Handling data in android

So this week I was working with getting some data from the sqlite database in android and someone who was a beginner in android also asked me to help him with the same. I asked him what he knew and he said that even after reading up a lot he wasn’t able to figure out what exactly to do with the data he wants to save and use in his app. I have seen that this is a problem with a lot of people starting to develop android apps. So, I decided to write a blog on how can you handle your data in your android apps.

Most of the android apps need to save data even if only to save some user preferences. So primarily there are 3 ways to save your data :

  1. In form of key values (SharedPreferences)
  2. Reading/Writing to files
  3. Writing to a database

So let’s go step by step. When we need to store just some preferences of the users like if they want notifications or what kind of theme they want : light or dark etc. So basically if we want to store a key value in the persitant storage of the app we can do that using SharedPreferences. To use sharedpreferences, we initialise the sharedpreference object like

SharedPreferences sharedPreferences = PreferenceManager.getDefaultSharedPreferences(this);

in oncreate and cache it. Then we just need to add or retrieve what we want using this cached SharedPreferences object. To Add a key value pair :

sharedPreferences.edit().putString("someKey", "someValue").apply();

Also you can put all kinds of stuff here. For example right now we added a string with key “someKey” and Value “someValue”. We can also add Booleans, Floats, Ints, Longs, StringSets etc.

To retrieve the same value we do something like this

sharedPreferences.getString("someKey", "DefaultValue");

Now if you want some logs or some values that can be exported and sent to your server, you should write them to files and maybe read some json inputs etc. as well.

Basically android has a File system similar to other platforms. All android devices have two file storage areas : “Internal” and “external” storage. The difference between them is as follows :

Internal :

  • Always available
  • Files saved here are accesible by only your app
  • When user uninstalls the app, system removes all your app’s files from internal storage

Best to use this when you want to be sure that neither the user nor the other app’s can access your files

External :

  • It’s not always available because user can mount external storage as USB storage and remove it as well
  • It’s readable by anything(Other apps, users etc.)
  • When you uninstall, system removes your app’s files from here only if you save them in the directory from getExternalFilesDir()

Now to read and write files, you need extra permissions

  • android.permission.WRITE_EXTERNAL_STORAGE
  • android.permission.READ_EXTERNAL_STORAGE

So now let’s get down to it. How do I save and read files in my app?

You first initialise the File object

File file = new File(context.getFilesDir(), filename);

This will create a file with filename in the internal storage. For external storage

first check if the storage is available, then just create a file using getExternalStoragePublicDirectory

File file = new File(Environment.getExternalStoragePublicDirectory(
            Environment.DIRECTORY_PICTURES), albumName);
    if (!file.mkdirs()) {
        Log.e(LOG_TAG, "Directory not created");
    }
    return file;

This is for writing public files.

Now we move onto the most used part in an android app which is a database.Android has a built in SQLite database package which helps us in writing databases in files with syntax similar to SQL.

You need to add 2 classes which are mandatory and another class which basically helps you get organised. So the first is a Contract. This is where you actually write statements that will be executed later on to initialise or create the tables we want. For this make an a static abstract inner class that implements BaseColums like

public static abstract class Microlocation implements BaseColumns {
    public static final String TABLE_NAME = "microlocation";

    public static final String ID = "id";

    public static final String NAME = "name";

    public static final String LATITUDE = "latitude";

    public static final String LONGITUDE = "longitude";

    public static final String FLOOR = "floor";

    public static final String[] FULL_PROJECTION = {
            ID,
            NAME,
            LATITUDE,
            LONGITUDE,
            FLOOR

    };

    public static final String CREATE_TABLE =
            "CREATE TABLE " + TABLE_NAME
                    + " ("
                    + ID + INT_TYPE + PRIMARY_KEY + COMMA_SEP
                    + NAME + TEXT_TYPE + COMMA_SEP
                    + LATITUDE + REAL_TYPE + COMMA_SEP
                    + LONGITUDE + REAL_TYPE + COMMA_SEP
                    + FLOOR + INT_TYPE
                    + " );";

    public static final String DELETE_TABLE = "DROP TABLE IF EXISTS " + TABLE_NAME;


}

Here we are making static final Strings for column names and then creating a static final String CREATE_TABLE which is basically a statement that creates the table Microlocation with the specified key, columns, data types etc.

After adding this structure for all the tables we want to have in our database, we move on to adding a DbHelper class that extends SQLiteOpenHelper which basically has two Abstract methods called onCreate(SQLiteDatabase db) and onUpgrade(SQLiteDatabase db) which are called when the database is created and database version is changed respectively. We call all our CREATE_TABLE static Strings in onCreate which in turn creates all the tables. Something like this :

@Override
public void onCreate(SQLiteDatabase db) {
    db.execSQL(DbContract.Speakers.CREATE_TABLE);
    db.execSQL(DbContract.Sponsors.CREATE_TABLE);
    db.execSQL(DbContract.Sessions.CREATE_TABLE);
    db.execSQL(DbContract.Tracks.CREATE_TABLE);
    db.execSQL(DbContract.Sessionsspeakers.CREATE_TABLE);
    db.execSQL(DbContract.Event.CREATE_TABLE);
    db.execSQL(DbContract.Microlocation.CREATE_TABLE);
    db.execSQL(DbContract.Versions.CREATE_TABLE);
    db.execSQL(DbContract.Bookmarks.CREATE_TABLE);
    db.execSQL(DbContract.EventDates.CREATE_TABLE);
}

You can also call DELETE_TABLE Strings in onUpgrade and the call onCreate again if you like but it’s not compulsory.

Now that you’re database is initialised, let’s add some records into it. For example I have to add a new Micrlocation I’d create a method in my data model where I’ll add a basic structure for the query and then format it with the values for a particular object of the model. Something, like this

public String generateSql() {
    String insertQuery = "INSERT INTO %s VALUES ('%d', %s, '%f', '%f', '%d');";
    return String.format(Locale.ENGLISH,
            insertQuery,
            DbContract.Microlocation.TABLE_NAME,
            id,
            DatabaseUtils.sqlEscapeString(StringUtils.optionalString(name)),
            latitude,
            longitude,
            floor);
}

and then I’d execute the string returned by the call

String query = model.generateSql();

by this

public void insertQuery(String query, DbHelper mDbHelper) {
    SQLiteDatabase db = mDbHelper.getWritableDatabase();
    db.beginTransaction();
    db.execSQL(query);
  
    db.setTransactionSuccessful();
    db.endTransaction();
}

Where db is just a SQLiteDatabase instance.

Now that we have records we want to retrieve them according to usage and for that we create helper methods. This is an example of the retrieving all the microlocations added to the database in ASCENDING order of NAME

public ArrayList<org.fossasia.openevent.data.Microlocation> getMicrolocationsList(SQLiteDatabase mDb) {
    String sortOrder = DbContract.Microlocation.NAME + ASCENDING;
    Cursor cursor = mDb.query(
            DbContract.Microlocation.TABLE_NAME,
            DbContract.Microlocation.FULL_PROJECTION,
            null,
            null,
            null,
            null,
            sortOrder
    );

    ArrayList<org.fossasia.openevent.data.Microlocation> microlocations = new ArrayList<>();
    org.fossasia.openevent.data.Microlocation microlocation;

    cursor.moveToFirst();
    while (!cursor.isAfterLast()) {
        microlocation = new org.fossasia.openevent.data.Microlocation(
                cursor.getInt(cursor.getColumnIndex(DbContract.Microlocation.ID)),
                cursor.getString(cursor.getColumnIndex(DbContract.Microlocation.NAME)),
                cursor.getFloat(cursor.getColumnIndex(DbContract.Microlocation.LATITUDE)),
                cursor.getFloat(cursor.getColumnIndex(DbContract.Microlocation.LONGITUDE)),
                cursor.getInt(cursor.getColumnIndex(DbContract.Microlocation.FLOOR))
        );
        microlocations.add(microlocation);
        cursor.moveToNext();
    }
    cursor.close();
    return microlocations;
}

First we create a cursor and then just iterate of the cursor to get microlocation objects and add them to an Arralist and return the Arraylist to the calling method.

So This are most of the things that are there to handling data in Android. Should be sufficient to get you started.

Sorry for the long post but the content couldn’t be made any smaller but I hope you gain something from this post. You can checkout implementations I have followed for the Open event project in the github repo https://github.com/fossasia/open-event-android. You can also write to me anytime on FB, Twitter, Email etc. and I’ll be happy to answer any queries. Adios!

References : 1) developers.android.com

2) https://github.com/fossasia/open-event-android

UI Testing in Android


Testing in android is something that most people simply don’t do. When I first started with developing android apps, I followed the same dev cycle :

  • Develop a feature
  • deploy to a device
  • manual testing for bugs and errors
  • fix these issues due to wrong implementation
  • then again deploy and manually test and so on……

Trust me it’s a tedious process and no one actually can test for the corner cases that may arise. You may be able to cover like 85% of the cases for each feature but when there are a ton of features you’ll collectively cover much less than 85% as well. So, We should definitely write tests for android. I’ll start with Espresso testing first.

Quote from the Android developer website:


“Testing user interactions within a single app helps to ensure that users do not encounter unexpected results or have a poor experience when interacting with your app. You should get into the habit of creating user interface (UI) tests if you need to verify that the UI of your app is functioning correctly.

The Espresso testing framework, provided by the Android Testing Support Library, provides APIs for writing UI tests to simulate user interactions within a single target app. Espresso tests can run on devices running Android 2.2 (API level 8) and higher. A key benefit of using Espresso is that it provides automatic synchronization of test actions with the UI of the app you are testing. Espresso detects when the main thread is idle, so it is able to run your test commands at the appropriate time, improving the reliability of your tests. This capability also relieves you from having to adding any timing workarounds, such as a sleep period, in your test code.

The Espresso testing framework is an instrumentation-based API and works with theAndroidJUnitRunner test runner.”


Getting started

We first need to setup espresso in android studio. That can be done by adding this to the app level build.gradle

dependencies {
    ...
    androidTestCompile 'com.android.support.test.espresso:espresso-core:2.2.1'
}

After adding this dependency and setting up testing on android, now we can move on to write some tests. We start by adding a new class in androidTest where we will actually write the tests. There are 3 parts to writing an espresso test :

  1. ViewMatchers: Find a view to act/assert upon something
  2. ViewActions: something to perform an action(click, type etc.)
  3. ViewAssertion: something to verify what you expect

Components

  1. For writing tests in espresso we just have to use these three parts to see if the ui is working as it should.

    Let’s say we want to type some text in an edittext and see if the text we have typed is as we expect it to be.

    To start, we’ll see how we use viewMatchers. We need to find a view in ViewMatchers. For that, we will do something like this

    withId(R.id.edittext_id)

    Now we perform a click on this eddittext

    perform(typeText("Hello"))

    Now we join the two by wrapping in onView()

    onView(withId(R.id.edittext_id)).perform(typetext("Hello"))

    This will just type “Hello” in the edittext with the id eddittext_id, now we need to check if this is what was actually expected, for that we will have to further a viewAssertion on this like this :

    onView(withText("Hello")).check(matches(isDisplayed()));

    This is a cheatsheet that shows various methods that can be used in espresso.

    So this is how we can perform basic ui tests using espresso. Mainly people face the issue of deciding on the views that we have to perform this action on. Just think of the 3 components that we have previously talked about (View matching, View action and View assertions), if you think a view can have all three of these, then you can write a test for it. Go ahead and try it for yourself. Cheers!


Working with Styles and Themes in Android

All those who have worked with styles and themes know that they’re hard to get right. We tend to get frustrated when we work with them. The hierarchy easily devolves into spaghetti code. How often did you want to change a style but feared you might break the continuity of the design of the app somewhere or the other.

I ran into a similar situation recently. I had to change the whole app’s style’s and theme by just changing the colors etc. in one location. This was for the Open Event android project where we wanted that while generating an apk by the apk generator we could change the color scheme of the app and could make it customisable for the needs of the organisations.

So, I’ll be talking about styling different views in this post. This shall be a long post!

When should we use styles

First of all, most of us get confused on when should we use styles instead of an inline attribute. Now I am going to show the rules that I follow:

When you have multiple views that should look identical ( Perhaps that do similar things)

Few Examples :

  • Payment screens. You want to get the user through a bunch of ordering and payment screens. You need similar kind of buttons there to make it look like a continuous process. Hence we make the Buttons follow one particular style
<style name="Payment_Buttons">
    <item name="android:minWidth">@dimen/button_min_width</item>
    <item name="android:minHeight">@dimen/button_min_height</item>
    <item name="android:background">@color/my_choice_color</item>
</style>

Try to use themes to tweak default styles

Themes provide a way of defining the default style of many widgets. For example :

If you want to define the default button for all of your payment screens in the example above, you can do something like :

<style name="ButtonTheme">
    <item name="android:buttonStyle">@style/MyButton</item>
</style>

But note that if you’re tweaking the default style, the only tricky part is to figure out the parent of your style but that’s really dificult due to a lot of variation within the different versions of android. If you’re using something that’s part of the AppCompat, then it’s okay. you don’t need to worry about the variations but when you want to style something not in AppCompat, then the main problem arises. So For example I want a button to be Holo until kitkat and then Material starting Lollipop, I’ll do something like this :

In values/styles.xml –

<style name="ButtonParent" Parent = "android:Widget.Holo.Button" />
<style name="ButtonParent.Holo">
    <item name="android:background">@drawable/my_bg</item>
</style>

Then in values-v21/styles.xml:

<style name="ButtonParent" parent ="android:Widget.Material.Button/>

This makes the button consistent with guidelines and the app looks perfect.

Now, Themes vs Styles

This is a topic which most of the developers don’t know about. They get confused on what is the difference between them. I was also not totally clear about this until recently. A theme is infact a style, the only difference is the usage.

  • We set a theme in the Manifest of the app or an activity
  • We set a style in a layout file or a widget
  • There are more styles than themes (Checkout styles.xml and themes.xml)
  • Definition of a theme is in the essence jsut a collection of references to stlyes that the theme will use.
  • To elaborate, let’s see the example of Theme.Holo :

It has a combination of

  1. Widget.Holo.Button
  2. Widget.Holo.Button.Small
  3. TextAppearence.Holo.Small
  4. TextAppearence.Holo.Small.Inverse

So, There can be different styles like this which can be referenced in a theme. Themes can be divided into 2 parts : General themes and sub themes

You can have a general them like Theme.ABC and if you want a variation of this general theme, for example no actionbar, you can add another theme like Theme.ABC.NoActionBar . This theme will not have the ActionBar

Inheritance

One of the interesting things that most people don’t know about is inhertance of styles/themes. What do I mean by this is that you can use existing styles and create some variations to suit different needs. There are 2 ways to use this inheritance. I’m going to try to explain and elorate on them :

  1. With a parent attribute

This is the most common way to use it and the way that most of the developers learn it while working on styles for the first time.

So how actually do we use it?

<style name = "Child" parent = "@style/Parent">
</style>

Here the child inherits all the properties of the style with the name “Parent” and define new properties in this style name “Child” where they can define new properties they want on top of the parent style.

2. With implicit style names

The other way to inherit styles/themes using the implicit way. Instead of setting a parent attribute, just prefix your new style/theme with the name of its parent and a dot. Something like this :

<style name = "Parent.Child">
</style>

This works the same as the previous method. Using this reduces some time to write additional parameter and is used by almost all experienced developers.

Plus you get some checks as well while writing code in Android studio. But be careful while using this as you need to take care of somethings :

For example,

  • The Parent style/theme needs to exist, Otherwise an error
  • You cannot inherit default themes and styles. For example you can’t create
<style name = "Theme.Holo.myTheme">

but you do this

<style name = "myTheme" parent = "Theme.Holo">

I know this can be overwhelming for a person who’s just starting with styles and themes. Trust me I was also not able to understand the concepts on the first go. I had to spend some time to grasp all that can be done using styles and themes. So I think this should be it for this blog. It’s already gotten pretty big.

Be sure to check out the Open event android project here and the usage of styles and themes there. Ciao till next time!

Creating a Widget for your Android App

Having a widget for your app, not only helps it to stand out among its alternatives but also provides user information on the go without having to open the app.

Keeping this thought in mind, I decided to make a widget for my GSoC project.

Do you want to know how to do it?
Hang around and I’ll guide you through the steps involved.

Step 1 :

Creating a new widget from Android Studio.

Open up your project for which you need a widget and navigate to the project’s java source.
Create a new sub-package there named widget.
Right click on the newly created sub-package and select the New->Widget option from there.

new_widget

Follow the instructions on the next screen.

screenshot-area-2016-07-30-002554
Most of the fields here are pretty much self explanatory

After doing this and running the app in your device, you will be able to see a widget for your app in the widget picker.

Screenshot_20160730-003515_01

Well, that’s it then? :p

Just kidding, this was the easy part, off to more harder things now!

Step 2 :

Populating the widget with data.

Now, there can be 2 broad type of widgets Information Widgets and Collection Widgets.

Information widgets are simple widgets that are used to display an information that changes with time, for example Weather Widget or a Clock Widget.

Whereas, collection widgets are widgets which display a collection of data, for example the GMail widget is a collection widget.
These are relatively complex and harder than the Information Widgets.

In this post, we will focus on making a Collection Widget.

For Collection widgets, we need two layout files, one for the widget and one for each item in the widget collection.

Go ahead and create the two layout files.
The wizard automatically generates the widget_layout.xml for you, you just need to edit it up.

stock_layout.xml
<LinearLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent"
    android:orientation="vertical">

    <LinearLayout
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:id="@+id/widget_toolbar"
        android:layout_height="?android:attr/actionBarSize"
        android:background="@color/colorPrimary">

        <ImageView
            android:layout_width="wrap_content"
            android:layout_height="match_parent"
            android:layout_gravity="center"
            android:src="@drawable/stock_up"
            android:contentDescription="@string/stock_widget" />

        <ImageView
            android:layout_width="wrap_content"
            android:layout_height="match_parent"
            android:layout_gravity="center"
            android:src="@drawable/stock_down"
            android:contentDescription="@string/stock_widget" />

        <TextView
            android:layout_width="0dp"
            android:layout_height="match_parent"
            android:layout_weight="1"
            android:layout_marginStart="32dp"
            android:gravity="center_vertical"
            android:text="@string/your_stocks"
            android:textAppearance="@android:style/TextAppearance.DeviceDefault.Widget.ActionBar.Title"
            android:layout_marginLeft="32dp" />
    </LinearLayout>

    <ListView
        android:id="@+id/widget_listView"
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:background="@color/backGround"></ListView>

</LinearLayout>
list_item.xml
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<LinearLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    xmlns:tools="http://schemas.android.com/tools"
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="72dp"
    android:gravity="center_vertical"
    android:orientation="horizontal"
    android:paddingLeft="16dp"
    android:paddingRight="16dp"
    >
  <TextView
      android:id="@+id/stock_symbol"
      style="@style/StockSymbolTextStyle"
      android:layout_width="wrap_content"
      android:layout_height="wrap_content"
      android:gravity="start|center_vertical"
      tools:text="List Item"
      />
</LinearLayout>

Next up, having a look at the modified files, we can see that the Widget creation wizard added some stuff into out AndroidManifest.xml and created a new java file.

Upon taking a closer look at the manifest, we can see that the widget’s java class has been registered as a <receiver/>

Next, opening up the NewAppWidget.java, we will see that it extends AppWidgetProvider and some methods are already overridden for you.

Time to edit up this file to reference to the layouts we have just created.

import android.annotation.TargetApi;
import android.app.PendingIntent;
import android.appwidget.AppWidgetManager;
import android.appwidget.AppWidgetProvider;
import android.content.Context;
import android.content.Intent;
import android.os.Build;
import android.support.annotation.NonNull;
import android.widget.RemoteViews;

/**
 * Implementation of App Widget functionality.
 */
public class StockWidgetProvider extends AppWidgetProvider {

    private static void updateAppWidget(Context context, AppWidgetManager appWidgetManager,
                                        int appWidgetId) {
        // Construct the RemoteViews object which defines the view of out widget
        RemoteViews views = new RemoteViews(context.getPackageName(), R.layout.widget_layout);
        // Instruct the widget manager to update the widget
        if (Build.VERSION.SDK_INT >= Build.VERSION_CODES.ICE_CREAM_SANDWICH) {
            setRemoteAdapter(context, views);
        } else {
            setRemoteAdapterV11(context, views);
        }
        /** PendingIntent to launch the MainActivity when the widget was clicked **/
        Intent launchMain = new Intent(context, MainActivity.class);
        PendingIntent pendingMainIntent = PendingIntent.getActivity(context, 0, launchMain, 0);
        views.setOnClickPendingIntent(R.id.widget, pendingMainIntent);
        appWidgetManager.notifyAppWidgetViewDataChanged(appWidgetId,R.id.widget_listView);
        appWidgetManager.updateAppWidget(appWidgetId, views);
    }

    @Override
    public void onUpdate(Context context, AppWidgetManager appWidgetManager, int[] appWidgetIds) {
        // There may be multiple widgets active, so update all of them
        for (int appWidgetId : appWidgetIds) {
            updateAppWidget(context, appWidgetManager, appWidgetId);
        }

        super.onUpdate(context, appWidgetManager, appWidgetIds);
    }

    @Override
    public void onEnabled(Context context) {
        // Enter relevant functionality for when the first widget is created
    }

    @Override
    public void onDisabled(Context context) {
        // Enter relevant functionality for when the last widget is disabled
    }

  /** Set the Adapter for out widget **/

    @TargetApi(Build.VERSION_CODES.ICE_CREAM_SANDWICH)
    private static void setRemoteAdapter(Context context, @NonNull final RemoteViews views) {
        views.setRemoteAdapter(R.id.widget_listView,
                new Intent(context, StockWidgetService.class));
    }

    
    /** Deprecated method, don't create this if you are not planning to support devices below 4.0 **/
    @SuppressWarnings("deprecation")
    private static void setRemoteAdapterV11(Context context, @NonNull final RemoteViews views) {
        views.setRemoteAdapter(0, R.id.widget_listView,
                new Intent(context, StockWidgetService.class));
    }

}

Now, create a WidgetDataProvider which will provide us with data to be displayed inside the widget.

You can use a static data for now (like a prefilled ArrayList, but make sure that this data should be dynamic for making the widget meaningful)

import android.content.Context;
import android.content.Intent;
import android.database.Cursor;
import android.os.Binder;
import android.widget.RemoteViews;
import android.widget.RemoteViewsService;

/**
 * Created by the-dagger on 24/7/16.
 */

public class WidgetDataProvider implements RemoteViewsService.RemoteViewsFactory {

    private Context context;
    private Cursor cursor;
    private Intent intent;

    //For obtaining the activity's context and intent
    public WidgetDataProvider(Context context, Intent intent) {
        this.context = context;
        this.intent = intent;
    }

    private void initCursor(){
        if (cursor != null) {
            cursor.close();
        }
        final long identityToken = Binder.clearCallingIdentity();    
        /**This is done because the widget runs as a separate thread 
        when compared to the current app and hence the app's data won't be accessible to it
        because I'm using a content provided **/
        cursor = context.getContentResolver().query(QuoteProvider.Quotes.CONTENT_URI,
                new String[]{QuoteColumns._ID, QuoteColumns.SYMBOL, QuoteColumns.BIDPRICE,
                        QuoteColumns.PERCENT_CHANGE, QuoteColumns.CHANGE, QuoteColumns.ISUP},
                QuoteColumns.ISCURRENT + " = ?",
                new String[]{"1"},null);
        Binder.restoreCallingIdentity(identityToken);
    }

    @Override
    public void onCreate() {
        initCursor();
        if (cursor != null) {
            cursor.moveToFirst();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public void onDataSetChanged() {
        /** Listen for data changes and initialize the cursor again **/
        initCursor();
    }

    @Override
    public void onDestroy() {
    cursor.close();
    }

    @Override
    public int getCount() {
        return cursor.getCount();
    }

    @Override
    public RemoteViews getViewAt(int i) {
        /** Populate your widget's single list item **/
        RemoteViews remoteViews = new RemoteViews(context.getPackageName(), R.layout.list_item_quote);
        cursor.moveToPosition(i);
        remoteViews.setTextViewText(R.id.stock_symbol,cursor.getString(cursor.getColumnIndex(QuoteColumns.SYMBOL)));
        remoteViews.setTextViewText(R.id.bid_price,cursor.getString(cursor.getColumnIndex(QuoteColumns.BIDPRICE)));
        remoteViews.setTextViewText(R.id.change,cursor.getString(cursor.getColumnIndex(QuoteColumns.CHANGE)));
        if (cursor.getString(cursor.getColumnIndex(QuoteColumns.ISUP)).equals("1")) {
            remoteViews.setInt(R.id.change, "setBackgroundResource", R.drawable.percent_change_pill_green);
        } else {
            remoteViews.setInt(R.id.change, "setBackgroundResource", R.drawable.percent_change_pill_red);
        }
        return remoteViews;
    }

    @Override
    public RemoteViews getLoadingView() {
        return null;
    }

    @Override
    public int getViewTypeCount() {
        return 1;
    }

    @Override
    public long getItemId(int i) {
        return i;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean hasStableIds() {
        return true;
    }
}

Let’s also create a service that invokes the WidgetDataProvider after a fixed interval

import android.content.Intent;
import android.widget.RemoteViewsService;

/**
 * Created by the-dagger on 24/7/16.
 */

public class StockWidgetService extends RemoteViewsService {
    @Override
    public RemoteViewsFactory onGetViewFactory(Intent intent) {
        return new WidgetDataProvider(this,intent);
    }
}

Phew.. almost done with this now.

Finally edit up the widget_info.xml located inside /res/values/xml/ of your project.

Edit it to reference the time after which your widget will be updated, the preview image which should show up in the widget picker and minimum width and height of the widget.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<appwidget-provider xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:initialKeyguardLayout="@layout/app_widget"
    android:initialLayout="@layout/app_widget"
    android:minHeight="110dp"
    android:minWidth="170dp"
    android:previewImage="@drawable/example_appwidget_preview"
    android:resizeMode="horizontal|vertical"
    android:updatePeriodMillis="86400000"
    android:widgetCategory="home_screen"></appwidget-provider>

Well, once this is done, go ahead and fire up your app.

You will be able to see the newly created and updated widget in your homescreen.

 widget

Pretty awesome right!
Congratulations on making your first widget.

For now the app only opens a specific activity on clicking it, but you can read up a bit on how to execute a separate task on clicking each item on the list by using a pendingIntent.

Well, that’s it for this week.
Thank you for going through this post and leave your suggestions and queries in the comments.

Cheers.

Unit testing JSON files in assets folder of Android App

So here is the scenario, your android app has a lot of json files in the assets folder that are used to load some data when in first runs.
You are writing some unit tests, and want to make sure the integrity of the data in the assets/*.json are preserved.

You’d assume, that reading JSON files should not involve using the Android Runtime in any way, and we should be able to read JSON files in local JVM as well. But you’re wrong. The JSONObject and JSONArray classes of Android are part of android.jar, and hence

 
JSONObject myJson = new JSONObject(someString);

The above code will not work when running unit tests on local JVM.

Fortunately, our codebase already using Google’s GSoN library to parse JSON, and that works on local JVM too (because GSoN is a core Java library, not specifically an Android library).

Now the second problem that comes is that when running unit tests on local JVM we do not have the getResources() or getAssets() functions.
So how do we retrieve a file from the assets folder ?

So what I found out (after a bit of trial and error and poking around with various dir paths), is that the tests are run from the app folder (app being the Android application module – it is named app by default by Android Studio, though you might have had named it differently)

So in the tests file you can define at the beginning

    public static final String  ASSET_BASE_PATH = "../app/src/main/assets/";

And also create the following helper function

    public String readJsonFile (String filename) throws IOException {
        BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(new FileInputStream(ASSET_BASE_PATH + filename)));
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        String line = br.readLine();
        while (line != null) {
            sb.append(line);
            line = br.readLine();
        }

        return sb.toString();
    }

Now wherever you need this JSON data you can just do the following

        Gson gson = new GsonBuilder().create();
        events = gson.fromJson(readJsonFile("events.json"),
                Event.EventList.class);
        eventDatesList = gson.fromJson(readJsonFile("eventDates.json"), EventDates.EventDatesList.class);

Getting fired up with Firebase Database

As you might’ve noticed, in my Open Event Android Project, we are asking the user to enter his/her details and then using these details at the backend for generating the app according to his/her needs.

One thing to wonder is how did we transmit the details from webpage to the server.

Well, this is where Firebase comes to the rescue one more time!

If you’ve read my previous post on Firebase Storage, you might have started to appreciate what an awesometastic service Firebase is.

So without any further adieu, lets get started with this.

Step 1 :

Add your project to Firebase from the console.

 newProj
Click on the Blue button

Step 2 :

Add Firebase to your webapp

Open the project, you’ve just created and click on the bright red button that says, “ Add Firebase to your web app”

 addFirebase

Copy the contents from here and paste it after your HTML code.

Step 3 :

Next up, navigate to the Database section in your console and move to the Rules tab.

 screenshot-area-2016-07-18-204133.png

For now, let us edit the rules to allow anyone to read and write to the database.

 screenshot-area-2016-07-18-204437

Almost all set up now.

Step 4 :

Modify the HTML to allow entering data by the user

This looks something like this :

Now let us setup our javascript to extract this data and store this in Firebase Database.

We are almost finished with uploading the data to the database.

Enter data inside the fields and press submit.

If everything went well, you will be able to see the newly entered data inside your database.

screenshot-area-2016-07-18-205651.png

Now on to retrieving this data on the server.

Our backend runs on a python script, so we have a library known as python-firebase which helps us easily fetch the data stored in the Firebase database.

The code for it goes like this

The data will be returned in JSON format, so you can manipulate and store it as you wish.

Well, that’s it!

You now know how to store and retrieve data to and from Firebase.
It makes the work a lot simpler as there is no Database schema or tables that need to be defined, firebase handles this on its own.

I hope that you found this tutorial helpful, and if you have any doubts regarding this feel free to comment down below, I would love to help you out.

Cheers.

Uploading json assets and icons to your app via the app generator

If you have tried out our app generator webpage, you should’ve noticed an option that allows you to upload a zip file which will contain the json for the event.

Why do we need this?

Well, this is needed because not every event organizer can maintain a server and API endpoints which contain the details for their event, so they can simply generate a json for the event by exporting it through the options provided to them on Google Spreadsheets and then they can upload them on the server, so that these files can be packaged in the android and web apps.

Implementation :

The implementation is pretty straightforward and consists of 3 parts :

  1. Making changes to the html file to allow user to upload the zip
<tr>
  <td valign="top">
    <label for="sessions">Zip containing .json files</label>
  </td>
  <td valign="top">
    <input accept=".zip" type="file" id="uploadZip" name="sessions">
  </td>
</tr>

2. Retrieve this file in the javascript and then make an AJAX call to the server

var file_data = $('#uploadZip').prop('files')[0];
 var form_data = new FormData();                 
 form_data.append('file', file_data);
 $.ajax({
            
                  url: '/upload.php', // point to server-side PHP script
                  cache: false,
                  contentType: false,
                  processData: false,
                  data: form_data,                         
                  type: 'post',
                  success: function(php_script_response){
                    // do something
                  }
                });

So here, the form_data contains the details about the file to be uploaded.

In the AJAX call, upload.php takes reads form_data variable and then initiates the upload to the server.

3. Setup a PHP script on the server to respond to the above AJAX call

<?php
    if ( 0 < $_FILES['file']['error'] ) {
        echo 'Error: ' . $_FILES['file']['error'] . '<br>';
    }
    else {
        move_uploaded_file($_FILES['file']['tmp_name'], "/var/www/html/uploads/upload.zip"); 
    }
?>

Here in the PHP script, the file is read and uploaded to a temporary directory in the server.

We then manually copy it to a location and name of our choice.

In case there are multiple users accessing the website and uploading their assets at the same time, we need to pass a timestamp variable to the AJAX call to and later on use it while renaming the uploaded file.

This is to ensure that the file uploaded by one user is not overwritten by another user.

How do we use this data during app compilation

The uploaded zip is then uncompressed and its contents are moved to the assets folder of the android app’s directory.

zip_ref = zipfile.ZipFile(path_to_zip_file, 'r')
zip_ref.extractall(directory)
zip_ref.close()
#TODO: Change path here
for f in os.listdir(directory+ "/zip"):
	if f.endswith('.json'):
		copyfile(f, directoy + "open-event-android/android/app/src/main/assets/"+f)
	elif f.endswith('.png'):
		copyfile(f, directory + "open-event-android/android/app/src/main/res/drawable"+f)
replace(directory+"/open-event-android/android/app/src/main/res/values/strings.xml", 'mipmap/ic_launcher', 'drawable/' + f)

Here replace is a function that searches in the source file for the phrase supplied as it’s argument and changes it with the new phrase.

Now when the app is compiled and ran on a user’s device, it will first search for a json file in the assets directory and if it exists, use that for fetching the data instead of making a network call. For this I have used Gson to first parse the offline files otherwise retrofit makes request to the api and fetches the data from there.

But if there is no json in the assets folder, a normal network call using retrofit will be made and the data will be fetched from the API defined by the user.

How to parse json assets with gson

So most of us have json assets in our app which we parse on runtime to get the data and use it accordingly but what I have seen is that most of the people create a JSONObject or JSONArray after reading the json into an inputstream but then handling it becomes difficult since we have to manually extract every entity in each array which makes it bound to a lot of errors. A better approach to using it is making use of gson : an open source library by Google to serialise and deserialise Java object to (and from) Json. It’s pretty easy to use and makes the development process easy. For those of you not still convinced on using gson, I’d like to demonstrate the code we had to write to without using gson and the one using gson as well.

So to start with lets see the json file we’ll be using. It’s the events.json file from the open event project.

{
  "events": [
    {
      "color": "#fdfdfd",
      "email": "[email protected]",
      "end_time": "2015-07-14T00:00:00",
      "id": 4,
      "latitude": 37.783839,
      "location_name": "Moscone centre",
      "logo": "http://mysecureshell.readthedocs.org/en/latest/_images/logo_redhat.png",
      "longitude": -122.400546,
      "name": "FOSSASIA",
      "slogan": "Fossasia",
      "start_time": "2015-05-28T13:00:00",
      "url": "www.google.com"
    }
  ]
}

As you can see it has an object that has an array of event objects. So what we’ll first do is that we’ll get the whole json as a string by openeing an inputstream and then directing it to a buffer. Then we convert the buffer array to a string object.

String json = null;
try {
    InputStream inputStream = getAssets().open("events.json");
    int size = inputStream.available();
    byte[] buffer = new byte[size];
    inputStream.read(buffer);
    inputStream.close();
    json = new String(buffer, "UTF-8");

} catch (IOException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}

Now we have the json as a string which we can now parse it using a combination of JSONObject and JSONArray. First we’ll access data in the outer json object i.e. “events”. That’ll be done by

JSONObject jsonObject = new JSONObject(json);
JSONArray events = jsonObject.getJSONArray("events");

Now that we have the array, we can traverse it to get the objects inside events array

for (int j=0; j < events.length(); j++){
    JSONObject cit = events.getJSONObject(j);
    String color = jsonObject.getString("color");
    String email = jsonObject.getString("email"); 
    String endTime = jsonObject.getString("end_time");
    String id = jsonObject.getString("id");
    String latitude = jsonObject.getString("latitude");
    String locationName = jsonObject.getString("location_name");
    String logo = jsonObject.getString("logo");
    String longitude = jsonObject.getString("longitude");
    String name = jsonObject.getString("name");
    String slogan = jsonObject.getString("slogan");
    String startTime = jsonObject.getString("start_time");
    String url = jsonObject.getString("url");
}

This is how we go about it. Now for the exiting part.

We already have an Event data class which has the constructor, getters and setters etc.

public class Event {

    int id;

    String name;

    String email;

    String color;

    String logo;

    @SerializedName("start_time")
    String start;

    @SerializedName("end_time")
    String end;

    float latitude;

    float longitude;

    @SerializedName("location_name")
    String locationName;

    String url;

    String slogan;

    public Event(int id, String name, String email, String color, String logo, String start,
                 String end, float latitude, float longitude, String locationName, String url, String slogan) {
        this.id = id;
        this.name = name;
        this.email = email;
        this.color = color;
        this.logo = logo;
        this.start = start;
        this.end = end;
        this.latitude = latitude;
        this.longitude = longitude;
        this.locationName = locationName;
        this.url = url;
        this.slogan = slogan;
    }

    public String getEmail() {
        return email;
    }

    public void setEmail(String email) {
        this.email = email;
    }

    public String getColor() {
        return color;
    }

    public void setColor(String color) {
        this.color = color;
    }

    public String getUrl() {
        return url;
    }

    public void setUrl(String url) {
        this.url = url;
    }

    public String getSlogan() {
        return slogan;
    }

    public void setSlogan(String slogan) {
        this.slogan = slogan;
    }

    public int getId() {

        return id;

    }

    public void setId(int id) {
        this.id = id;
    }

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    public void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public String getLogo() {
        return logo;
    }

    public void setLogo(String logo) {
        this.logo = logo;
    }

    public String getStart() {
        return start;
    }

    public void setStart(String start) {
        this.start = start;
    }

    public String getEnd() {
        return end;
    }

    public void setEnd(String end) {
        this.end = end;
    }

    public float getLatitude() {
        return latitude;
    }

    public void setLatitude(float latitude) {
        this.latitude = latitude;
    }

    public float getLongitude() {
        return longitude;
    }

    public void setLongitude(float longitude) {
        this.longitude = longitude;
    }

    public String getLocationName() {
        return locationName;
    }

    public void setLocationName(String locationName) {
        this.locationName = locationName;
    }

}

Now here we name the parameters to the same as that in the json we have or we can just add @SerializedName(entity_name). Then we go to the code for actually retrieving the data from the json file using this data class. How we can do that is by first making a class that’ll get the array of events for us.

public class EventResponseList {
    @SerializedName("events")
    public List<Event> event;
}

Now all we do is

EventResponseList eventResponseList = gson.fromJson(json, EventResponseList.class);

We have a list of events that were in the json array.

Voila! That’s it. It’s so easy to get a list of all the events from the JSONArray and since the library is available for gradle, it’s even better. You can just add

compile 'com.google.code.gson:gson:2.7'

to your build.gradle dependencies and you’re good to go. Cheers!

Push your apk to your GitHub repository from Travis

In this post I’ll guide you on how to directly upload the compiled .apk from travis to your GitHub repository.

Why do we need this?

Well, assume that you need to provide an app to your testers after each commit on the repository, so instead of manually copying and emailing them the app, we can setup travis to upload the file to our repository where the testers can fetch it from.

So, lets get to it!

Step 1 :

Link Travis to your GitHub Account.

Open up https://travis-ci.org.

Click on the green button in the top right corner that says “Sign in with GitHub”

screenshot-area-2016-07-15-205733.png<

Step 2 :

Add your existing repository to Travis

Click the “+” button next to your Travis Dashboard located on the left.

screenshot-area-2016-07-15-210630.png<

Choose the project that you want to setup Travis from the next page

screenshot-area-2016-07-15-210916.png
Toggle the switch for the project that you want to integrate

Click the cog here and add an Environment Variable named GITHUB_API_KEY.
Proceed by adding your Personal Authentication Token there.
Read up here on how to get the Token.

 screenshot-area-2016-07-15-213931.png<

Great, we are pretty much done here.

Let us move to the project repository that we just integrated and create a new file in the root of repository by clicking on the “Create new file” on the repo’s page.

Name it .travis.yml and add the following commands over there

language: android 
jdk:
  - oraclejdk8
android:
  components:
    - tools
    - build-tools-24.0.0
    - android-24
    - extra-android-support
    - extra-google-google_play_services
    - extra-android-m2repository
    - extra-google-m2repository
    - addon-google_apis-google-24
 before_install:
 - chmod +x gradlew
 - export JAVA8_HOME=/usr/lib/jvm/java-8-oracle
 - export JAVA_HOME=$JAVA8_HOME
 after_success:
 - chmod +x ./upload-gh-pages.sh
 - ./upload-apk.sh
 script:
 - ./gradlew build

Next, create a bash file in the root of your repository using the same method and name it upload-apk.sh

  #create a new directory that will contain out generated apk
  mkdir $HOME/buildApk/ 
  #copy generated apk from build folder to the folder just created
  cp -R app/build/outputs/apk/app-debug.apk $HOME/android/
  #go to home and setup git
  cd $HOME
  git config --global user.email "[email protected]"
  git config --global user.name "Your Name" 
  #clone the repository in the buildApk folder
  git clone --quiet --branch=master  https://user-name:[email protected]/user-name/repo-name  master > /dev/null
  #go into directory and copy data we're interested
  cd master  cp -Rf $HOME/android/* .
  #add, commit and push files
  git add -f .
  git remote rm origin
  git remote add origin https://user-name:[email protected]/user-name/repo-name.git
  git add -f .
  git commit -m "Travis build $TRAVIS_BUILD_NUMBER pushed"
  git push -fq origin master > /dev/null
  echo -e "Donen"

Once you have done this, commit and push these files, a Travis build will be initiated in few seconds.
You can see it ongoing in your Dashboard at https://travis-ci.org/.

After the build has completed, you will can see an app-debug.apk in your Repository.

IMPORTANT NOTE :

You might be wondering as to why did I write [skip ci] in the commit message.

Well the reason for that is, Travis starts a new build as soon as it detects a commit made on the master branch of your repository.

So once the apk is uploaded, that will trigger another build in Travis and hence forming an infinite loop.

We can prevent this in 2 ways :

First, simply write [skip ci] somewhere in the commit message and it will cause Travis to ignore the commit.

Or, push the apk to any other branch which is not configured for Travis build.

So well, that’s almost it.

I hope that you found this tutorial helpful, and if you have any doubts regarding this feel free to comment down below, I would love to help you out.

Cheers.

Set up Firebase to upload user files

If you’ve read my previous post on uploading files to server, you might have noticed that it was not an easy task to achieve.

There is way too much boilerplate code for uploading a single file, and it will be much more complex in case we plan to upload multiple files, which I need to do for my project.

So what’s the solution to this?

ENTER FIREBASE!

Yeah, you read it right, Firebase once again to the rescue!

I came to know that firebase allows user to store and access the files easily to the built in storage.

Enough chatter for now, lets get to code!

Step 1 :

Add your project to Firebase from the console.

newProj.PNG

Click on the Blue button

Step 2 :

Add Firebase to your webapp

Open the project, you’ve just created and click on the bright red button that says, “ Add Firebase to your web app”

addFirebase.PNGCopy the contents from here and paste it after your HTML code.

Step 3 :

Open the “Storage” tab from the navigation drawer and navigate to the rules tab over there.
We need to set up specific rules as to who all can upload and read files to the storage bucket.

storageRules.PNG
For testing purposes, I’ve allowed everyone to read and write to my storage, but that shouldn’t be the case for your production app

Step 4 :

Add code for uploading your files.

First create a document selection widget and an upload button in your website’s index.html.

<tr>
<td valign=”top”>
<label for=”icon”>Zip File</label>
</td>
<td valign=”top”>
<input accept=”.zip” type=”file” id=”uploadZip” name=”icon”>
</td>
</tr>

Next, create a button to initiate the upload

<tr>
<td colspan=”5″ style=”text-align:center”>
<button type=”submit”>Upload Zip</button>
</td>
</tr>

Next up, inside the JavaScript, add a submitlistener for the submit button and call preventDefault inside it to prevent the form from doing the default action.

var form = document.querySelector(“form”);
form.addEventListener(“submit”, function(event) {
event.preventDefault();

Next up, get a reference to the upload location from your firebase storage bucket.

var timestamp = Number(new Date());
var storageRef = firebase.storage().ref(timestamp.toString());

Next, get the upload button from its ID and add its contents to a variable named file_data.

var $ = jQuery;
var file_data = $(‘#uploadZip’).prop(‘files’)[0];

Now upload that file to firebase.

storageRef.put(file_data);

If everything went as expected, you’ll be able to see the uploaded files onto your firebase console.

 storage

So, you can really appreciate the awesomeness of Firebase by now.
It has replaced the work done by over 50+ lines of code (spread around AJAX calls, PHP Scripts and JavaScript methods) by a single method call.

I would urge you to go through the documentation for more clarity on this.
https://firebase.google.com/docs/storage/

Well, that was it for now.
Next time, I’ll tell you how to retrieve the files back from the storage and add user’s details to Firebase Database.(Yeah, no need for Tables and SQL anymore!)

Cheers. 😀