Communicate between Child and Parent Components in React JS of SUSI Web Chat

When we were developing SUSI AI web chat  some components became huge. So the team wanted to break some components into parts. Since the Login dialog-box is used in several  places we decided to make a separate component for Login Dialog-box. In this post I am discussing how we implemented the feature as a separate component and how we have changed the state of the parent component of the child component.

Login Dialog-box contains all the things of the login dialog-box component.

Child-component (Login Dialog-box component) is here:

This method executes the ‘switchDialog’ function of the parent component.

export default class LoginDialog extends React.Component {

   handleClose = () => {
      this.props.switchDialog(false);
   };

   render() {
       this.state = { open: this.props.open }
       const actions = <RaisedButton
           label="Cancel"
           backgroundColor={
               UserPreferencesStore.getTheme() === 'light' ? '#607D8B' : '#19314B'}
           labelColor="#fff"
           width='200px'
           keyboardFocused={true}
           onTouchTap={this.handleClose}
       />;

       return (
           <Dialog
               actions={actions}
               modal={false}
               open={this.props.open}
               autoScrollBodyContent={true}
               bodyStyle={bodyStyle}
               contentStyle={{ width: '35%', minWidth: '300px' }}
               onRequestClose={this.handleClose}>
               <Login {...this.props} />
           </Dialog>
       );
   }

};

In this part we validate property types that has passed from the parent component.

LoginDialog.propTypes = {
   open: PropTypes.bool,
   switchDialog: PropTypes.func
};

In render() method I have returned the element.
To open and close dialog we have to communicate with parent component. We can send an instruction as an attribute of the element and we can refer it inside the element as “props”. This is how I have sent an instruction to the child element.
Parent-component:
‘handleOpen’ function opens the dialog when user hit on the login button.

   handleOpen = () => {
       this.setState({ open: true });
   };

‘switchDialog’ function is using for change the state of parent component from child Component (Login Dialog-box component).

   switchDialog=(dialogState)=>{
       this.setState({open:dialogState});
   };

   render() {

       const styles = {
           'margin': '60px auto',
           'width': '100%',
           'padding': '20px',
           'textAlign': 'center'
       }

       return (
           <div className="signUpForm">
               <Paper zDepth={1} style={styles}>
                   <h1>Sign Up with SUSI</h1>
                   <form onSubmit={this.handleSubmit}>
                       <div>
                           <h4>If you have an Account Please Login</h4>
                           <RaisedButton
                               onTouchTap={this.handleOpen}
                               label='Login'
                               backgroundColor={
                                   UserPreferencesStore.getTheme()==='light'
                                   ? '#607D8B' : '#19314B'}
                               labelColor="#fff" />
                       </div>
                   </form>
               </Paper>

               <LoginDialog {...this.props} open={this.state.open} switchDialog={this.switchDialog} />
           </div>
       );
   };

To open and close the dialog-box we have to send the state of the parent component to child component. To close the dialog-box we have to update the parent component’s state from child component.

To change the parent component’s state we have used this in element.

switchDialog={this.switchDialog}

To send the state to the child component we used this.

open={this.state.open}

To send other properties to the element we used this.

{...this.props}

After closing the dialog-box it calls this method and it updates the state of the parent component.

handleClose = () => {
      this.props.switchDialog(false);
};

This is how we can communicate between child and parent components using react.

Resources:

Component Communication: http://andrewhfarmer.com/component-communication/
Material UI Dialogs: http://www.material-ui.com/#/components/dialog

Using Vector Images in SUSI Android

SUSI is an artificial intelligence for interactive chat bots. For making it more user friendly and interactive we add a lot of images in the form of drawable resources in the SUSI Android App (https://github.com/fossasia/susi_android). Most of these drawables are in the form of PNGs. There are certain problems associated with the use of PNG images.

  1. PNGs cannot be scaled without losing quality. Due to which for the same PNG image we have to include separate images of varied quality. Otherwise the image will become blur.
  2. PNGs tends to take large disk space which can be easily reduced with the use of vector images.
  3. PNGs have fixed color and dimensions which cannot be changed.

Due to the above shortcomings of PNG images we decided to use vector drawable images instead of them.

Advantages associated with Vector images

  1. They can be scaled to any size without the loss in quality. Thus we need to include only a single image in the app and not of varied qualities.
  2. They are very small in size as compared to PNGs.
  3. They can be easily modified programmatically in XML file unlike PNGs.

Using Vector Images in Android Studio

Android Studio provide tools by which we can directly import vector drawables in the project. To import Vector images go to File>New>Vector Assets in studio.

From here we can choose the icon we want to include in our project and click OK. The icon will appear in the drawables directory and can be used anywhere in the projects.

Implementation in SUSI Android

In Susi Android we have used various vector images such as arrows, pointer and even the logo of the app. Here below is the logo of SUSI.

This is actually a vector image below we will see the code required to get this logo as the output.

<vector android:height="50dp" android:viewportHeight="279.37604"

  android:viewportWidth="1365.2" android:width="220dp" xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android">

<path android:fillColor="#ffffff"

      android:pathData="M127.5,7.7c-26.8,3.3 -54.2,16.8 -75.9,37.4 -11.8,11.1 -20.4,22.9 -28.1,38.4 -8.9,17.8 -12.8,32.1 -13.7,51l-0.3,6 39,0 39,0 0.3,-4c0.7,-12.1 6.8,-24.1 17.2,-34.5 8.5,-8.4 16.2,-13.4 25.9,-16.7l6.6,-2.2 81.3,-0.1 81.2,0 0,-38 0,-38 -84.7,0.1c-46.7,0.1 -86.1,0.4 -87.8,0.6z" android:strokeColor="#00000000"/>

  <path android:fillColor="#ffffff"

      android:pathData="M319.2,11.3l-4.3,4.3 0.3,103c0.4,113.2 0,105.9 6.4,118.6 10.8,21.3 35.1,41.9 56.2,47.3 8.5,2.3 99.1,2.2 107.7,0 18.7,-4.9 39.2,-20.7 51.5,-39.7 3.4,-5.1 7.1,-12.2 8.3,-15.8l2.2,-6.5 0.5,-103.3 0.5,-103.3 -4.5,-4.4 -4.6,-4.5 -31.5,0 -31.5,0 -4.7,4.8 -4.7,4.8 0,93 0,93 -3.3,3.2 -3.3,3.2 -29,0 -29,0 -2.6,-2.7 -2.7,-2.8 -0.7,-94.2 -0.7,-94.2 -4.3,-4 -4.2,-4.1 -31.9,0 -31.9,0 -4.2,4.3z" android:strokeColor="#00000000"/>

  <path android:fillColor="#ffffff"

      android:pathData="M680,7.6c-31.6,4.8 -56.1,17.3 -79,40.3 -23.2,23.3 -36.3,50.5 -38.9,80.9 -0.5,5.9 -0.7,11 -0.4,11.4 0.2,0.5 17.7,0.8 38.8,0.8l38.4,0 0.6,-4.8c3.2,-23.2 21.3,-44.1 44.7,-51.3 5.6,-1.8 10.6,-1.9 86.6,-1.9l80.7,0 -0.3,-38 -0.2,-38 -84.3,0.1c-46.3,0.1 -85.3,0.3 -86.7,0.5z" android:strokeColor="#00000000"/>

  <path android:fillColor="#ffffff"

      android:pathData="M869.1,13.4l-4.1,6.4 0,126.4 0,126.3 4.8,6.7 4.7,6.8 31.6,0 31.6,0 4.7,-7 4.6,-7 0,-125.7 0,-125.8 -4.7,-6.7 -4.8,-6.8 -32.1,0 -32.1,0 -4.2,6.4z" android:strokeColor="#00000000"/>

  <path android:fillColor="#ffffff"

      android:pathData="M222.5,152.2c-0.2,0.7 -0.9,4.2 -1.5,7.7 -3.4,19.5 -19.4,38 -40,46.4l-5.5,2.2 -83,0.5 -83,0.5 -0.3,37.8 -0.2,37.8 89.2,-0.3 89.3,-0.3 9.6,-2.7c57.7,-16.3 100.1,-67.4 102.1,-123.3l0.3,-7 -38.3,-0.3c-30.1,-0.2 -38.3,0 -38.7,1z" android:strokeColor="#00000000"/>

  <path android:fillColor="#ffffff"

      android:pathData="M774.5,152.2c-0.2,0.7 -0.9,4.1 -1.5,7.5 -3.3,19.2 -18.8,37.3 -39.4,46.2l-6.1,2.6 -83,0.5 -83,0.5 -0.3,37.7 -0.2,37.8 85.9,0c93.7,0 91.4,0.1 110.1,-5.9 26.4,-8.5 53.3,-28.4 69.8,-51.7 15.2,-21.3 25.1,-50.1 24,-69.9l-0.3,-6 -37.8,-0.3c-29.7,-0.2 -37.8,0 -38.2,1z" android:strokeColor="#00000000"/>

  <path android:fillColor="#ffffff" android:pathData="m1146.99,0 l-1.38,1.19c-0.76,0.66 -1.85,1.61 -2.43,2.13 -0.58,0.51 -1.75,1.54 -2.61,2.28 -1.52,1.31 -1.58,1.41 -2.4,3.53 -0.46,1.2 -0.92,2.37 -1.01,2.59 -30.55,82.93 -61.62,165.72 -96.03,259.63 0,0.08 1.61,1.88 3.57,3.98l3.57,3.84 33.47,-0.04 33.47,-0.04c12.28,-35.6 25.13,-72.47 37.4,-107.27 0.06,-0.25 0.28,-0.64 0.5,-0.88 0.37,-0.41 0.61,-0.43 4.2,-0.43 3.63,0 3.83,0.02"/>

  <path android:fillColor="#ffffff" android:pathData="m967.09,279.18c-2.48,-3.74 -4.97,-7.04 -8.09,-11.76l0.09,-43.92c3.34,-5.26 5.31,-6.73 8.42,-11.51 17.91,0.02 34.3,0.26 50.88,0.26 3.21,4.88 4.09,6.72 7.81,12.66 -0.05,13.98 0.1,27.96 -0.12,41.94 -2.9,4.2 -4.27,7.42 -7.78,12.18 -18.81,-0.04 -35.43,0.2 -51.21,0.15z"/>

  <path android:fillColor="#ffffff"

      android:pathData="m1287.3,6.59 l-4.1,6.4 0,126.4 0,126.3 4.8,6.7 4.7,6.8 31.6,0 31.6,0 4.7,-7 4.6,-7 0,-125.7 0,-125.8 -4.7,-6.7 -4.8,-6.8 -32.1,0 -32.1,0 -4.2,6.4z" android:strokeColor="#00000000"/>


</vector>

In this code we can easily change the color and minor details for the logo which could have been not possible if the logo was in PNG format. Also we don’t need multiple logo images of varied qualities as it can be scaled without decreasing quality.

Resources

Addition of Bookmarks to the Homescreen in the Open Event Android App

In the Open Event Android app we had already built the new homescreen but the users only had access to bookmarks in a separate page which could be accessed from the navbar.If the bookmarks section were to be incorporated in the homescreen itself, it would definitely improve its access to the user. In this blog post, I’ll be talking about how this was done in the app.

These 2 images show the homescreen and the bookmarks section respectively.

No Bookmark View
Bookmark View

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This was the proposed homescreen page for the app. This would provide easy access to important stuff to the user such as event venue,date,description etc. Also the same homescreen would also have the bookmarks showing at the top if there are any.

The list of bookmarks in the first iteration of design was modeled to be a horizontal list of cards.

Bookmarks Merging Process

These are some variables for reference.

private SessionsListAdapter sessionsListAdapter;
 private RealmResults<Session> bookmarksResult;
 private List<Session> mSessions = new ArrayList<>();

The code snippet below highlights the initial setup of the bookmarks recycler view for the horizontal List of cards. All of this is being done in the onCreateView callback of the AboutFragment.java file which is the fragment file for the homescreen.

bookmarksRecyclerView.setVisibility(View.VISIBLE);
 sessionsListAdapter = new SessionsListAdapter(getContext(), mSessions, bookmarkedSessionList);
 sessionsListAdapter.setBookmarkView(true);
 bookmarksRecyclerView.setAdapter(sessionsListAdapter);
 bookmarksRecyclerView.setLayoutManager(new LinearLayoutManager(getContext(),LinearLayoutManager.HORIZONTAL,false));

The SessionListAdapter is an adapter that was built to handle multiple types of displays of the same viewholder i.e SessionViewHolder . This SessionListAdapter is given a static variable as an argument which is just notifies the adapter to switch to the bookmarks mode for the adapter.

private void loadData() {
    bookmarksResult = realmRepo.getBookMarkedSessions();
    bookmarksResult.removeAllChangeListeners();
    bookmarksResult.addChangeListener((bookmarked, orderedCollectionChangeSet) -> {
        mSessions.clear();
        mSessions.addAll(bookmarked);
 
        sessionsListAdapter.notifyDataSetChanged();
 
        handleVisibility();
    });
 }

This function loadData() is responsible for extracting the sessions that are bookmarked from the local Realm database. We the update the BookmarkAdapter on the homescreen with the list of the bookmarks obtained. Here we see that a ChangeListener is being attached to our RealmResults. This is being done so that we do our adapter notify only after the data of the bookmarked sessions has been processed from a background thread.

if(bookmarksResult != null)
    bookmarksResult.removeAllChangeListeners();

And it is good practice to remove any ChangeListeners that we attach during the fragment life cycle in the onStop() method to avoid memory leaks.

So now we have successfully added bookmarks to the homescreen.

Resources

Using react-slick for Populating RSS Feeds in SUSI Chat

To populate SUSI RSS Feed generated, while chatting on SUSI Web Chat, I needed a Horizontal Swipeable Tile Slider. For this purpose, I made use of the package react-slick. The information which was supposed to be handled as obtained from the SUSI Server to populate the RSS feed was

  • Title
  • Description
  • Link

Hence to show all of this information like a horizontal scrollable feed, tiles by react-slick solves the purpose. To achieve the same, let’s see follow the steps below.

  1. First step is to install the react-slick package into our project folder, for that we use
npm install react-slick --save
  1. Next we import the Slider component from react-slick package into the file where we want the slider, here MessageListItem.react.js
import Slider from 'react-slick'
  1. Add Slider with settings as given in the docs. This is totally customisable. For more customisable options go to https://github.com/akiran/react-slick
var settings = {
         speed: 500,
         slidesToShow: 3,
         slidesToScroll: 1,
        swipeToSlide:true,
         swipe:true,
         arrows:false
     };

speed – The Slider will scroll horizontally with this speed.

slidesToShow – The number of slides to populate in one visible screen

swipeToSlide, swipe – Enable swiping on touch screen devices.

arrows – Put false, to disable arrows

  1. The next step is to initialize the Slider component inside the render function and populate it with the tiles. The full code snippet is available at MessageListItem.react.js
<Slider {..settings}>//Append the settings which you created
    {yourListToProps} // Add the list tiles you want to see
</Slider>
  1. Adding a little bit of styling, full code available in ChatApp.css
 .slick-slide{
 margin: 0 10px;
}
.slick-list{
  max-height: 100px;
}
  1. This is the output you would get in your screen.

  • Note – To prevent errors like the following on testing with jest, you will have to add the following lines into the code.

Error log, which one may encounter while using react-slick –

 matchMedia not present, legacy browsers require a polyfill

  at Object.MediaQueryDispatch (node_modules/enquire.js/dist/enquire.js:226:19)
  at node_modules/enquire.js/dist/enquire.js:291:9
  at i (node_modules/enquire.js/dist/enquire.js:11:20)
  at Object.<anonymous> (node_modules/enquire.js/dist/enquire.js:21:2)
  at Object.<anonymous> (node_modules/react-responsive-mixin/index.js:2:28)
  at Object.<anonymous> (node_modules/react-slick/lib/slider.js:19:29)
  at Object.<anonymous> (node_modules/react-slick/lib/index.js:3:18)
  at Object.<anonymous> (src/components/Testimonials.jsx:3:45)
  at Object.<anonymous> (src/pages/Index.jsx:7:47)
  at Object.<anonymous> (src/App.jsx:8:40)
  at Object.<anonymous> (src/App.test.jsx:3:38)
  at process._tickCallback (internal/process/next_tick.js:103:7)

In package.json, add the following lines-

"peerDependencies": {
      "react": "^0.14.0 || ^15.0.1",
      "react-dom": "^0.14.0 || ^15.0.1"
    },
   "jest": {
      "setupFiles": ["./src/setupTests.js", "./src/node_modules/react-scripts/config/polyfills.js"]
   },

In src/setupTests.js, add the following lines.

window.matchMedia = window.matchMedia || (() => { return { matches: false, addListener: () => {}, removeListener: () => {}, }; });

These lines will help resolve any occurring errors while testing with Jest or ESLint.

To have a look at the full project, visit https://github.com/fossasia/chat.susi.ai and feel free to contribute. To test the project visit http://chat.susi.ai

Resources

 

Implementing Login Functionality in SUSI Web Chat

SUSI Web Chat is fully equipped with all the accounting features which are being provided by the SUSI.AI API. This blog discloses all the API features one needs to know to embed the Login functionality in SUSI Web Chat.

  1. To embed the Login feature, first we create a form using material-ui.com components with the followng fields
    1. Email
    2. Password
    3. Note: We can also chose a Custom Server while logging in, here I have used the Standard Server ie. http://api.susi.ai to make the user Login

The form can be made with the help of the following fields

  • TextField for Email, props to be passed
    • Name – email
    • Value – this.state.email which gets the value of the current email
    • floatingLabelText is Email,
    • errorText is the message which we want to show when the email does not match the regex or its empty.

Code Snippet –

<TextField name="email" value={this.state.email} onChange={this.handleChange} errorText={this.emailErrorMessage}    floatingLabelText="Email" />
  • PasswordField for Password
    • Name – password
    • Value – this.state.password which gets the value of the current email
    • floatingLabelText is Password,
    • errorText is the message which we want to show when the password is not filled.

Code Snippet-

<PasswordField name='password' value={this.state.password} onChange={this.handleChange} errorText={this.passwordErrorMessage}   floatingLabelText='Password' />
  • The next elements are RadioButton groups taken from material-ui.com. This ensures the user signs into a standard server or even to a custom server. This is not compulsory as of now.
  • And lastly we need a submit button, which is disabled until all the fields are filled.

Code Snippet –

<RaisedButton label="Login" type="submit" labelColor="#fff" disable={!this.state.validForm} />

For the full form, check out this file at Login.react.js

  1. A Sample UI could be as shown in the image
  2. Next after creating the Login Screen, we make the onSubmit prop which is to be hooked up with another function called handleSubmit. An example code snippet from Login.react.js
 handleSubmit = (e) => {
        e.preventDefault();
        // Get the trimmed values from the fields
        var email = this.state.email.trim();
        var password = this.state.password.trim();
        // Set the default server to login
        let BASE_URL = defaults.Server;
            // handle all the details of the chosen server
        let serverUrl = this.state.serverUrl;
        if(serverUrl.slice(-1) === '/'){
            serverUrl = serverUrl.slice(0,-1);
        }
        if(serverUrl !== ''){
            BASE_URL = serverUrl;
        }
// if email and password is filled return true
        if (!email || !password) { return this.state.isFilled; }
// Check the regex of email
        let validEmail = /^[A-Z0-9._%+-]+@[A-Z0-9.-]+\.[A-Z]{2,4}$/i.test(email); 
// Pass the parameters to the loginEndPoint
        let loginEndPoint =
            BASE_URL+'/aaa/login.json?type=access-token&login=' +
            this.state.email + '&password=' + this.state.password;
        // If email and password is filled and valid call AJAX
        if (email && validEmail) {
            // AJAX Calls
        }
    }
    1. Then we make the Ajax Calls and store the created token from hitting the URL at http://api.susi.ai/aaa/login.json?type=access-token&login=EMAIL&password=PASSWORD. We store the cookie in browser and generate a session for the user using a package ‘universal-cookies’.
$.ajax({
    url: loginEndPoint,
    dataType: 'jsonp',
    jsonpCallback: 'p',
    jsonp: 'callback',
    crossDomain: true,
    success: function (response) {
        cookies.set('serverUrl', BASE_URL, { path: '/' });
        let accessToken = response.access_token;
        let state = this.state;// Adding the current State
        let time = response.valid_seconds; // Get the valid time of the cookie
        state.isFilled = true; // Set isFilled to true
        state.accessToken = accessToken; // Get the token
        state.success = true; // Set Success to true
        state.msg = response.message; // Get the server message
        state.time = time; // Get the time in the state
        this.setState(state); // Set the  state with the values
/* Pass the token to the binding function handleOnSubmit passing the arguments - token and the valid time */
        this.handleOnSubmit(accessToken, time);
    }.bind(this),
    error: function (errorThrown) {
        let msg = 'Login Failed. Try Again';
        let state = this.state;
        state.msg = msg;
        this.setState(state);
    }.bind(this)
});

 

    1. We then fire up the handleOnSubmit(accessToken, time) which saves the token for the given expiration time from the server.

Here’s the sample code

handleOnSubmit = (loggedIn, time) => {
        let state = this.state;
        if (state.success) {
            cookies.set('loggedIn', loggedIn, { path: '/', maxAge: time }); // set the cookie in the browser to maintain the loggedIn state
            this.props.history.push('/', { showLogin: false });
            window.location.reload();// reload after the loggedIn cookie creation
        }
        else {
            this.setState({
                error: true,
                accessToken: '',
                success: false
            });
        }
    }
  1. We then check the access token and redirect him based on his login state. This is handled in MessageSection.react.js
import Cookies from 'universal-cookie';
const cookies = new Cookies();
if (cookies.get('loggedIn')) {
    //Show all functionalities of loggedIn state
}
else {
//Redirect user to login page
}

 

To have a look at the full project, visit https://github.com/fossasia/chat.susi.ai and feel free to contribute. To test the project visit http://chat.susi.ai

Resources

Using Semantic UI Modals in Open Event Frontend

Modals in semantic UI are used to display the content on the current view while temporarily blocking the interaction with the main view. In Open Event Frontend application, we’ve a ‘delete’ button which deletes the published event as soon as the button is pressed making all the data clean. Once the event is deleted by the user, it is not possible to restore it again. We encountered that this can create a whole lot of problem if the button is pressed unintentionally. So we thought of solving this by popping up a dialog box on button click with a warning and asking for user’s confirmation to delete the event. To implement the dialog box, we used semantic UI modals which helped in ensuring that the user correctly enters the name of the event in the given space to ensure that s/he wants to delete the event.

Since we want our modal to be customizable yet reusable so that it can be used anywhere in the project so we made it as the component called ‘event-delete-modal’. To do that we first need to start with the template.

The markup for the event-delete-modal looks like this:

<div class="content">
  <form class="ui form" autocomplete="off" {{action (optional formSubmit) on='submit' preventDefault=true}}>
    <div class="field">
      <div class="label">
        {{t 'Please enter the full name of the event to continue'}}
      </div>
      {{input type='text' name='confirm_name' value=confirmName required=true}}
    </div>
  </form>
</div>
<div class="actions">
  <button type="button" class="ui black button" {{action 'close'}}>
    {{t 'Cancel'}}
  </button>
  <button type="submit" class="ui red button" disabled={{isNameDifferent}} {{action deleteEvent}}>
    {{t 'Delete Event'}}
  </button>
</div>

The complete code for the template can be seen here.

The above code for the modal window is very similar to the codes which we write for creating the main window. We can see that the semantic UI collection “form” has also been used here for creating the form where the user can input the name of the event along with delete and cancel buttons. The delete button remains disabled until the time correct name of the event been written by the user to ensure that user really wants to delete the event. To cancel the modal we have used close callback method of semantic UI modal which itself closes it. Since the ‘isNameDifferent’ action is uniquely associated to this particular modal hence it’s been declared in the ‘event-delete-modal.js’ file.

The code for the  ‘isNameDifferent’ in ‘event-delete-modal.js’ file looks like this.

export default ModalBase.extend({
  isSmall         : true,
  confirmName     : '',
  isNameDifferent : computed('confirmName', function() {
    return this.get('confirmName').toLowerCase() !== this.get('eventName').toLowerCase();
  })
});

The complete code for the.js file can be seen here.

In the above piece of code, we have isSmall variable to ensure that our modal size is small so it can fit for all screen sizes and we have the implementation isNameDifferent() function. We can also notice that our modal is extending the ‘ModelBase’ class which has all the semantic UI modal settings and the callback methods to perform show, hide, close and open actions along with settings which will help modal to look the way we want it to be.  

The modal-base.js class looks like this.

  openObserver: observer('isOpen', function() {
   close() {
     this.set('isOpen', false);
   },
   actions: {
    close() {
      this.close();
    }
  },
  willInitSemantic(settings) {
    const defaultOptions = {
      detachable     : false,
      duration       : testing ? 0 : 200,
      dimmerSettings : {
        dimmerName : `${this.get('elementId')}-modal-dimmer`,
        variation  : 'inverted'
      },
      onHide: () => {
        this.set('isOpen', false);
        if (this.get('onHide')) {
          this.onHide();
        }
      },
      onVisible: () => {
        this.set('isOpen', true);
        this.$('[data-content]').popup({
          inline: true
        });
     }

The complete code for the .js file can be seen here.

In the above code, we can see that at the top we’ve an ‘openObserver’ function where we’re observing the behaviour of the modal and setting the variables according to the behavioural changes. Now, later we’re checking the status of those variables and performing the actions based on their value. For example, to close the modal we have a boolean variable ‘isOpen’ which is set to false now close() action will be called which closes the modal.  Similarly, in ‘willInitSemantic(settings)’ function we’re setting the modal’s setting like the effects, length, the details modal will display on popping out etc.
We’re here overriding the semantic UI moda settings like detachable, dimmerSettings, duration etc along with the callback methods like onHide(), onVisible() etc. to get the required results.

Finally, our event-delete-modal will look something like this.

Fig: Modal to delete the event

So to conclude this post, we can easily say that the modals are of great use. They can solve the purpose of displaying some alert or to input some values without interrupting the flow of the main page depending upon the requirements.

Additional Resources:

Blog post about Awesome Ember.js Form Components of Alex Speller: http://alexspeller.com/simple-forms-with-ember/

Declaring Ember Data Model Defaults in Open Event Frontend

This article will illustrate the ways to declare the model defaults for JavaScript data types ‘boolean’, ‘string’, ‘number’, ‘object’ and ‘array’ as used in Open Event frontend project.

While working with ember-data models which define the properties and behaviour of data, in Open Event frontend project, we needed to preset the values for certain attributes if they are not supplied along with data. To preset the values in ember-data we need to specify the default values to the attribute. The process of setting the default values is very much similar to the way we handle it in other databases like MySQL and we might have certainly done it many times there. In ember, we set the values like this.

export default Model.extend({
 type : attr('string', { defaultValue: 'text' }),
 isRequired : attr('boolean', { defaultValue: false })
});


This way we could set values for attributes having data types, ‘boolean’, ‘string’ and ‘number’. But when it came to data types, ‘object’ and ‘array’ we were unable to set the default values in similar way reason being ember data does not provide support for ‘array’ and ‘object’ data types. Also, we tried to play around by not providing the first argument to the DS.attr() method, then Ember does not remain the value for that particular attribute empty or unhandled rather it forced to matching JavaScript type. The other and the obvious way which clicked to us was this.The attributes are properties defined to convert the JSON data coming from our server into a record, and serializing a record to save back to the server after it has been modified. In above code we defined that ‘type’  has a default value of ‘text’ and ‘isRequired’ has default value ‘false’ which will be present at the time of model’s creation.

export default Model.extend({
 startTime : attr('object', { defaultValue: {} })
});


But soon after executing the code, we got a warning which can be seen below.The above code implies that whenever we create a new
event model then it would be expected to have an attribute startTime with value {}.

Non primitive defaultValues are deprecated because they are shared between all instances. If you would like to use a complex object as a default value please provide a function that returns the complex object.

The warning explains that ember-data model extends from Ember.Object, which means that arrays and objects will be shared among all instances of that model hence the use of non-primitive (apart from boolean, number & string) default values are deprecated.

Now again we thought of something that can handle ‘array’ and ‘object’ data types. We thought of adding a function which would convert them to the custom type. To add that we needed to provide proper serialize and deserialize methods for processing the data properly which was a bit tedious process and increase the overall complexity of code both in terms of execution as well as understanding.

After reading the available resources, we got to know that the defaultValue accepts the function as well. So what we finally did was passed a function which will add the months and days to the date object based on the current time which can be calculated using moment.

export default Model.extend({
 startTime : attr('date', { defaultValue: () => moment().add(1, 'months').startOf('day').toDate() }) 
});


The ability to pass afunction to defaultValue proved very helpful. It suits best if we want to set custom defaults.That’s it! Passing the function will ensure that every
startTime attribute contains it’s own date instance.

Additional Resources:

**image is licenced under free to use CC0 Public Domain

Using Day Night Theme in SUSI Android

SUSI is an artificial intelligence for interactive chat bots. It provides response to the user in most intuitive way. Therefore we thought why not implement the option to give theme preference to the user to make it more interactive. It will also help in increasing the user’s interest towards the application.

We tried out different themes and then finally decided to settle for the newly announced Day Night Theme for the SUSI Android App (https://github.com/fossasia/susi_android). This theme is provided by AppCompat 23.2.0 . With the help of this theme we can switch between Theme.AppCompat.Light (light) and Theme.AppCompat (dark) based on the user preference and time of day. For default the theme is set to the light theme and it can be easily changed from the settings. Thus it allows the user to change the theme according to his or her mood which looks very intuitive.

How to use this theme?

To use the Day Night theme is quite simple. We just need to extend our default theme to that of Theme.AppCompat.DayNight. The declaration is done as shown below in the screenshot.

<style name="MyTheme" parent="Theme.AppCompat.DayNight">

  <!-- Blah blah -->

</style>

Now to enable different features of the theme in our application we need to call AppCompatDelegate.setDefaultNightMode(). It takes one of the following values as the parameter.

  • MODE_NIGHT_NO. This is for the day (light) theme.
  • MODE_NIGHT_YES.This is for the night (dark) theme.
  • MODE_NIGHT_AUTO. It automatically changes between the above two themes based on the time of day.
  • MODE_NIGHT_FOLLOW_SYSTEM (default). This theme is dependent on the system settings of the user mobile phone.

We can set one of these parameters at the time of calling the function to fix the theme of the application in the following way.

static {

AppCompatDelegate.setDefaultNightMode(

          AppCompatDelegate.MODE_NIGHT_...);

}

The theme inside an activity is set at the time time of calling onCreate() method. Therefore we cannot change the theme from any other place inside our activity apart from onCreate(). If we want to set it inside our activity but outside the onCreate() method then we have to call the recreate() function to recreate the whole activity which will implement the selected theme.Let us look at the example.

public class MyActivity extends AppCompatActivity {

 public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {

      super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);

      if (savedInstanceState == null) {

          // Set the local night mode to some value

          getDelegate().setLocalNightMode(

                  AppCompatDelegate.MODE_NIGHT_...);

          // Now recreate for it to take effect

          recreate();

      }

  }

}

To take care of the text colors in our app we can set textColor attribute as

?android:attr/textColorPrimary

Now let us look at the implementation in Susi Android

In Susi Android we are providing user the option to select either the dark or the light theme in the settings.

 
The code for the implementation is as below

@Override

protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {

  super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);



  prefs = getSharedPreferences(Constant.THEME, MODE_PRIVATE);

  if(prefs.getString(Constant.THEME,"Dark").equals("Dark")) {

      AppCompatDelegate.setDefaultNightMode(AppCompatDelegate.MODE_NIGHT_YES);

  }

  else {

      AppCompatDelegate.setDefaultNightMode(AppCompatDelegate.MODE_NIGHT_NO);

  }



  setContentView(R.layout.activity_main);

}

The result output for the light theme is

To learn more about themes in Android you can refer to this link.

Resources

Addition of Bookmark Icon in Schedule ViewHolder in Open Event Android App

In the Open Event Android app we only had a list of sessions in the schedule page without  the ability to bookmark the session unless we went into the SessionDetailPage or visited the session list via the tracks page or the locations page. This was obviously very inconvenient. There were several iterations of UI design for the same. Taking cues from the Google I/O 17 App I thought that the addition of the Bookmark Icon in the Schedule ViewHolder would be helpful to the user. In this blog post I will be talking about how this feature was implemented.

Layout Implementation for the Bookmark Icon

<ImageButton
    android:id="@+id/slot_bookmark"
    android:layout_width="wrap_content"
    android:layout_height="wrap_content"
    android:layout_gravity="end"
    android:layout_alignParentEnd="true"
    android:layout_alignParentRight="true"
    android:layout_alignParentBottom="true"
    android:tint="@color/black"
    android:background="?attr/selectableItemBackgroundBorderless"
    android:contentDescription="@string/session_bookmark_status"
    android:padding="@dimen/padding_small"
    app:srcCompat="@drawable/ic_bookmark_border_white_24dp" />

The bookmark Icon was modelled as an ImageButton inside the item_schedule.xml file which serves as the layout file for the DayScheduleViewHolder.

Bookmark Icon Functionality in DayScheduleAdapter

The Bookmark Icon had mainly 3 roles :

  1. Add the session to the list of bookmarks (obviously)
  2. Generate the notification giving out the bookmarked session details.
  3. Generate a Snackbar if the icon was un-clicked which allowed the user to restore the bookmarked status of the session.
  4. Update the bookmarks widget.

Now we will be seeing how was all this done. Some of this was already done previously in the SessionListAdapter. We just had to modify some of the code to get our desired result.

       Session not bookmarked                      Session bookmarked                      

First we just set a different icon to highlight the Bookmarked and the un-bookmarked status. This code snippet highlights how this is done.

if(session.isBookmarked()) {
    slot_bookmark.setImageResource(R.drawable.ic_bookmark_white_24dp);
 } else {
 slot_bookmark.setImageResource(R.drawable.ic_bookmark_border_white_24dp);
 }
 slot_bookmark.setColorFilter(storedColor,PorterDuff.Mode.SRC_ATOP);

We check if the session is bookmarked by calling a function isBookmarked() and choose one of the 2 bookmark icons depending upon the bookmark status.

If a session was found out to be bookmarked and the Bookmark Icon was we use the WidgetUpdater.updateWidget() function to remove that particular session from the  Bookmark Widget of the app. During this a  Snackbar is also generated “Bookmark Removed” with an UNDO option which is functional.

realmRepo.setBookmark(sessionId, false).subscribe();
 slot_bookmark.setImageResource(R.drawable.ic_bookmark_border_white_24dp);
 
 if ("MainActivity".equals(context.getClass().getSimpleName())) {
    Snackbar.make(slot_content, R.string.removed_bookmark, Snackbar.LENGTH_LONG)
            .setAction(R.string.undo, view -> {
 
                realmRepo.setBookmark(sessionId, true).subscribe();
                slot_bookmark.setImageResource(R.drawable.ic_bookmark_white_24dp);
 
                WidgetUpdater.updateWidget(context);
            }).show();

else {
    Snackbar.make(slot_content, R.string.removed_bookmark, Snackbar.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
 }

If a session wasn’t bookmarked earlier but the Bookmark Icon was clicked we would firstly need to update the bookmark status within our local Realm Database.

realmRepo.setBookmark(sessionId, true).subscribe();

We would also create a notification to notify the user.

NotificationUtil.createNotification(session, context).subscribe(
        () -> Snackbar.make(slot_content,
                R.string.added_bookmark,
                Snackbar.LENGTH_SHORT)
                .show(),
        throwable -> Snackbar.make(slot_content,
                R.string.error_create_notification,
                Snackbar.LENGTH_LONG).show());

The static class Notification Util is responsible for the generation of notifications. The internal working of that class is not necessary right now. What this snippet of code does is that It creates a Snackbar upon successful notification with the text “Bookmark Added” and if any error occurs a Snackbar with the text “Error Creating Notification” is generated.

slot_bookmark.setImageResource(R.drawable.ic_bookmark_white_24dp);
 slot_bookmark.setColorFilter(storedColor,PorterDuff.Mode.SRC_ATOP);

This snippet of code is responsible for the colors that are assigned to the Bookmark Icons for different tracks and this color is obtained in the following manner.

int storedColor = currentSession.getTrack().getColor()

So now we have successfully added the Bookmark Icon to the ScheduleViewHolder inside the schedule of the app.

Resources