Announcing the FOSSASIA 2017 #CodeHeat Winners

Drum roll please! We are very proud to announce the 2017 FOSSASIA #CodeHeat Grand Prize Winners and Finalists. 442 participants from 13 countries and 5 continents committed over 1000 pull requests to our repositories over the course of the contest. Congratulations to everyone to this fantastic achievement! The winners were now chosen by our jury. Thank you for reviewing the contributions.

Our three Grand Prize winners will travel to the FOSSASIA Summit in Singapore from March 17-19 and present their work to developers from around the world. The winners are (in alphabetical order):

Mayank Tripathi (mayank408)

Medozonuo Suohu (magdalenesuo)

Shubham Padia (shubham-padia)

Our other finalists will receive a voucher to support trips to Open Tech conferences in the region to connect with developers and the community.

Achint Sharma (Achint08)

Deepjyoti Mondal (djmgit)

Hemant Jadon (hemantjadon)

Pranjal Paliwal (betterclever)

Rishi Raj (rishiraj824)

Saurabh (gogeta95)

Utkarsh Gupta (uttu357)

 

Certificate of Participation

Many developers made outstanding contributions in the last months and we all learned a lot during the contest. Thank you so much! We hope you stay on board and continue to participate in the community to develop Open Tech that improves peoples lives and to seize the opportunity to develop your code profile with FOSSASIA. To receive your certificate of participation now, please claim it here.

Supporting Partners

We would also like to extend a special Thank you to our jury and to our supporting partners at the UNESCO and the Open Tech Society.

Thanks FOSSASIA mentors!

And we really love the work of our mentors! Thanks for your patient guidance, helping everyone with learning about best practices, reviewing the huge number of pull requests and discussing questions on the chat channels. Many of our mentors have been students in coding programs before and we are very very proud to see how you help newcomers to join. Keep up the fantastic work!

Python code examples

I’ve met many weird examples of  behaviour in python language while working on Open Event project. Today I’d like to share some examples with you. I think this knowledge is necessary, if you’d like to increase a  bit your knowledge in python area.

Simple adding one element to python list:

def foo(value, x=[]):
  x.append(value)
  return x

>>> print(foo(1))
>>> print(foo(2))
>>> print(foo(3, []))
>>> print(foo(4))

OUTPUT

[1] 
[1, 2] 
[3]
[1, 2, 4]

First output is obvious, but second not exactly. Let me explain it, It happens because x(empty list) argument is only evaluated once, So on every call foo(), we modify that list, appending a value to it. Finally we have [1,2, 4] output. I recommend to avoid mutable params as default.

Another example:

Do you know which type it is?

>>> print(type([ el for el in range(10)]))
>>> print(type({ el for el in range(10)}))
>>> print(type(( el for el in range(10))))

Again first and second type are obvious <class ‘list’>, <class ‘set’>. You may  think that last one should return type tuple but it returns a generator <class ‘generator’>.

Example:

Do you think that below code returns an exception?

list= [1,2,3,4,5]
>>> print(list [8:])

If you think that above expression returns index error you’re wrong. It returns empty list [].

Example funny boolean operators

>>> 'c' == ('c' or 'b')
True
>>> 'd' == ('a' or 'd')
False
>>> 'c' == ('c' and 'b')
False 
>>> 'd' == ('a' and 'd')
True

You can think that that OR and AND operators are broken.

You have to know how python interpreter behaves while looking for OR and AND operators.

So OR Expression takes the first statement and checks if it is true. If the first statement is true, then Python returns object’s value without checking second value. If first statement is false interpreter checks second value and returns that value.

AND operator checks if first statement is false, the whole statement has to be false. So it returns first value, but if first statement is true it checks second statement and returns second value.

Below i will show you how it works

>>> 'c' == ('c' or 'b')
>>> 'c' == 'c'
True
>>> 'd' == ('a' or 'd')
>>> 'd' == 'a'
False
>>> 'c' == ('c' and 'b')
>>> 'c' == 'b'
False 
>>> 'd' == ('a' and 'd')
>>> 'd' == 'd'
True

I hope that i have explained you how the python interpreter checks OR and AND operators. So know above examples should be more understandable.

Google Code-In Success: FOSSASIA Top-Ranked Organization

FOSSASIA‘s first participation of Google Code-in contest as a mentoring organizations was a great success with 587 tasks completed, most by any organization this year, out of a total of 725 published tasks. The twelve participating organizations included projects like Wikimedia, Sugarlabs, Sahana, Drupal, KDE and OpenMRS.

Students from all around the world aged 13-17 years old worked with mentors of FOSSASIA on improving open source software during the 7 weeks the contest is run. They coded programs, designed artworks, tested software and more than anything else had fun.

174 students managed to complete at least one task with FOSSASIA and 43 out of them claimed a cool t-shirt from Google by completing 3 or more tasks.

Out of the 10 students who completed most number of tasks finalists and grand prize winners were picked collectively by FOSSASIA’s 24 mentors. Namanyay Goel and Samarjeet Singh won the grand prize, which is an all expense paid trip to Google HQ in Mountain View, California. Alvis Wong, Amr Ramadan and Tymon Radzik emerged as finalists. Congratulations finalists! Safe travels grand prize winners! We are thankful for your precious contributions and will be delighted see you continue to contribute even after the program.

Open source projects ExpEYES, sup, TiddlySpace, p5.js among few others, benefitted from FOSSASIA students’ work. More than 150 open source/ open tech projects and communities around asia were connected to FOSSASIA with the help of students. Students also worked together to build a nice website portraying students and mentors.

We would like to thank all participated students for the amazing interest they showed in our tasks. Its great to see some of them still hang around to help us. 24 mentors of FOSSASIA worked hard and stood up to the challenge of finding time to work with and help out students while having other obligations. Thank you mentors! Lastly we are grateful to Stephanie Taylor and Co. at the Google OSPO, for organizing the wonderful contest.

Google Code-In FOSSASIA Mentor Package Wonderful Surprise: Mentors received a Thank You Package from Google

Sleeping peacefully - Nephew of Michael Cheng: Mentor's Family Enjoying "Open Source" Thank you package Sleeping peacefully – Nephew of Michael Cheng: Mentor’s Family Enjoying “Open Source” Thank you package

Links

FOSSASIA GCI: http://www.google-melange.com/gci/org/google/gci2014/fossasia

Google Blog about GCI: http://google-opensource.blogspot.de/2015/02/google-code-in-2014-magic-in-numbers.html