How Anonymous Mode is Implemented in SUSI Android

Login and signup are an important feature for some android apps like chat app because user wants to save messages and secure messages from others. In SUSI Android we save messages for logged in user on the server corresponding to their account. But  users can also  use the app without logging in. In this blog, I will show you how the anonymous mode is implemented in SUSI Android .

When the user logs in using the username and password we provide a token to user for a limited amount of time, but in case of anonymous mode we never provide a token to the user and also we set ANONYMOUS_LOGGED_IN flag true which shows that the user is using the app anonymously.

PrefManager.clearToken()

PrefManager.putBoolean(Constant.ANONYMOUS_LOGGED_IN, true)

We use ANONYMOUS_LOGGED_IN flag to check user is using the app anonymously or not. When a user opens the app we first check user is already logged in or not. If the user is not logged in then we check ANONYMOUS_LOGGED_IN flag is true or false. The true means user is using the app in anonymous mode.

if(PrefManager.getBoolean(Constant.ANONYMOUS_LOGGED_IN, false)) {

 intent = new Intent(LoginActivity.this, MainActivity.class);

startActivity(intent);

}

Else we show login page to the user. The user can use app either by login using username and password or anonymously by clicking skip button. On clicking skip button ANONYMOUS_LOGGED_IN flag set to true.

public void skip() {

Intent intent = new Intent(LoginActivity.this,MainActivity.class);

PrefManager.clearToken();

PrefManager.putBoolean(Constant.ANONYMOUS_LOGGED_IN, true);

startActivity(intent);

}

If the user is using the app in anonymous mode but he/she want to login then he/she can login. There is an option for login in menu.

When the user selects login option from the menu, then it redirects the user to the login screen and ANONYMOUS_LOGGED_IN flag is set to false. ANONYMOUS_LOGGED_IN flag is set to false to ensure that instead of login if the user closes the app and again open it, then he/she can’t use the app until logged in or click skip button.

case R.id.action_login:

PrefManager.putBoolean(Constant.ANONYMOUS_LOGGED_IN, false);

Reference

How Settings of SUSI Android App Are Saved on Server

The SUSI Android allows users to specify whether they want to use the action button of soft keyboard as carriage return or else send action. The user can use SUSI.AI on different client like Android , iOS, Web. To give user uniform experience, we need to save user settings on the server so that if the user makes any change in setting in any chat client then that it changes in other chat clients too. So every chat client must store user specific data on the server to make sure that all chat clients access this data and maintain the same state for that particular user and must accordingly push and pull user data from and to the server to update the state of the app.

We used special key to store setting information on server. For eg.

Setting Key Value Use
Enter As Send enter_send true/false true means pressing enter key send message and false means pressing enter key adds new line.
Mic Input mic_input true/false true means default input method is speech but supports keyboard input too. false means the only input method is keyboard input.
Speech Always speech_always true/false true means we get speech output irrespective of input type.
Speech Output speech_output true/false true means we get speech output in case of speech input and false means we don’t get speech output.
Theme theme dark/light dark means theme is dark and light means theme is light

How setting is stored to server

Whenever user settings are changed, the client updates the changed settings on the server so that the state is maintained across all chat clients. When user change setting, we send three parameters to the server ‘key’, ‘value’ and ‘token’. For eg. let ‘Enter As Send’ is set to false. When user changes it from false to true, we immediately update it on the server. Here key will be ‘enter_send’ and value will be ‘true’.

The endpoint used to add or update User Settings is :

BASE_URL+’/aaa/changeUserSettings.json?key=SETTING_NAME&value=SETTING_VALUE&access_token=ACCESS_TOKEN’

SETTING_NAME’ is the key of the corresponding setting, ‘SETTING_VALUE’ is it’s updated value and ‘ACCESS_TOKEN’ is used to find correct user account. We used the retrofit library for network call.

settingResponseCall = ClientBuilder().susiApi .changeSettingResponse(key, value,  PrefManager.getToken())

If the user successfully updated the setting on the server then server reply with message ‘You successfully changed settings of your account!’

How setting is retrieved from server

We retrieve setting from the server when user login. The endpoint used to fetch User Settings is

BASE_URL+’/aaa/listUserSettings.json?access_token=ACCESS_TOKEN’

It requires “ACCESS_TOKEN” to retrieve setting data for a particular user. When user login, we use getUserSetting method to retrieve setting data from the server. PrefManager.getToken() is used to get “ACCESS_TOKEN”.

userSettingResponseCall = ClientBuilder().susiApi .getUserSetting(PrefManager.getToken())

We use userSettingResponseCall to get a response of ‘UserSetting’ type using which we can retrieve different setting from the server. ‘UserSetting’ contain ‘Session’ and ‘Settings’ and ‘Settings’ contain the value of all settings. We save the value of all settings on the server in string format, so after retrieving settings we convert them into the required format. For eg. ‘Enter As Send’ value is of boolean format, so after retrieving we convert it to boolean format.

var settings: Settings ?= response.body().settings

utilModel.setEnterSend((settings?.enterSend.toString()).toBoolean())

Reference

Displaying a Comments dialogfragment on a Button Click from the Feed Adapter in the Open Event Android App

Developing the live feed of the event page from Facebook for the Open Event Android App, there were questions how best to display the comments in the feed.  A dialog fragment over the feeds on the click of a button was the most suitable solution. Now the problem was, a dialogfragment can only be called from an app component (eg- fragment or an activity). Therefore, the only challenge which remained was to call the dialogfragment from the adapter over the feed fragment with the corresponding comments of the particular post on a button click.

What is a dialogfragment?

A dialogfragment displays a dialog window, floating on top of its activity’s window. This fragment contains a Dialog object, which it displays as appropriate based on the fragment’s state. Control of the dialog (deciding when to show, hide, dismiss it) should be done through the API here, not with direct calls on the dialog (Developer.Android.com).

Solution

The solution which worked on was to define a adapter callback interface with a onMethodCallback method in the feed adapter class itself with the list of comment items fetched at runtime on the button click of a particular post. The interface had to be implemented by the main activity which housed the feed fragment that would be creating the comments dialogfragment with the passed list of comments.

Implementation

Define an interface adapterCallback with the method onMethodCallback parameterized by the list of comment items in your adapter class.

public interface AdapterCallback {
   void onMethodCallback(List<CommentItem> commentItems);
}

 

Create a constructor of the adapter with the adapterCallback as a parameter. Do not forget to surround it with a try/catch.

public FeedAdapter(Context context, AdapterCallback adapterCallback, List<FeedItem> feedItems) {
     this.mAdapterCallback = adapterCallback;
}

 

On the click of the comments button, call onMethodCallback method with the corresponding comment items of a particular feed.

getComments.setOnClickListener(v -> {
   if(commentItems.size()!=0)
       mAdapterCallback.onMethodCallback(commentItems);
});

 

Finally implement the interface in the activity to display the comments dialog fragment populated with the corresponding comments of a feed post. Pass the comments with the help of arraylist through the bundle.

@Override
public void onMethodCallback(List<CommentItem> commentItems) {
   CommentsDialogFragment newFragment = new CommentsDialogFragment();
   Bundle bundle = new Bundle();
   bundle.putParcelableArrayList(ConstantStrings.FACEBOOK_COMMENTS, new ArrayList<>(commentItems));
   newFragment.setArguments(bundle);
   newFragment.show(fragmentManager, "Comments");
}

 

Conclusion

The comments generated with each feed post in the open event android app does complement the feed well. The pagination is something which is an option in the comments and the feed both however that is something for some other time. Until then, keep coding!

Resources

  • StackOverFlow Answer as a reference

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/13733304/callback-to-a-fragment-from-a-dialogfragment

  • Complete code reference

https://github.com/fossasia/open-event-android/pull/1710/files

  • Dialog Fragment Android Official Documentation

https://developer.android.com/reference/android/app/DialogFragment.html

Create an App Widget for Bookmarked Sessions for the Open Event Android App

What is an app widget?

App Widgets are miniature application views that can be embedded in other applications (such as the Home screen) and receive periodic updates. These views are referred to as Widgets in the user interface, and you can publish one with an App Widget provider. – (Android Documentation).

Android widget is an important functionality that any app can take advantage of. It could be used to show important dates, things that the user personalizes on the app etc. In the context of the Open Event Android App, it was necessary to create a bookmark widget for the Android phones so that the user could see his bookmarks on the homescreen itself and need not open the app for the same. In the open event android app, the widget was already created but it needed bug fixes and UI enhancements due to migration to the Realm database migration. Therefore, my majority of work circled around that.

Implementation

Declare the app widget in the manifest. All the updates in the application would be received by the class which extends the AppWidgetProvider if it needs to be reflected in the widget.

<receiver
   android:name=".widget.BookmarkWidgetProvider"
   android:enabled="true"
   android:label="Bookmarks">
   <intent-filter>
       <action android:name="android.appwidget.action.APPWIDGET_UPDATE" />
       <action android:name="${applicationId}.ACTION_DATA_UPDATED" />
       <action android:name="${applicationId}.UPDATE_MY_WIDGET" />
   </intent-filter>
   <meta-data
       android:name="android.appwidget.provider"
       android:resource="@xml/widget_info" />
</receiver>

 

Create a layout for the widget that is to be displayed on the homescreen. Remember to use only the views defined in the documentation. After the creation of the layout, create a custom widget updater which will broadcast the data from the app to the receiver to update the widget.

public class WidgetUpdater {
   public  static  void updateWidget(Context context){
       int widgetIds[] = AppWidgetManager.getInstance(context.getApplicationContext()).getAppWidgetIds(new ComponentName(context.getApplicationContext(), BookmarkWidgetProvider.class));
       BookmarkWidgetProvider bookmarkWidgetProvider = new BookmarkWidgetProvider();
       bookmarkWidgetProvider.onUpdate(context.getApplicationContext(), AppWidgetManager.getInstance(context.getApplicationContext()),widgetIds);
       context.sendBroadcast(new Intent(BookmarkWidgetProvider.ACTION_UPDATE));
   }
}

 

Next, create a custom RemoteViewService to update the views in the widget. The reason this is required is because the app widget does not operate in the usual lifecycle of the app. And therefore a remote service is required which acts as the remote adapter to connect to the remote views. In your class, override the onGetViewFactory() method and create a new remoteViewsFactory object to get the the data from the app on updation of the bookmark list. To populate the remote views, override the getViewsAt() method.

public class BookmarkWidgetRemoteViewsService extends RemoteViewsService {

@Override
public RemoteViewsFactory onGetViewFactory(Intent intent) {

return new RemoteViewsFactory() {
   private MatrixCursor data = null;

   @Override
   public void onCreate() {
       //Called when your factory is first constructed.
   }

   @Override
   public void onDataSetChanged() {
       }

   @Override
   public RemoteViews getViewAt(int position) {
       } 
   }
}

 

Finally, create a custom AppWidgetProvider which parses the relevant fields out of the intent and updates the UI. It acts like a broadcast receiver, hence all the updates by the widgetUpdater is received here.

public class BookmarkWidgetProvider extends AppWidgetProvider {

   public void onUpdate(Context context, AppWidgetManager appWidgetManager, int[] appWidgetIds) {
	  RemoteViews views = new RemoteViews(context.getPackageName(), R.layout.bookmark_widget);
             setRemoteAdapter(context, views);

   }

   @Override
   public void onReceive(@NonNull Context context, @NonNull Intent intent) {
       super.onReceive(context, intent);
   }

   private void setRemoteAdapter(Context context, @NonNull final RemoteViews views) {
       views.setRemoteAdapter(R.id.widget_list,
               new Intent(context, BookmarkWidgetRemoteViewsService.class));
   }

}

 

Conclusion

For any event based apps, it is crucial that it regularly provide updates to its users and therefore app widget forms an integral part of that whole experience.

References

 

 

Using Travis CI to Generate Sample Apks for Testing in Open Event Android

In the Open Event Android app we were using Travis already to push an apk of the Android app to the apk branch for easy testing after each commit in the repo. A better way to test the dynamic nature of the app would be to use the samples of different events from the Open Event repo to generate an apk for each sample. This could help us identify bugs and inconsistencies in the generator and the Android app easily. In this blog I will be talking about how this was implemented using Travis CI.

What is a CI?

Continuous Integration is a DevOps software development practice where developers regularly push their code changes into a central repository. After the merge automated builds and tests are run on the code that has been pushed. This helps developers to identify bugs in code quite easily. There are many CI’s available such as Travis, Codecov etc.

Now that we are all caught up with let’s dive into the code.

Script for replacing a line in a file (configedit.sh)

The main role of this script would be to replace a line in the config.json file. Why do we need this? This would be used to reconfigure the Api_Link in the config.json file according to our build parameters. If we want the apk for Mozilla All Hands 2017 to be built, I would use this  script to replace the Api_Link in the config.json file to the one for Mozilla All Hands 2017.

This is what the config.json file for the app looks like.

{
   "Email": "[email protected]",
   "App_Name": "Open Event",
   "Api_Link": "https://eventyay.com/api/v1/events/6/"
 }

We are going to replace line 4 of this file with

“Api_Link”:”https://raw.githubusercontent.com/fossasia/open-event/master/sample/MozillaAllHands17

VAR=0
 STRING1=$1
 while read line
 do
 ((VAR+=1))
 if [ "$VAR" = 4 ]; then
 echo "$STRING1"
 else
 echo "$line"
 fi
 done < app/src/main/assets/config.json

The script above reads the file line by line. If it reaches line 4 it would print out the string that was given into the script as a parameter else it just prints out the line in the file.

This script would print the required file for us in the terminal if called but NOT create the required file. So we redirect the output of this file into the same file config.json.

Now let’s move on to the main script which is responsible for the building of the apks.

Build Script(generate_apks.sh)

Main components of the script

  • Build the apk for the default sample i.e FOSSASIA17 using the build scripts ./gradlew build and ./gradlew assembleRelease.
  • Store all the Api_Links and apk names for which we need the apks for different arrays
  • Replace the Api_Link in the json file found under android/app/src/main/assets/config.json using the configedit.sh.
  • Run the build scripts ./gradlew build and ./gradlew assembleRelease to generate the apk.
  • Move the generated apk from app/build/outputs/apk/ to a folder called daily where we store all the generated apks.
  • We then repeat this process for the other Api_Links in the array.

As of now we are generating the apks for the following events:

  1. FOSSASIA 17
  2. Mozilla All Hands 17
  3. Google I/O 17
  4. Facebook Developer Conference 17

Care is also taken to avoid all these builds if it is a PR. All the apks are generated only when there is a commit on the development branch i.e when the PR is merged.

Usage of Scripts in .travis.yml

To add Travis integration for the repo we need to include a file named .travis.yml in the repo which indicates Travis CI what to build.

language: android
 ….
 jdk: oraclejdk8
 ….
 before_script:
   - cd android
 script:
   - chmod +x generate_apks.sh
   - chmod +x configedit.sh
   - ./generate_apks.sh
 …..
 after_success:
   - bash <(curl -s https://codecov.io/bash)
   - cd ..
   - chmod +x upload-apk.sh
   - ./upload-apk.sh

In this file we need to define the language for which Travis will build. Here we indicate that it is android. We also specify the jdk version to be used.

Now let’s talk about the other parts of this snippet.

  • before_script : Executes the bash instructions before the travis build starts. Here we do cd android so that we can access gradlew for building the apk.
  • script : This section consists of the instruction to be executed for the build. Here we give executable rights to the two scripts that we have written sh and . Then ./generate_apks is called and the project build starts. All the apks get saved to the folder daily.
  • after_success : This section consists the instructions that are run after the script executes successfully. Here we see that we run a script called sh. This script is responsible of pushing the generated apk files in an orphan branch called apk.

Some points of Interest

  • If the user/developer testing the apk is in the offline state and then comes online there will be database inconsistencies as data from the local assets as well as the data from the Api_Link would appear in the app.
  • When the app generator CLI is ready we can use it to trigger the builds instead of just replacing the Api_Link. This would also be effective in testing the app generator simultaneously.

Now we have everything setup to trigger builds for various samples after each commit.

Resources

Adding Manual ISO Controls in Phimpme Android

The Phimpme Android application comes with a well-featured camera to take high resolution photographs. It features an auto mode in the camera as well as a manual mode for users who likes to customise the camera experience according to their own liking. It provides the users to select from the range of ISO values supported by their devices with a manual mode to enhance the images in case the auto mode fails on certain circumstances such as low lighting conditions.

In this tutorial, I will be discussing how we achieved this in Phimpme Android with some code snippets and screenshots.

To provide the users with an option to select from the range of ISO values, the first thing we need to do is scan the phone for all the supported values of ISO and store it in an arraylist to be used to display later on. This can be done by the snippet provided below:

String iso_values = parameters.get("iso-values");
if( iso_values == null ) {
 iso_values = parameters.get("iso-mode-values"); // Galaxy Nexus
 if( iso_values == null ) {
    iso_values = parameters.get("iso-speed-values"); // Micromax A101
    if( iso_values == null )
       iso_values = parameters.get("nv-picture-iso-values"); // LG dual P990

Every device supports a different set of keyword to provide the list of ISO values. Hence, we have tried to add every possible keywords to extract the values. Some of the keywords used above covers almost 90% of the android devices and gets the set of ISO values successfully.

For the devices which supports the ISO values but doesn’t provide the keyword to extract the ISO values, we can provide the standard list of ISO values manually using the code snippet provided below:

values.add("200");
values.add("400");
values.add("800");
values.add("1600");

After extracting the set of ISO values, we need to create a list to display to the user and upon selection of the particular ISO value as depicted in the Phimpme camera screenshot below

Now to set the selected ISO value, we first need to get the ISO key to set the ISO values as depicted in the code snippet provided below:

if( parameters.get(iso_key) == null ) {
 iso_key = "iso-speed"; // Micromax A101
 if( parameters.get(iso_key) == null ) {
    iso_key = "nv-picture-iso"; // LG dual P990
    if( parameters.get(iso_key) == null ) {
       if ( Build.MODEL.contains("Z00") )
          iso_key = "iso"; // Asus Zenfone 2 Z00A and Z008

Getting the key to set the ISO values is similar to getting the key to extract the ISO values from the device. The above listed ISO keys to set the values covers most of the devices.

Now after we have got the ISO key, we need to change the camera parameter to reflect the selected change.

parameters.set(iso_key, supported_values.selected_value);
setCameraParameters(parameters);

To get the full source code on how to set the ISO values manually, please refer to the Phimpme Android repository.

Resources

  1. Stackoverflow – Keywords to extract ISO values from the device: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2978095/android-camera-api-iso-setting
  2. Open camera Android source code: https://sourceforge.net/p/opencamera/code/ci/master/tree/
  3. Blog – Learn more about ISO values in photography: https://photographylife.com/what-is-iso-in-photography

Adding Event Overview Route in Open Event Frontend

In Open Event Frontend we have an event overview route which is like a mini dashboard for an event where information regarding event sponsors, general info, roles, tickets, event setup etc. is present. All of the information is present in their corresponding components and this dashboard is made up of those components. To create this dashboard we will first create its components.

To create a component we will use following ember command-

ember -g component <component-name>

This command will give us three files: a template, a component and a test file corresponding to that component. We will use this command to generate all our components.

Now let’s discuss each component separately and see how many of them are combined to form this route-

The event-setup-checklist component contains semantic ui’s steps to maintain checklist of basic-details, sponsors, session & microlocation, call for speakers, session and speakers form customization so that it becomes easy to identify which step is complete and which is not.

Next is general-info component which shows basic information about an event like start-time, end-time, location, number of speakers, number of sponsors etc. It also shows whether the event is live or not.

In manage-roles component, manage the role for a given person, add people and assign different roles to them, edit roles for different people. Also we can see who are invited for a given role and who accepted them.

In event-sponsors component we manage the sponsors for the event, edit an existing sponsor, add a new sponsor with their logo, name, type and level. Also we can delete an existing sponsor.

Next is the ticket component which displays the details of number of orders, number of tickets sold, and total sales. Also it displays the number of types of tickets are sold.

Next is our app-component which has two choices. First is to generate android app for the event and second is to generate webapp of the event.

And finally in our view.index template, we add these components using ui stackable grid layout. Whenever we want to conditionally show or hide a component, we can do that in our event.index template and hence it becomes very easy to manage huge amounts content on a single page.

Resources

File Upload Validations on Open Event Frontend

In Open Event Frontend we have used semantics ui’s form validations to validate different fields of a form. There are certain instances in our app where the user has to upload a file and it is to be validated against the suggested format before uploading it to the server. Here we will discuss how to perform the validation.

Semantics ui allows us to validate by facilitating pass of an object along with rules for its validation. For fields like email and contact number we can pass type as email and number respectively but for validation of file we have to pass a regular expression with allowed extension.The following walks one through the process.

fields : {
  file: {
    identifier : 'file',
    rules      : [
      {
        type   : 'empty',
        prompt : this.l10n.t('Please upload a file')
      },
      {
        type   : 'regExp',
        value  : '/^(.*.((zip|xml|ical|ics|xcal)$))?[^.]*$/i',
        prompt : this.l10n.t('Please upload a file in suggested format')
      }
    ]
  }
}

Here we have passed file element (which is to be validated) inside our fields object identifier, which for this field is ‘file’, and can be identified by its id, name or data-validate property of the field element. After that we have passed an array of rules against which the field element is validated. First rule gives an error message in the prompt field in case of an empty field.

The next rule checks for allowed file extensions for the file. The type of the rule will be regExp as we are passing a regular expression which is as follows-

/^(.*.((zip|xml|ical|ics|xcal)$))?[^.]*$/i

It is little complex to explain it from the beginning so let us breakdown it from end-

 

$ Matches end of the string
[^.]* Negated set. Match any character not in this set. * represents 0 or more preceding token
( … )? Represents if there is something before (the last ?)
.*.((zip|xml|ical|ics|xcal)$) This is first capturing group ,it contains tocken which are combined to create a capture group ( zip|xml|ical|ics|xcal ) to extract a substring
^ the beginning of the string

Above regular expression filters all the files with zip/xml/ical/xcal extensions which are the allowed format for the event source file.

References

  • Ivaylo Gerchev blog on form validation in semantic ui
  • Drmsite blog on semantic ui form validation
  • Semantic ui form validation docs
  • Stackoverflow regex for file extension

Using Picasso to Show Images in SUSI Android

Important skills of SUSI.AI are to display web search queries, maps of any location and provide a list of relevant information of a topic. This blog post will cover why Glide is replaced by Picasso to show images related to these action types and how it is implemented in SUSI AndroidPicasso is a powerful image downloading and caching open source library developed by Square.

Why Glide is replaced by Picasso to show images in SUSI Android?

Previously we used Glide library to show preview in SUSI Android but we replace it because it was creating an error continuously.

java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: You cannot start a load for a destroyed activity at com.bumptech.glide.manager.RequestManagerRetriever  at Com.bumptech.glide.manager.RequestManagerRetriever.get(RequestManagerRetriever.java:102) at com.bumptech.glide.manager.RequestManagerRetriever.get(RequestManagerRetriever.java:87)at com.bumptech.glide.Glide.with(Glide.java:629)
atnorg.fossasia.susi.ai.adapters.recycleradapters.WebSearchAdapter.onBindViewHolder(WebSearchAdapter.java:74)

Reason for this error is when activity destroyed and again recreated the context used by glide is old one and  that activity already destroyed .

Glide.with(context).load(imageList.get(0))

One solution of this error is to use context.getApplicationContext()  but it is a bad idea. Another solution is to replace glide by picasso and later one is good because picasso is also a very good image downloading and caching library.

To use Picasso in your project you have to add dependency in build.gradle(Module) file.

dependencies {
  
  compile “com.squareup.picasso:picasso:2.4.0”
  
}

How Picasso is used in different actiontype

Map

“actions”: [
     {
       “type”: “map”,
       “latitude”: “1.2896698812440377”,
       “longitude”: “103.85006683126556”,
       “zoom”: “13”
     }
   ]

Link we used to retrieve image url is

http://staticmap.openstreetmap.de/statucmap.php?center=latitude,longitude& zoom=zoom&size=lengthXbreadth

Picasso will load image from this url and show image in the imageview. Here mapImage is the imageview in which map image is shown.

Picasso.with(currContext).load(mapHelper.getMapURL())
                       .into(mapImage, new  com.squareup.picasso.Callback() {    
                           @Override
                           public void onSuccess() {
                               pointer.setVisibility(View.VISIBLE);
                           }
                           @Override
                           public void onError() {
                               Log.d(“Error”, “map image can’t loaded”);
                           }
                       });

WebSearch

When we query like “Search for fog” we get ‘query’ in reply from server

“query”: “fog”

Now we use this query to retrieve image url which we used in Picasso to show images.Picasso load this image into previewImageView imageview. Image url is retrieved using  DuckDuckGo api. We are using url

https://api.duckduckgo.com/?format=json&pretty=1&q=query&ia=meanings

It gives a json response which contains image url

Picasso.with(context).load(iconUrl)
      .into(holder.previewImageView, new  com.squareup.picasso.Callback() {
                  @Override
                   public void onSuccess() {
                         Log.d(“Sucess”,“image loaded successfully”);
                   }
                   @Override
                   public void onError() {
                       holder.previewImageView.setVisibility(View.GONE);
                     }
                });     

Here also com.squareup.picasso.Callback is use to find that image is loaded successfully or not.

RSS

When we query any like “dhoni” we get ‘link’ in reply from server

“title”: “Dhoni”,

“description”: “”,
“link”: “http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dhoni”

We use this link in android-link-preview library to retrieve relevant image url and then Picasso use this url to load image into imageview previewImageView.

Picasso.with(currContext).load(imageList.get(0))
      .fit().centerCrop()
      .into(previewImageView);

Reference

Sorting Photos in Phimpme Android

The Phimpme Android application features a fully fledged gallery interface with an option to switch to all photos mode, albums mode and to sort photos according to various sort actions. Sorting photos via various options helps the user to get to the desired photo immediately without having to scroll down till the end in case it is the last photo in the list generated automatically by scanning the phone for images using the Android’s mediaStore class. In this tutorial, I will be discussing how we achieved the sorting option in the Phimpme application with the help of some code snippets.

To sort the all photos list, first of all we need a list of all the photos by scanning the phone using the media scanner class via the code snippet provided below:

uri = android.provider.MediaStore.Images.Media.EXTERNAL_CONTENT_URI;
      String[] projection = {MediaStore.MediaColumns.DATA};
      cursor = activity.getContentResolver().query(uri, projection, null, null, null);

In the above code we are using a cursor to point to each photos and then we are extracting the path of the images and storing it in a list using a while loop. After we generate the list of path of all the images, we have to convert the into a list of media using the file path using the code below:

for (String path : listOfAllImages) {
          list.add(new Media(new File(path)));
      }
      return list;
  }

After generating the list of all images we can sort the photos using the Android’s collection class. In Phimpme Android we provide the option to sort photos in different categories namely:

  1. Name Sort action
  2. Date Sort action
  3. Size Sort action
  4. Numeric Sort action

As sorting is somewhat heavy task so doing this in the main thread will result in freezing UI of the application so we have to put this into an AsyncTask with a progress dialog to sort the photos. After putting the above four options in the menu options. We can define an Asynctask to load the images and in the onPreExecute method of the AsyncTask, we are displaying the progress dialog to the user to depict that the sorting process is going on as depicted in the code snippet below

AlertDialog.Builder progressDialog = new AlertDialog.Builder(LFMainActivity.this, getDialogStyle());
dialog = AlertDialogsHelper.getProgressDialog(LFMainActivity.this, progressDialog,
      getString(R.string.loading_numeric), all_photos ? getString(R.string.loading_numeric_all) : getAlbum().getName());
dialog.show();

In the doInBackgroundMethod of the AsyncTask, we are sorting the list of all photos using the Android’s collection class and using the static sort method defined in that class which takes the list of all the media files as a parameter and the MediaComparator which takes the sorting mode as the first parameter and the sorting order as the second. The sorting order decides whether to arrange the list in ascending or in descending order.

getAlbum().setDefaultSortingMode(getApplicationContext(), NUMERIC);
Collections.sort(listAll, MediaComparators.getComparator(getAlbum().settings.getSortingMode(), getAlbum().settings.getSortingOrder()));

After sorting, we have to update the data set to reflect the changes of the list in the UI. This we are doing in the onPostExecute method of the AsyncTask after dismissing the progress Dialog to avoid the window leaks in the application. You can read more about the window leaks in Android due to progressdialog here.

dialog.dismiss();
mediaAdapter.swapDataSet(listAll);

To get the full source code, you can refer the Phimpme Android repository listed in the resources below.

Resources

  1. Android developer guide to mediastore class: https://developer.android.com/reference/android/provider/MediaStore.html
  2. GitHub LeafPic repository: https://github.com/HoraApps/LeafPic
  3. Stackoverflow – Preventing window leaks in Android: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/6614692/progressdialog-how-to-prevent-leaked-window
  4. Blog – Sorting lists in Android: http://www.worldbestlearningcenter.com/tips/Android-sort-ListView.htm