 * Setting the branch name with `default_branch` attriburte from
 * Github’s Repository Components API
 * @param gitUrl: URL of the github repository
 */
setDefaultBranchName: function (gitUrl) {
  var owner = gitUrl.split(“/”)[3] || ‘’;
  var repository = gitUrl.split(“/”)[4] || ‘’).split(‘.’)[0] || ‘’;
  $.get(‘https://api.github.com/repos/’ + owner + ‘/’ + repository, {
    headers: {“User-Agent”: “Yaydoc”}
  }).complete(function (data) {
    $(“#target_branch”).val(data.responseJSON.default_branch);
  });
}

There are certain cases in which the design of the Web User Interface could have been confusing. Since we are displaying all the advanced configurations at once, it could’ve appeared to the users that they are specifying empty values for the other. Thus to handle this, inputs were enabled on toggle when a checkbox beside them was checked. This was achieved making following changes in the front end of the code.

/**
 * Toggle editing of Branch Name input
 */
$(“#btnEditBranch”).click(function () {
  styles.toggleEditing(“target_branch”);
  ....
  ....
});

/**
 * Toggle Enabling/Disabling an input tag
 * @param id: `id` attribute of input tag
 */
toggleEditing: function (id) {
  const input = $(‘#’ + id);
  if (input.attr(‘disabled’)) {
    input.removeAttr(‘disabled’);
    $(‘#checkbox_’ + id).removeClass(‘glyphicon-unchecked’).addClass(‘glyphicon-check’);
  } else {
    input.attr(‘disabled’, ‘disabled’);
    $(‘checkbox_’ + id).removeClass(‘glyphicon-check’).addClass(‘glyphicon-unchecked’);
  }
}

Introducing advanced configurations to the User Interface has opened the possibility for even more projects to generate and deploy docs with much lesser constraints. One of our main aim for this project is to have a fairly simple UI and UX and we hope to bring further updated to achieve that.

Resources:

  1. Github’s Repository API: https://developer.github.com/v3/repos/
  2. jQuery’s AJAX Requests: https://api.jquery.com/jquery.get

Continuous Integration in Yaydoc using GitHub webhook API

In Yaydoc,  Travis is used for pushing the documentation for each and every commit. But this leads us to rely on a third party to push the documentation and also in long run it won’t allow us to implement new features, so we decided to do the continuous documentation pushing on our own. In order to build the documentation for each and every commit we have to know when the user is pushing code. This can be achieved by using GitHub webhook API. Basically we have to register our api to specific GitHub repository, and then GitHub will send a POST request to our API on each and every commit.

“auth/ci” handler is used to get access of the user. Here we request user to give access to Yaydoc such as accessing the public repositories , read organization details and write permission to write webhook to the repository and also I maintaining state by keeping the ci session as true so that I can know that this callback is for gh-pages deploy or ci deployOn

On callback I’m keeping the necessary informations like username, access_token, id and email in session. Then based on ci session state, I’m redirecting to the appropriate handler. In this case I’m redirecting to “ci/register”.After redirecting to the “ci/register”, I’m getting all the public repositories using GitHub API and then I’m asking the users to choose the repository on which users want to integrate Yaydoc CI

After redirecting to the “ci/register”, I’m getting all the public repositories using GitHub API and then I’m asking the users to choose the repository on which users want to integrate Yaydoc CI

router.post('/register', function (req, res, next) {
      request({
        url: `https://api.github.com/repos/${req.session.username}/${repositoryName}/hooks?access_token=${req.session.token}`,
        method: 'POST',
        json: {
          name: "web",
          active: true,
          events: [
            "push"
          ],
          config: {
            url: process.env.HOSTNAME + '/ci/webhook',
            content_type: "json"
          }
        }
      }, function(error, response, body) {
        repositoryModel.newRepository(req.body.repository,
          req.session.username,
          req.session.githubId,
          crypter.encrypt(req.session.token),
          req.session.email)
          .then(function(result) {
            res.render("index", {
              showMessage: true,
              messages: `Thanks for registering with Yaydoc.Hereafter Documentation will be pushed to the GitHub pages on each commit.`
            })
          })
      })
    }
  })

After user choose the repository, they will send a POST request to “ci/register” and then I’m registering the webhook to the repository and I’m saving the repository, user details in the database, so that it can be used when GitHub send request to push the documentation to the GitHub Pages.

router.post('/webhook', function(req, res, next) {
  var event = req.get('X-GitHub-Event')
  if (event == 'Push') {
      repositoryModel.findOneRepository(
        {
          githubId: req.body.repository.owner.id,
          name: req.body.repository.name
        }
      ).
      then(function(result) {
        var data = {
          email: result.email,
          gitUrl: req.body.repository.clone_url,
          docTheme: "",
        }
        generator.executeScript({}, data, function(err, generatedData) {
            deploy.deployPages({}, {
              email: result.email,
              gitURL: req.body.repository.clone_url,
              username: result.username,
              uniqueId: generatedData.uniqueId,
              encryptedToken: result.accessToken
            })
        })
      })
      res.json({
        status: true
      })
   }
})

After you register on webhook, GitHub will send a request to the url which we registered on the repository. In our case “https:/yaydoc.herokuapp.com/ci/auth” is the url. The type of the event can be known by reading ‘X-GitHub-Event’ header. Right now I’m registering only for the push event. So we’ll only be getting the push event. GitHub also gives us the repository details in the request body.

When the user makes a commit to the repository, GitHub will send a POST request to the Yaydoc’s server. Then, we’ll get the repository name and Github’s user ID from the request body. By use of this, I’ll retrieve the access token from the database which we already registered while the user registers the repository to the CI. The documentation will be generated using generate script and pushed to GitHub pages using deploy script.

Now Yaydoc generates documentation on every push when the user commits to the repository and also it will enable us to integrate new features in our own custom environment. We also plan to build a full featured CI platform.

Resources:

Generating responsive email using mjml in Yaydoc

In Yaydoc, an email with a download, preview and deploy link will be sent to the user after documentation is generated. But then initially, Yaydoc was sending email in plain text without any styling, so I decided to make an attractive HTML email template for it. The problem with HTML email is adding custom CSS and making it responsive, because the emails will be seen on various devices like mobile, tablet and desktops. When going through the GitHub trending list, I came across mjml and was totally stunned by it’s capabilities. Mjml is a responsive email generation framework which is built using React (popular front-end framework maintained by Facebook)

Install mjml to your system using npm.

npm init -y && npm install mjml

Then add mjml to your path

export PATH="$PATH:./node_modules/.bin”

Mjml has a lot of react components pre-built for creating the responsive email. For example mj-text, mj-image, mj-section etc…

Here I’m sharing the snippet used for generating email in Yaydoc.

<mjml>
  <mj-head>
    <mj-attributes>
      <mj-all padding="0" />
      <mj-class name="preheader" color="#CB202D" font-size="11px" font-family="Ubuntu, Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif" padding="0" />
    </mj-attributes>
    <mj-style inline="inline">
      a { text-decoration: none; color: inherit; }
 
    </mj-style>
  </mj-head>
  <mj-body>
    <mj-container background-color="#ffffff">
 
      <mj-section background-color="#CB202D" padding="10px 0">
        <mj-column>
          <mj-text align="center" color="#ffffff" font-size="20px" font-family="Lato, Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif" padding="18px 0px">Hey! Your documentation generated successfully<i class="fa fa-address-book-o" aria-hidden="true"></i>
 
          </mj-text>
        </mj-column>
      </mj-section>
      <mj-section background-color="#ffffff" padding="20px 0">
        <mj-column>
          <mj-image src="http://res.cloudinary.com/template-gdg/image/upload/v1498552339/play_cuqe89.png" width="85px" padding="0 25px">
</mj-image>
 
          <mj-text align="center" color="#EC652D" font-size="20px" font-family="Lato, Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif" vertical-align="top" padding="20px 25px">
            <strong><a>Preview it</a></strong>
            <br />
          </mj-text>
        </mj-column>
        <mj-column>
          <mj-image src="http://res.cloudinary.com/template-gdg/image/upload/v1498552331/download_ktlqee.png" width="100px" padding="0 25px" >
        </mj-image>
          <mj-text align="center" color="#EC652D" font-size="20px" font-family="Lato, Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif" vertical-align="top" padding="20px 25px">
            <strong><a>Download it</a></strong>
            <br />
          </mj-text>
        </mj-column>
        <mj-column>
          <mj-image src="http://res.cloudinary.com/template-gdg/image/upload/v1498552325/deploy_yy3oqw.png" width="100px" padding="0px 25px" >
        </mj-image>
          <mj-text align="center" color="#EC652D" font-size="20px" font-family="Lato, Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif" vertical-align="top" padding="20px 25px">
 
            <strong><a>Deploy it</a></strong>
            <br />
          </mj-text>
        </mj-column>
      </mj-section>
      <mj-section background-color="#333333" padding="10px">
        <mj-column>
        <mj-text align="center" color="#ffffff" font-size="20px" font-family="Lato, Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif" padding="18px 0px">Thanks for using Yaydoc<i class="fa fa-address-book-o" aria-hidden="true"></i>
        </mj-column>
        </mj-text>
      </mj-section>
    </mj-container>
  </mj-body>
</mjml>

The main goal of this example is to make a responsive email which looks like the image given below. So, In mj-head tag, I have imported all the necessary fonts using the mj-class tag and wrote my custom CSS in mj-style. Then I made a container with one row and one column using mj-container, mj-section and mj-column tag and changed the container background color to #CB202D using background-color attribute, then In that container I wrote a heading which says `Hey! Your documentation generated successfully`  with mj-text tag, Then you will get the red background top bar with the success message. Then moving on to the second part, I made a container with three columns and added one image to each column using mj-image tag by specifying image URL as src attribute, added the corresponding text below the mj-image tag using the mj-text tag. At last,  I  made one more container as the first one with different message saying `Thanks for using yaydoc`  with background color #333333

At last, transpile your mjml code to HTML by executing the following command.

mjml -r index.mjml -o index.html

Rendered Email
Resources:

Testing child process using Mocha in Yaydoc

Mocha is a javascript testing framework. It can be used in both nodeJS and browser as well, also it is one of the most popular testing framework available out there. Mocha is widely used for the Behavior Driven Development (BDD). In yaydoc, we are using mocha to test our web UI. One of the main task in yaydoc is documentation generation. We build a bash script to do our documentation generation. We run the bash script using node’s child_process module, but then in order to run the test you have to execute the child process before test execution. This can be achieved by mochas’s before hook. Install mocha in to your system

npm install -g mocha

Here is the test case which i wrote in yaydoc test file.

const assert = require('assert')
const spawn = require('child_process').spawn
const uuidV4 = require("uuid/v4")
describe('WebUi Generator', () => {
  let uniqueId = uuidV4()
  let email = [email protected].com'
  let args = [
    "-g", "https://github.com/fossasia/yaydoc.git",
    "-t", "alabaster",
    "-m", email,
    "-u", uniqueId,
    "-w", "true"
  ]
  let exitCode

  before((done) => {
    let process = spawn('./generate.sh', args)
    process.on('exit', (code) => {
      exitCode = code
      done()
    })
  })
  it('exit code should be zero', () => {
    assert.equal(exitCode, 0)
  })
 })

Describe() function is used to describe our test case. In our scenario we’re testing the generate script so we write as webui generator. As I mentioned above we have to run our child_process in before hook. It() function is the place where we write our test case. If the test case fails, an error will be thrown. We use the assert module from mocha to do the assertion. You can see our assertion in first it()  block for checking exit code is zero or not.

mocha test.js --timeout 1500000

Since documentation takes time so we have to mention time out while running mocha. If your test case passes successfully, you will get output similar to this.

WebUi Generator
    ✓ exit code should be zero

Resources:

 

Documenting APIs with Yaydoc

API Documentation is a quick and concise way to tell a user about how to use a library or work with a program. It details classes, functions, parameters, return types and more. Courtesy of Sphinx, Yaydoc had build in support for Documenting APIs for Python based projects right from it’s inception. Sphinx has a built in tool autodoc which provides certain directives such as autoclass, automodule, etc which can be used to automatically extract docstrings from all specified Python packages and modules and use it to generate API documentation. As a user of Yaydoc you could add ReST sources files with appropriate directives provided by autodoc and we would handle the rest. As part of enhancing this feature we wanted to do three things.

  • Enhance support for Python
  • Extend API documentation to other languages apart from Python
  • Automate the process of generating ReST source files

For Enhancing support for python projects, we implemented a few things.

Since autodoc imports the modules it needs to document, There could be import errors if a dependency was not met. To fix this issue, Now a user can specify certain modules to be mocked. This would really come in handy with projects depending on packages with third party C extensions such as numpy, scipy, etc.

{% if mock_modules %}
mock_modules = [name.strip() for name in '{{ mock_modules }}'.split(',')]
sys.modules.update((mod_name, mock.Mock()) for mod_name in mock_modules)
{% endif %}

Apart from this, if we detect a setup.py in the repository or a requirements.txt, we automatically try to install from it to meet dependencies.

# autodoc imports the module while building source files. To avoid
# ImportError, install any packages in requirements.txt of the project
# if available
if [ -f $ROOT_DIR/setup.py ]; then
  pip install $ROOT_DIR/
elif [ -f $ROOT_DIR/requirements.txt ]; then
  pip install -q -r $ROOT_DIR/requirements.txt
fi

We also crawl the repository to detect any packages and add them to sys.path. With these changes, a user can expected generated API docs without having to extend conf.py.

{% if autoapi_python == 'true' %}
for (dirpath, dirnames, filenames) in os.walk('{{ root_dir }}'):
    # Directory contains __init__.py. It should be a python package
    if '__init__.py' in filenames:
        # appending instead of inserting at front so that user
        # cannot overwrite some of our own modules.
        sys.path.append(os.path.abspath(os.path.dirname(dirpath)))
{% endif %}

The second goal is a no brainer. We would like to support as many languages as we can. With this week’s update, Java has been added to the officially supported list of languages for which Yaydoc can generate full API documentation without any manual intervention. To extract API documentation for java source files, we used a sphinx extension named javasphinx. From the official javasphinx docs,

javasphinx is a Sphinx extension that provides a Sphinx domain for documenting Java projects and a javasphinx-apidoc command line tool for automatically generating API documentation from existing Java source code and Javadoc documentation.

javasphinx-apidoc -o source/ $ROOT_DIR/$AUTOAPI_JAVA_PATH/
sphinx-apidoc -o source/ $ROOT_DIR/$AUTOAPI_PYTHON_PATH/

For the third goal, we use the tools sphinx-apidoc and javasphinx-apidoc to generate source files.

Resources

Improving Custom PyPI Theme Support In Yaydoc

Yaydoc has been supporting custom themes from nearly it’s inception. Themes, which it could not find locally, it would automatically try to install it via pip and set up appropriate metadata about the themes in the generated conf.py.  It was one of the first major enhancement we provided as compared to when using bare sphinx to generate documentation. Since then, a large number of features have been added to ease the process of documentation generation but the core theming aspects have remained unchanged.

To use a theme, sphinx needs the exact name of the theme and the absolute path to it. To obtain these metadata, the existing implementation accessed the __file__ attribute of the imported package to get the absolute path to the __init__.py file, a necessary element of all python packages. From there we searched for a file named theme.conf, and thus the directory containing that file was our required theme.

There were a few mistakes in our earlier implementation. For starters, we assumed that the distribution name of the theme in PyPI and the package name which should be imported would be same. This is generally true but is not necessary. One such theme from PyPI is Flask-Sphinx-Themes. While you need to install it using

pip install Flask-Sphinx-Themes

yet to import it in a module one needs to

import flask_sphinx_themes

This lead to build errors when specific themes like this was used. To solve this, we used the pkg_resources package. It allows us to get various metadata about a package in an abstract way without needing to specifically handle if the package is zipped or not.

try:
    dist = pkg_resources.get_distribution('{{ html_theme }}')
    top_level = list(dist._get_metadata('top_level.txt'))[0]
    dist_path = os.path.join(dist.location, top_level)
except (pkg_resources.DistributionNotFound, IndexError):
    print("\nError with distribution {0}".format('{{ html_theme }}'))
    html_theme = 'fossasia_theme'
    html_theme_path = ['_themes']

The idea here is that instead of searching for __init__.py, we read the name of the top_level directory using the first entry of the top_level.txt, a file created by setuptools when installing the package. We build the path by joining the location attribute of the Distribution object and the name of the top_level directory. The advantage with this approach is that we don’t need to import anything and thus no longer need to know the exact package name.

With this update, Support for custom themes has been greatly increased.

Resources

gh-pages Publishing in Yaydoc’s Web UI

A few weeks back we rolled out the web interface for yaydoc. Web UI will enable user to generate the documentation with one click and users can download the zipped format of generated documentation. In Yaydoc, we now added the additional feature of deploying the generated documentation to the GITHUB pages. In order to push the generated documentation, we have to get the access token of the user. So I used passport Github’s strategy to get the access token of the users.

passport.use(new githubStrategy({
  clientID: process.env.CLIENTID,
  clientSecret: process.env.CLIENTSECRET,
  callbackURL: process.env.CALLBACKURL
}, function (accessToken, refreshToken, profile, cb) {
  profile.token = accessToken;
  cb(null, profile)
}))

passport.serializeUser(function(user, cb) {
  cb(null, user);
});

passport.deserializeUser(function(obj, cb) {
  cb(null, obj);
}); 

After setting the necessary environment variables, we have to pass the strategy to the express handler.

router.get("/github", function (req, res, next) {
  req.session.uniqueId = req.query.uniqueId;
  req.session.email = req.query.email
  req.session.gitURL = req.query.gitURL
  next()
}, passport.authenticate('github', {
  scope: [
    'public_repo',
    'read:org'
  ]
}))

For maintaining state, I’m keeping the necessary information in the session so, that in the callback URL we know which repository have to push.

 

router.get("/callback", passport.authenticate('github'), function (req, res, next) {
  req.session.username = req.user.username;
  req.session.token = req.user.token
  res.redirect("/deploy")
})

router.get("/deploy", function (req, res, next) {
  res.render("deploy", {
    email: req.session.email,
    gitURL: req.session.gitURL,
    uniqueId: req.session.uniqueId,
    token: crypter.encrypt(req.session.token),
    username: req.session.username
  })
})

Github will send the access token to our callback. After this I’m templating the necessary information to the jade deploy template where it’ll invoke the deploy function via sockets. Then we’ll stream all the bash output log to the website.

io.on('connection', function(socket){
  socket.on('execute', function (formData) {
    generator.executeScript(socket, formData);
  });
  socket.on('deploy', function (data) {
    ghdeploy.deployPages(socket, data);
  });
});

exports.deployPages = function (socket, data) {
  var donePercent = 0;
  var repoName = data.gitURL.split("/")[4].split(".")[0];
  var webUI = "true";
  var username = data.username
  var oauthToken = crypter.decrypt(data.encryptedToken)
  const args = [
    "-e", data.email,
    "-i", data.uniqueId,
    "-w", webUI,
    "-n", username,
    "-o", oauthToken,
    "-r", repoName
  ];
  var process = spawn("./publish_docs.sh", args);

  process.stdout.on('data', function (data) {
    console.log(data.toString());
    socket.emit('deploy-logs', {donePercent: donePercent, data: data.toString()});
    donePercent += 18;
  });

  process.stderr.on('data', function (data) {
    console.log(data.toString());
    socket.emit('err-logs', data.toString());
  });

  process.on('exit', function (code) {
    console.log('child process exited with code ' + code);
    if (code === 0) {
      socket.emit('deploy-success', {pagesURL: "https://" + data.username + ".github.io/" + repoName});
    }
  });
}

Once documentation is pushed to gh-pages, the documentation URL will get appended to the web UI.

Resources: